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Forum topic by scribble posted 06-01-2012 03:24 AM 2371 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scribble

113 posts in 1665 days


06-01-2012 03:24 AM

I am looking to start working with rough sawn 4/4 wood and am looking to get the most out of it. I am thinking of slicing it to make it 1/2” or just under thickness. What is the best method for doing this. The wood is mostly going to be 3-5 tall.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”


15 replies so far

View rockindavan's profile

rockindavan

299 posts in 2100 days


#1 posted 06-01-2012 03:33 AM

You could use a bandsaw, there are plenty of resawing references out there. Woodwhisperer has a good youtube video “Wish you were Veneer”. You could also use a tablesaw, but even if you flipped it end for end it would only net a 6” or so board. The most you could hope for in thickness is about 3/8 due to the milling required before resawing and after. Maybe a little more if you are lucky enough for a thicker 4/4 board that is super straight.

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scribble

113 posts in 1665 days


#2 posted 06-01-2012 04:33 AM

OK so maybe for the current project I should just straighten the boards and plane to 3/4” and use it at that thickness. The bandsaw I currently have is a small 10” craftsman bench top unit with only a 3” opening.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3112 days


#3 posted 06-01-2012 04:53 AM

you can resaw with either a bandsaw, table saw or a handsaw.

bandsaw and handsaw will yield the thicker 2 slices as the blades are thinner, but a TS can be easier and more accessible to most people – you slice half the board with the blade at full height, turn it end for end and slice it on the other side to release the 2 slices apart – make sure you use safety devices as these cuts can be a bit unsafe with the blade at full height and the pieces so narrow.

either way you will probably get less than 2×3/8” boards from a 4/4 board if you resaw it in half minus blade thickness and re-flatenning them

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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scribble

113 posts in 1665 days


#4 posted 06-01-2012 01:12 PM

Ok so when people get 4/4 wood do they usually plane down to 3/4” or just get it smooth on all sides and then make sure all pieces are the same thickness. I just don’t want to take such nice wood and make half of it sawdust.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1698 days


#5 posted 06-01-2012 02:08 PM

Assumming you have a jointer and a thickness planer. Joint your board until it is flat. Joint one edge using the flat face against the jointer fence. Then run the piece through the planer with the jointed face down. Then go to your table saw with the jointed edge against the rip fence and shave the raw edge off. You now should have an even square piece.
Do not try all of this with a long board you can end up with a thin piece if there is cupping or a hump. Cross cut the lumber into smaller over size pieces. It should also be noted that the pieces will have stress relieved after milling and should not be milled to final thickness but allowed to rest flat and should be stickered to keep them off of concrete, metal, etc.l
If you do not have machinery as noted above this can be done by hand with hand planes but that is another method you can research on the web.
If you have a router look up router sleds and the above can be achived that way.

-- Jerry

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scribble

113 posts in 1665 days


#6 posted 06-01-2012 02:14 PM

I think I am not making it clear what I am attempting to do. I am looking to get some oak from woodcraft to use for a changing pad surround. I am looking to get the most of my money on the wood and figured I don’t need to make this project very thick so I was thinking I could resew the 4/4 board to roughly 2 x 3/8-1/2 thick boards and have plenty left over for a small box down the road.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3112 days


#7 posted 06-01-2012 03:30 PM

YES – 4/4 rough boards will usually yield you 3/4” final material, but if you can get it a bit thicker- go for it. there is no need to just plane it down cause 3/4” is a known thickness. as long as you get all the boards to the same thickness – depending on the part you are making, sometimes making it as thick as possible is the way to go (table tops , or in your case a changing pad). just make sure all the boards are the same thickness.

If you want to maximize material and get the best bang for the buck, and you want to resaw a board to make 2, and you are aiming at 1/2”+ thickness, than you should go with 6/4 material which will leave you with the excess of the saw kerf, and the jointing/thicknessing waste but still get you final thickness above 1/2”

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3112 days


#8 posted 06-01-2012 03:34 PM

just to add to the above – if the wood at woodcraft is perfectly flat , than it’s possible to resaw 4/4 to 2×3/8” – theoretically, but it really sucks when you have all these plans on saving money, and you resaw the board, and it twists on you, and to reflatten it you end up with 1/4” material – than all those savings have gone out the window.

don’t ask me how I know…

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1815 days


#9 posted 06-01-2012 05:45 PM

I would say that it is unlikely that you could get 2 3/8” boards re-sawing 4/4 stock. Perhaps one 3/8” and one 1/4” is a more likely scenario because you have to take into account the saw kerf and resurfacing on 2 sides. If you want 2 3/8” boards from a single piece of stock go w/ 5/4.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 1728 days


#10 posted 06-01-2012 05:56 PM

If you can buy thicker boards, I’d say go that route. 6/4 or 8/4 boards will definitely yield what you want and you’ll have plenty left over for other projects.

Nothing is worse than saving just a little buying the theoretical minimum of materials only to find out that the minimum yielded something you can’t use… then having to go back and buy the size you should have bought in the beginning. So, essentially, you’re buying twice.

I learned those lessons long ago. Now I just buy more than I think I need and learn to accept the extra as waste or leftovers for something else.

I blame my engineering mindset for wanting to rid myself of seeming inefficiencies only to find out they were necessary to get the result I wanted.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3186 posts in 2240 days


#11 posted 06-01-2012 05:56 PM

If you have 5/4 and are real lucky, you can get a pair of 1/2” – finished one side. If you really want to go this route, slice into 1/8” veneer, you should get 3-4 pieces after planing and jointing. THe thinner the pieces, if they twist, it doen’t matter.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View scribble's profile

scribble

113 posts in 1665 days


#12 posted 06-01-2012 10:11 PM

Ok so I think I will just go with the making out of thicker wood as I am kinda of on a time crunch and don’t have allot of time to be trying out new ideas.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2633 posts in 2573 days


#13 posted 06-02-2012 01:56 AM

Another option is to just use the 1/2” wood that Rockler and maybe Woodcraft carry, already cut to the thickness you want. Pricey, maybe so, but it’s already the thickness you want. Consider the time (and fingers) you save by buying already resawn and sanded to thickness.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2549 days


#14 posted 06-02-2012 05:21 PM

One way to get a smaller saw kerf and have more wood left is to put a good thin kerf skill saw blade in your
table saw. They both have a 5/8” arbor, and with a zero clearance plate the skill saw blade works great. I
just finished doing this with some ziricote 8/4 wood that I had not found a use for, but it will work great for
projects as 3/4”. Just cut as deep as you can on one side and flip it over and putting the same side against
the fence cut the other side. This method will work good since the wood you mentioned is 3” to 5” tall.
With a good sharp blade, the planing will be minimal.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 1728 days


#15 posted 06-03-2012 07:06 PM

With a good sharp blade, the planing will be minimal

Add in “with one square face and something square to hold that to” and I’ll agree with you.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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