LumberJocks

Live Edge Table Top W/Gap in Center

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Doublelive posted 06-03-2012 01:34 PM 1647 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Doublelive's profile

Doublelive

4 posts in 931 days


06-03-2012 01:34 PM

I am about to start a table. I am planning on using live edge lumber. I have found a few very nice pieces for sale locally. The issue i need help resolving is in order to get the desired width i need to marry 2 slabs together. This will leave a gap approx 1” x 16” in the center of the table. Can I fill this some how with a clear coat? The total length is 92”.I would like to keep the look of the live edge in the center if possible as it makes for a very attractive table top.


9 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6051 posts in 2176 days


#1 posted 06-03-2012 02:46 PM

I’m guessing you wouldn’t want to use a butterfly, ala Hayakawa?

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View jdmaher's profile

jdmaher

300 posts in 1327 days


#2 posted 06-03-2012 02:57 PM

Hmmm . . .

That’s an interesting idea. The gap would just be at the center of the length? Got pics?

As Jonathon said, West Systems Epoxy would do the job. My first inclination would then be to epoxy the whole top, but I think that might be too “plastic” looking (so, a BAD IDEA). Would you add any color to the epoxy (maybe go for an amber tint), or just go clear?

It might be really nice if the support were also wood worth peeking at. Will it be a trestle table?

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1479 posts in 1109 days


#3 posted 06-03-2012 03:17 PM

Why does it have to be filled? Leave it open.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View Doublelive's profile

Doublelive

4 posts in 931 days


#4 posted 06-03-2012 03:43 PM

Jim…yes the gap would only be in the center due to the slight curve to the tree, when bookmatched both pieces will be trimmed and joined together but i dont want to get too narrow and taking another 3-4 out of the width will bring me below 40”. i do like the idea of amber

View jdmaher's profile

jdmaher

300 posts in 1327 days


#5 posted 06-03-2012 04:56 PM

I’m sure there’s someone on LJ who mixes stone (et al) with woods and can offer design ideas about simulating amber with tinted epoxy. Maybe with inclusions? (A leaf of the same type of tree? Maybe a costume jewelry bee?) What is that wood?

You might want to fill in knots or streaks with dark colored epoxy, as well (if they are missing wood).

Me, I think I might take an inch or so in the middle to get a solid joint on the ends, with the void only in the middle of the length. And I think I’d round out those corners, asymetrically. The squarer side looks just okay, but the clipped corners are a bit jarring. Just enough curve to “naturalize” the edges.

Looks like you got a great project underway! I hope we’ll see pictures as you move along.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

6051 posts in 2176 days


#6 posted 06-03-2012 10:59 PM

Jim,
That was my first thought as I do a lot of turquoise and epoxy fills in naturally occurring voids. But, in this case, I still think a couple butterflies would be better looking.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1064 posts in 1034 days


#7 posted 06-03-2012 11:12 PM

puts on his rock carving hat: Soapstone grinds to a fine charcoal gray powder, but sands beautifully. I have a piece of alabaster that makes a white powder. I also have some brown soapstone but haven’t seen any since I got this piece. Serpentine would be green, usually like a dark forest green.

puts on his radio control airplane building hat: I’ve tinted epoxy using Testor’s plastic enamel. You only need a very small amount. Simulated amber would use yellow and red to achieve a slightly orange tinted yellow.

ONLY SOLVENT BASED colorings. No water based coloring (like food coloring) and you can use acetone or denatured alcohol, but never isopropyl alcohol (it contains water).

Personally, after looking at your photo, I’d not want to “busy up” that gap by doing a lot of stuff in there. The wood is the focus (again… my opinion). I’d be more apt to fill that void with black, knife grade epoxy and let the wood talk.

View higtron's profile

higtron

200 posts in 1425 days


#8 posted 06-04-2012 12:07 AM

What about an inlay make a inlay piece the shape and perhaps contrasting wood set the inlay on the top. define the the shape useing a sharp xacto knife than highlight the out lined area with a sharp pensil in the knife kerf. use a router to hog out the majority of the hole, than use a sharp chisle and clean up to the line. I think this wood look better than epoxy fill.

-- If I cut it too short I can scab a piece on, but if it's too long what do I do?

View Chik's profile

Chik

2 posts in 791 days


#9 posted 10-21-2012 02:53 AM

I just finished a similar (fir) slab and I have to go with Charlie and would recommend a simple ‘knife-grade’ black epoxy – stay away from using a clear epoxy . It somehow makes the void look like a flaw. The black epoxy does not distract from the piece. Emphasize the grain & character of the wood… I would sand VERY carefully and thoroughly – at least to 600 gr, followed by several coats of Deft Danish Oil & 2-3 coats of a good paste wax. Good Luck. Please let us see some progress pics.

-- Dan ~ Slocan Valley

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase