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Forum topic by jeff robinson posted 06-02-2012 08:48 PM 3085 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jeff robinson

99 posts in 2450 days


06-02-2012 08:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

has anyone ever used pecan for any projects? I just received about 200bf to 300bf some as wide as 20”. was wondering how hard to work

-- jeff robinson, panama city, fl


12 replies so far

View MichaelR's profile

MichaelR

42 posts in 1152 days


#1 posted 06-02-2012 09:02 PM

Easy cutting/planing/drilling/carving. Has the tendency to blotch like pine when stained. I like it for smaller projects. Cutoffs make a great burning wood for your smoker. My BIL uses it exclusively in his Big Green Egg and I’ll put his ribs and brisket up against anybody’s.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1188 posts in 1199 days


#2 posted 06-04-2012 11:29 AM

I have cut a lot of pecan. It is very hard. Rough on your saw blades and knives. Beautiful wood. I have some for sale if anyone needs some. $3.00/BF.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View Jeff in Huntersville's profile

Jeff in Huntersville

402 posts in 1918 days


#3 posted 06-04-2012 12:21 PM

I second Wood-Mizer’s opinion. It’s very hard, dense and heavy and will splinter easily if your tools aren’t sharp. But it’s beautiful when finished. It’s the same species as hickory.

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

454 posts in 1122 days


#4 posted 06-04-2012 03:24 PM

I have used pecan on several projects and can confirm the comments above. It is an open grained wood and does not take oil based stain (such as Minwax) well. Water based dyes (such as Moser) work extremely well on it and offers a lot of color variations. The projects in the photos below were done using Mosers Medium walnut water soluable dye followed by a sealer and polyurethane.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View jeff robinson's profile

jeff robinson

99 posts in 2450 days


#5 posted 06-05-2012 12:37 AM

thanks for the info

-- jeff robinson, panama city, fl

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1188 posts in 1199 days


#6 posted 06-05-2012 01:59 AM

Awesome chest!

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2241 posts in 2270 days


#7 posted 06-05-2012 02:39 AM

We build kitchens out of hickory / pecan a lot and we never stain the wood. There is too much loss in natural beauty when stain application is utilized. I have stained hickory one time and the stain actually neutralized the beauty of the wood, bringing the finished product from what would have been excellent down to what I considered average. Now we never stain hickory, if a customer is looking for a stained finish I will steer them away from hickory.

As for Hickory or Pecan, as mentioned, it is very hard. Sharp blades is recommended and when shaping with less then 5 hp you would want to consider multiple passes. Have fun wood working!

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View danr's profile

danr

151 posts in 1908 days


#8 posted 06-05-2012 02:58 AM

Hi Jeff,

Yes I have made several projects with pecan/hickory. One project was an entire wall built in consisting of shelves and a high, pool table viewing seat/bench with drawers underneath. I was fortunate enough find some really intersting grain/figure. Pecan can somtimes be a bit un-interesting in terms of grain pattern and color in my opinion.

It is not too bad to work with. Although it seemed like it may be a bit prone to splitting I can say that I did not experience that. I also did not have any issues with staining but I used a very light tone to make the grain pop a bit. I think Pecan lends itself very well to furniture styles that I would call slightly on the “rustic” side (again my opinion). Enjoy your Pecan.

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1078 days


#9 posted 06-05-2012 04:34 AM

Yes, I have used pecan, if you look in my projects, you can see a kitchen I did with pecan. It is hard and it is brittle, it’s in the hickory family, and it works very similiarly, only it’s just a little denser.
I had no problems staining it, but I use a pigment stain such as cabot over the dye stain such as minwax… Actually I’ll use the pigments over that type of dye stain any day of the week.

A good saw blade will have no difficulty with cutting the wood, but be prepared to sharpen chisels, planer blades and so on. There will be times it will be easier to plane and scrape this wood rather than sand, though I recomend you sand afterwords just the same for stain regularity.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1188 posts in 1199 days


#10 posted 06-05-2012 11:32 AM

It moves a lot, too, so make sure it is dry and and in equilibrium with the end use environment.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View kathiiford's profile

kathiiford

1 post in 905 days


#11 posted 06-05-2012 06:34 PM

Pecan is a deciduous shrub with the natural name of Carya illinoinensis. Pecan wooden is recognized as a close-grained wooden. They are a mild reddish-brown wooden with infrequent darkish lines.

-- wardrobes, http://www.funique.co.uk/bedroom-furniture/wardrobes.html

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1188 posts in 1199 days


#12 posted 06-07-2012 02:19 AM

It is not a shrub, at least not in Georgia!

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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