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Router placement question?

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Forum topic by sandhill posted 06-05-2012 11:07 PM 826 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sandhill

2122 posts in 2575 days


06-05-2012 11:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router question

Hi everyone, I was wondering if someone could answer a question? I am building a new TS & Router station
It is going between the two cabinets and I was puzzled about how far back I should put it? 10”, 14”, 16” 24”. I am thinking as far back as it can be while still being able to reach it safely.

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/


9 replies so far

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1719 days


#1 posted 06-05-2012 11:16 PM

That’s probably a good plan. Try to decide on the biggest piece you would be willing to put on the table, then locate the bit center so that that piece will lay on the table without being held.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View KnickKnack's profile

KnickKnack

982 posts in 2217 days


#2 posted 06-06-2012 10:37 AM

For what it’s worth…
I do almost all my work on my router table – I’ve just finished version 3, and the bit is 16” from the front of the table. For me, that’s an inch or two too far – I like to be quite above the piece of work as I’m routing.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

704 posts in 1152 days


#3 posted 06-06-2012 10:41 AM

I had an interesting situation today where I could not move my fence far enough away from the router bit to do the job that I wanted. So it occurs to me that the further back you put your router, the more likely you are to experience the same problem. Personally, I’d probably push my fence back as far as it goes and then put the router more or less in the centre of the distance to the front of the cabinet.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

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KnickKnack

982 posts in 2217 days


#4 posted 06-06-2012 11:19 AM

I had an interesting situation today where I could not move my fence far enough away from the router bit to do the job that I wanted.
I used to have that problem with my version 1. Version 2 had a bit more behind but still not enough.
So with my latest I have 39” behind the bit – should I need to deal with a really large board, I can always use the table “from the other side” – the joy of building your own!

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

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sandhill

2122 posts in 2575 days


#5 posted 06-06-2012 02:59 PM

Using my table from the other side is not an option for me, to the left will be my out feed table for the table saw. I see where being over the router would feel more secure but I thought you were suppose to work from the side for safety? I would think its because of it being designed as a hand held tool and your using both hands but with a table you are using your hands and fingers to move into and across the cutter it self. Anyway, I am thinking of when I may need to trim up the edge of a panel but I guess as long as 2/3 of the work is supported and you use a featherboard at the top you should be safe and get results. I think 14” I could run a 21” panel and 16” would would do a 24” panel anything more I guess I could use the router hand held. I think I like the sound of 14” Thanks guys.

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

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sandhill

2122 posts in 2575 days


#6 posted 06-06-2012 03:01 PM

Tootles What were you doing?

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

View Kelby's profile

Kelby

133 posts in 1062 days


#7 posted 06-07-2012 06:16 AM

I prefer the router to be relatively close to the front of the table, for two reasons. 1) Most work is on relatively narrow boards, and it’s convenient not to have to reach. 2) I want to have as much capacity as possible between the fence and the bit, which gives me maximum capacity for stopped dados. My router bit is probably 8-10” or so from the front edge of the table.

-- Kelby

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

704 posts in 1152 days


#8 posted 06-07-2012 12:40 PM

I had previously done a fairly large rebate across a board holding the router in my hands using a jig, but found that it was a “smidge” too shallow. Since I’d routered away the wood that I needed to support the router, I flipped the wood over and headed for the “router table” (in quotes beause it is really a loose, bench top frame and surface that is maybe 32” x 16”). The trouble was that I could not route up to either edge of the rebate without a fence to keep the cut straight, and I could not set the fence far enough away to do the job – and I’m only talking 6” on one end and 9” on the other. I ended up removing the fence and routing as close to the edge as I could judge by eye, and then cleaning the corners out by hand with a chisel.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

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sandhill

2122 posts in 2575 days


#9 posted 06-07-2012 03:24 PM

I see so it was not something you would nornaly do. I get the picture and I think I will go no more then 14”

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

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