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Forum topic by balidoug posted 05-25-2012 03:39 AM 1420 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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balidoug

363 posts in 1132 days


05-25-2012 03:39 AM

I’m looking for a particular piece of hardware, preferably brass. The search is made difficult because I have no idea what it’s called. Its purpose is to attach/screw the legs of a table or cabinet to the table or cabinet in such a way that they can be removed and stored/transported when desired. I’ve spent days clicking through pages of brass fixtures, fittings, and other hardware, but the closest I’ve found is a means of attaching two halves of a cane (from Rockwell). The photo below, from Elegance Under Canvass by Nicholas Brawer is a fair demonstration of what I’m looking for.

Any idea what it’s called?

This brings to mind something else I need. A woodworking reverse-dictionary. I often find myself knowing what I want, but not knowing what to call it. I mean, really, who the heck uses the word “Escutcheon”? I don’t even know how to pronounce it.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant


29 replies so far

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1704 days


#1 posted 05-25-2012 03:45 AM

Try this. http://www.leevalley.com/US/hardware/page.aspx?p=40988&cat=3,43576,61994,40988

Steve

PS “eskooshun” Lee Valley has them too.

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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balidoug

363 posts in 1132 days


#2 posted 05-25-2012 03:50 AM

Steve, thanks. But it looks like a fairly permanent attachment. What I hope to find will have a female with a flange to attach to one part, and a matching flanged male. The idea is to be able to easily pop off the legs when you want to, and just as easily screw them back on.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

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balidoug

363 posts in 1132 days


#3 posted 05-25-2012 03:53 AM

BTW, thanks for the pronunciation guide. I kept coming out with “eski – mo – tion” which is either an Inuit mobile home or a bad disco tune.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

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a1Jim

112087 posts in 2231 days


#4 posted 05-25-2012 04:08 AM

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mmh

3421 posts in 2376 days


#5 posted 05-25-2012 04:14 AM

This may be what you’re looking for: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=1677&site=ROCKLER. The male & female parts can be glued into the wood and then screwed into each other for a secure and tight fit and then unscrewed to disassemble. Unfortunately you have to purchase the third piece (metal ferrel) but maybe you can use it for another project or even as a tip for the legs if the diameter of the leg is small enough.

Another option is a set of “cane couplers” http://www.amazon.com/Cane-Couplers/dp/B000GG5JVI/ref=pd_cp_hi_1 sold in a set and each are a different diameter, presuming you need one for the bottom and top of a cane to disassemble, so if you need 4 couplers of the same diameter, you’ll need to purchase 4 “sets” (8 pairs).

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

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balidoug

363 posts in 1132 days


#6 posted 05-25-2012 04:25 AM

Jim, Closer. I looked at these (that’s how i stumbled on the cane attachment), but was hoping for a more “elegant” solution. Does this sketch help or just cloud the issue?

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

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balidoug

363 posts in 1132 days


#7 posted 05-25-2012 04:27 AM

MMH, that’s what I found, and ordered 4. They will serve for the immediate project (I hope) But do not appear to be robust enough for a larger piece. Maybe I have to write to Londonderry brasses.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

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Chrrriiis

22 posts in 847 days


#8 posted 05-25-2012 04:49 AM

Worm bolt/nut? I like tee nuts for this type of thing, cheap and as strong as what is between them and the bolt.

-- Hear today, gone tomorrow

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Sylvain

553 posts in 1153 days


#9 posted 05-25-2012 02:17 PM

If you don’t stick with the brass idea …
Another option is turning a wooden screw at the top of the leg and tap the bottom of the chest.

The problem with the hanger bolt
(http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=373&rrt=1 ) is that screwing in end grain is not very good; a ferule would be recommended.

Another problem is that when you unscew it you are never sure which end of the bolt will unscrew and that is a major annoyance if it is meant to be done frequently. (and if you don’t have a plier at hand)

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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balidoug

363 posts in 1132 days


#10 posted 05-25-2012 02:25 PM

ferule – definition of ferule by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus …
www.thefreedictionary.com/ferulefer·ule (f r l). n. An instrument, such as a cane, stick, or flat piece of wood, used in punishing children. tr.v. fer·uled, fer·ul·ing, fer·ules. To punish with a ferule.

I do have two children, but I find that duct tape works fine. What exactly do you mean by “ferule”?

I think you may be on to something, and a quick look at some hardware sites suggests that ferule may be the word I was looking for (in spite of the above – real! – definition). Thanks! But still open to other eyedeas LJs.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

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balidoug

363 posts in 1132 days


#11 posted 05-25-2012 02:28 PM

Looking around, I’m not there yet. But getting closer. Thanks everybody.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

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David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1652 days


#12 posted 05-25-2012 04:59 PM

The threaded inserts are the part that go in the body and wider, they are nut plates They can usually be found with deck hardware (dunno why) and with the screw on pre-made leg spindles.

That said…

Once you get to table length legs, you have a lot of leverage against stuff. They tend to be pretty wimpy. I would personally get some threaded rod of larger diameter and some rod coupling nuts and set them in epoxy and pin them in.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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Dusty56

11659 posts in 2342 days


#13 posted 05-25-2012 05:23 PM

First thing is spelling..Ferrule :fer·rule (frl)
n.
1. A metal ring or cap placed around a pole or shaft for reinforcement or to prevent splitting.
2. A bushing used to secure a pipe joint.
[Alteration (influenced by Latin ferrum, iron) of Middle English verrele, from Old French virole, from Latin viriola, little bracelet, diminutive of viriae, bracelets; see wei- in Indo-European roots.]
ferrule v.

click for a larger image
ferrule
top: household paintbrush
center: round paintbrush
bottom: cosmetic brush
Could you possibly be looking for threaded inserts ?
http://www.globalindustrial.com/c/fasteners/Threaded-Inserts/thread-inserts-for-wood

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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balidoug

363 posts in 1132 days


#14 posted 05-25-2012 05:30 PM

Dusty, your spelling is more helpful. Mine was more fun.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1074 days


#15 posted 05-25-2012 05:34 PM

I use something called a hanger bolt to attach metal standoffs and such to woodwork. It seems these would be suited for your purpose as well.

A hanger bolt has lag-bolt threads on one end and machine threads on the other end.
The lag end would thread into your leg and the machine end would be the removeable side with a threaded insert into your casework. When you want to remove the leg, the machine thread will let loose before the lag threads and be the removeable portion.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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