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Nightmare! Dry lubing my planer bed rusted it

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Forum topic by Everett1 posted 687 days ago 2203 views 1 time favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Everett1

208 posts in 1036 days


687 days ago

Hello,

So the other day, i scrubbed down the iron bed with the back of a Scotch Brite sponge, and some Denatured Alcohol. I followed it up with a spray down of PB Blaster Dry lube (got it at Home Depot):
http://www.blastergroup.com.au/dry-teflon-lube.html

Next morning, the bed was all rusty. I freaked, as it was my Grizz G0453P Planer that my wife got me for my 30th earlier this year, and I love that thing.

I used denatured alcohol on it with the same method back when I first got it, and used PB Blaster Dry Lube without this issue months ago. Now, it was humid out when I did it, but common.

Maybe it wasn’t either that caused it, but I went back and scrubbed it with Mineral Spirits and 2000 grit wet sandpaper to get rid of the rust, and used Good ol’ Johnsons paste wax this time, and it’s been fine. I really don’t want to guinnea pig my planer beds again though to see what may have caused it.

I don’t know if it was that PB Blaster product that caused it, but figured i’d throw out the word of caution.

-- Ev in Framingham, MA


25 replies so far

View CAH's profile

CAH

8 posts in 755 days


#1 posted 687 days ago

Alcohol is hygroscopic so it is possible that this pulled water into the pores of the bed. I have used Bruce paste wax for years and never had problems and you get the lubricity as well.

CAH

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11605 posts in 2190 days


#2 posted 687 days ago

Butcher’s Wax works for me for 20+ years…no rust and wood slides well : )
Part of an online article follows below .

Butcher’s Wax is a brand of paste wax, primarily carnauba wax, which, when dried, leaves a hard shiny coating of wax that is fantastic for many uses. This is an awesome product that should be in every DIY’er’s arsenal. Butcher’s Wax on your table saw table will help prevent surface rusting and it will make wood glide right over the surface. Butcher’s wax on wooden drawers works wonderfully well to keep the drawers sliding smoothly. Butcher’s Wax is nice as a protective coating over a varnished wood floor, or over a clear finished wood article that will get some handling.

You can find Butcher’s Wax in any hardware store and in many grocery stores. It would be with floor polishes and cleaners. It is so useful and a 1lb. can lasts a long, long time.

The regular Butcher’s Wax and the Bowling Alley wax by Butchers are really the same product, but the Bowling Alley wax is clear, and the regular Butcher’s Wax can add a tiny bit of amber. Other than that, the products can be used interchangeably

-- When you arrive at my front door, please knock softly but firmly. I like soft , firm, knockers : )

View BootsTripp's profile

BootsTripp

34 posts in 714 days


#3 posted 687 days ago

Just curious if the scotch brite pad was brand new, or if it was taken from the kitchen or laundry room. Reason I ask is maybe it was used with cleaning products that contained mild acid, or even vinegar might have been enough to cause a little surface rust, I don’t know. But that’s interesting and a good heads up.

-- The Dude abides

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2151 days


#4 posted 687 days ago

dry lube is a lube and not a rust protector. you use dry lube (generally speaking) in a place where you need lubrication between parts, but cannot introduce grease – like chuck jaws (I use graphite as lube… am not familiar with PB blaster product).

to protect against rust and introduce slick action for WW purposes use paste wax – cheaper, and simpler solution. I personally don’t use anything but paste wax (johnson) on any metals in the shop. I also do not use scorch brite or anything abrasive unless I’m trying to remove surface rust spots – to clean I use a NEW uncontaminated paper towel.

I live in Boston where humidity is a major issue in the summer (starting now), and have not had any major issues in the past couple of years (I do keep my machines covered when not in use to keep humidity levels around cast iron to a minimum.

hope this helps.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109369 posts in 2079 days


#5 posted 687 days ago

It’s a lot less work to use a random orbital sander on top of a medium scotch brite and automotive rubbing compound after that you use a rag under the ROS until all the rubbing compound is up and then apply some wax with a rag and Ros . Almost any wax (automotive,floor wax,etc) will work but read the label and make sure it doesn’t contain silicone.Silicome will contaminate all the wood you joint and cause fish eye in your finish. DN or lacquer thinner is good for the first cleaning of new tools to get all of the gunk off of them but not a good choice after that.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

896 posts in 857 days


#6 posted 687 days ago

sand it, then apply slip it… even easier. :P

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109369 posts in 2079 days


#7 posted 687 days ago

There’s a problem with slip it ,it has Polydimethylsiloxanes in it also know as silicone. Silicone can contaminate your whole shop an create all kinds of finishing problems

http://www.slipit.com/msds/mech_sliding_compound.pdf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polydimethylsiloxane

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11605 posts in 2190 days


#8 posted 687 days ago

Go with the wax (non- silicone variety) ...cheap , easy , effective , done : )
A one pound can with last you for years to come.
Wax on….. Wax off , Everettson : )

-- When you arrive at my front door, please knock softly but firmly. I like soft , firm, knockers : )

View Everett1's profile

Everett1

208 posts in 1036 days


#9 posted 686 days ago

Thanks guys
I’ll stick with the paste wax from. Ow on

Purplev where in Boston? I work in Dorchester and live in Framingham

-- Ev in Framingham, MA

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2151 days


#10 posted 686 days ago

I’m in Winchester these days. a tad bit north of you. not too far. how do you like Framingham?

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

387 posts in 701 days


#11 posted 686 days ago

I’ve used paraffin wax with great results.. pick it up at your local market; sold as canning wax (Gulf wax). Dissolved in mineral spirits, you can put it on as a liquid and it leaves a thin film of wax after the mineral spirits evaporates off. It’s also great for dipping small bare metal parts in. I have a masons jar of the stuff and made up a little basket out of some extra hardwire cloth.. throw the parts in the basket, give it a few dips and let dry.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11605 posts in 2190 days


#12 posted 686 days ago

Such a great little dipping basket idea !! Thank you : )

-- When you arrive at my front door, please knock softly but firmly. I like soft , firm, knockers : )

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1826 posts in 2063 days


#13 posted 686 days ago

Just received the latest issue of Fine Woodworking, where they compared various anti-rust products. One of the best was plane old WD40. Paste wax while slicking up the surface didn’t do much to protect against rust.

-- Joe

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11605 posts in 2190 days


#14 posted 686 days ago

As much as I like WD-40, I wouldn’t use it on my table saw top or planer bed or jointer tables plus the smell of it messes with my asthma , and it would contaminate your wood and collect dust and gets tacky as it dries out.

-- When you arrive at my front door, please knock softly but firmly. I like soft , firm, knockers : )

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2263 posts in 2029 days


#15 posted 686 days ago

I give another vote to Johnson’s paste wax. I live in MA and have my shop in an old barn. I wax about two times a year, unless I notice some sticking sooner; that would usually be on the planer or jointer. I have no rust problems.

Like others have mentioned, I keep my cast iron surfaces covered. I use pieces of cardboard. Before I did this, there were times when the temperature and humidity would rise quickly, and condensation would form on the iron. The cardboard keeps the warm moist air from flowing directly over the cold iron, but doesn’t trap the air in..

-- “A clear conscience is the sure sign of a bad memory.” ― Mark Twain

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