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Need help with spraying lacquer

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Forum topic by griff posted 07-05-2008 05:27 AM 3326 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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griff

1207 posts in 3903 days


07-05-2008 05:27 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Just getting started with lacquer, have sprayed a couple times before no problems until tonight. After going through the same routine, when the lacquer dries it is chalky looking. it will not wipe off like overspray does, I can put thinner on a rag and wipe it off though. What do you lacquer users think I`m doing wrong ?

-- Mike, Bruce Mississippi = Jack of many trades master of none


6 replies so far

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 4455 days


#1 posted 07-05-2008 05:52 AM

Is the being sprayed over a stain? Maybe the stain isn’t quite dry.

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griff

1207 posts in 3903 days


#2 posted 07-05-2008 06:21 AM

Dennis thanks there is no stain, finishing natural walnut.
The first couple of coats didnt do it.

-- Mike, Bruce Mississippi = Jack of many trades master of none

View BroDave's profile

BroDave

107 posts in 3955 days


#3 posted 07-05-2008 12:47 PM

Sounds like a moisture/humidity problem Mike.

-- .

View griff's profile

griff

1207 posts in 3903 days


#4 posted 07-05-2008 02:09 PM

Thanks BroDave , there was a small thunder head and shower pass over earlier. Ill try again this morning.

-- Mike, Bruce Mississippi = Jack of many trades master of none

View Quixote's profile

Quixote

206 posts in 3779 days


#5 posted 07-05-2008 02:38 PM

Griff,

You’re experiencing “lacquer Blush”, where your finish has a chalky or milky look.

This is caused by high humidity and quick drying solvent. If you’re spraying the paint, the fast drying solvents like acetone are called “carrier solvents”, because they mostly evaporate before the paint hit’s the surface. This rapid evaporation cools the paint and attracts moisture from a high humidity environment.

Your solution is to either wait for low humidity , or change your solvent to a slower drying formula.

Call your paint store and tell them you are looking for a slower drying lacquer thinner. They should have thinner available in temperature ranges such as 60 to 70, 70 to 85 and 85 and up or something similar.

If they act like you just arrived from Mars…ask them for some “lacquer retarder.” This is a concentrated slow solvent that you add to your existing fast drying solvent as a ‘cocktail solution’ to slow down the evaporation.

If the guy at your paint store thinks you’ re looking for the short bus…cal your local automotive paint supplier.

Your duPont store should have either a gallon of “3661 lacquer thinner”. or a pint of “3696 retarder”.

I’ve sprayed a couple of hundred gallons of clear lacquer on walnut custom van furniture and trim work using 3661 as my preferred solvent with excellent results.

Hope this helps, but if you need more help let me know, I’ll give you my cel phone to walk you through it.

Q

p.S. Edit.

My preferred application method for finishing is duPont automotive grade “380 s” clear mixed 1 1/2 paint to 1 part 3661 medium thinner applied through a pressure pot, or 1 to 1 using other spray equipment.

-- I don't make sawdust...I produce vast quantities of "Micro Mulch."

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griff

1207 posts in 3903 days


#6 posted 07-05-2008 03:20 PM

Quixote, Thanks, I`m gona go this morning to get some retarder, been needing to go anyway about to run out of lacqurer, havent sprayed 5 gallon yet, all this is very new to me. Thanks again.

-- Mike, Bruce Mississippi = Jack of many trades master of none

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