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Lead paint, anyone use it?

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Forum topic by Chrrriiis posted 790 days ago 1462 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chrrriiis

22 posts in 790 days


790 days ago

It’s a bit of a silly question but, a lot of info that i use for cooking up finishes is old info and i often find ingredients refrrenced that are a bit tricky, such as lead paint. I just like the sound of lead paint, rock n roll. Does anyone actually still use it and or know of any aestetic dfferences with it compared to safe paint?

-- Hear today, gone tomorrow


15 replies so far

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fussy

980 posts in 1647 days


#1 posted 790 days ago

It’s been ILLEGAL in the US since 1977 or so.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1665 days


#2 posted 790 days ago

Nobody is using it unless they have had some around since the late 70’s – and they’re dumber than a sack full of doorknobs.

These days, having lead paint means some expensive demo work.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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Chrrriiis

22 posts in 790 days


#3 posted 790 days ago

Yeah i figured as much. Heavy stuff.

-- Hear today, gone tomorrow

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rockindavan

283 posts in 1233 days


#4 posted 789 days ago

I know a guy who knows a guy who has a hookup, but its going to cost you..jk They always make the good stuff illegal. In 10 years you probably won’t be able to buy lacquer.

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hObOmOnk

1380 posts in 2724 days


#5 posted 789 days ago

Lead containing paints are still legally available through art supplies outlets.
It is also available for historic restoration purposes.

Best wishes.
Bro. Tenzin

-- 温故知新

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Charlie

1001 posts in 883 days


#6 posted 789 days ago

Lead in paint came from the Dutch. Actually…. the hide tanners. White lead was a by-product of the tanning operation and they needed to get rid of it somehow. Turns out it made a great vehicle for paint when mixed with oil and pigment. It also made paint more durable. A lot of paints were casein paint (think Milk Paint) until lead-based paint became popular and readily available. It lasted much longer than casein paints.

Knowing what we know now about the health hazards of lead, I don’t think this is worth pursuing (if you were even going in that direction). I was trained in lead paint testing and abatement. I was certified to run an x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Once lead is introduced into the environment, it’s hard to get rid of because it doesn’t break down. It’s always lead.

At least, that is, until I finally perfect the method for turning it into GOLD…. MUAHAHahahahahahah

And interestingly… the highest lead concentration I ever found while testing, was in cheap plastic window blinds from China. And even though it was in plastic, the lead still sloughed.

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lunn

206 posts in 905 days


#7 posted 789 days ago

I just refinished/restored an old hoosier cabinet. It had been painted several times. The top coats came off eazy. Orignal coats was like i was using water. The stripper whould just sit there. I found out it was linseed oil and lead with pigment. It just isn’t worth it !!! (Note to self if it’s old and painted check for lead paint)

-- What started as a hobbie is now a full time JOB!

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lunn

206 posts in 905 days


#8 posted 789 days ago

I just refinished/restored an old hoosier cabinet. It had been painted several times. The top coats came off eazy. Orignal coats was like i was using water. The stripper whould just sit there. I found out it was linseed oil and lead with pigment. It just isn’t worth it !!! (Note to self if it’s old and painted check for lead paint)

-- What started as a hobbie is now a full time JOB!

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1595 days


#9 posted 789 days ago

The lead oxide is mainly used because it is such a durable opaque white. As to incorporating it into a finish, why bother? It is just a chalky white. If you want to get into the dangerous pigments, the other banned ones are much prettier. Uranium is a wonderful yellow and cobalt blue is fantastic. Plus they make such a pretty noise on the Geiger counter sitting on the table next to them. Some of the old green pigments were incredibly toxic as well. What s the goal? Make finishes that also double as pest control? Sneak in some gifts to expedite an inheritance? Do we get a cut?

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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NathanAllen

376 posts in 1741 days


#10 posted 789 days ago

Maybe stick with Amonia Fuming and Milk Paint. Neither leave a toxic residual timebomb and both are historically significant.

With the safety hazard posed by Lead to Children, Pets and Adults I can’t think of much advantage. Yes the colors are vibrant and the paint lasts longer than current oil based paints, but the risk is high.

If you want to go to some of the more classic Mordants, Dyes and coloring agents you should be able to order them up from Wood Finishing Enterprises. They also have standardized (read; safer) recipes for classic finishes.

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BlauSchuh

15 posts in 803 days


#11 posted 789 days ago

I (my dad actually) has a few gallons of it sitting at his service station. They used to use it for painting the curbs along the road. It’s probably hard as a rock at this point.

When I was younger (well after the outlaw date :) ) I would use it to touch up the curbs every once in a while, stuff seemed to look good forever… or at least until someone ran their car into the curb.

View adaughhetee's profile

adaughhetee

100 posts in 1280 days


#12 posted 789 days ago

I worked at a rail car factory and for certain hopper cars we used a primer with a powder mixed in it. It was only after 2 weeks mixing it without a respirator I realized the can said lead powder in one corner of the label. This was about 5 or 6 years ago so lead paint is still in use for certain applications.

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tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1583 days


#13 posted 789 days ago

It is the preferred material for watercolour painting because of the thick, opaque white. you can’t get it with anything else.

not sure why you’d want to use it for anything that wouldn’t be strictly under glass, though.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

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Chrrriiis

22 posts in 790 days


#14 posted 788 days ago

No i don’t think it’s something i’d want to use, i prefer non lethal weapons at work, it’s just interesting to learn about it. As it’s often mentioned in some of the books i have (i thiink he last time i saw it was for two tone finishing), it’s good to try and work out why, but i think a touch of modern literature can’t hurt. Thanks for the insight

charlie – what an idea for filtering light, block it with lead…

Lunn – how did you manage to discover the ingredients of the finish?

Thanks for the name Nathan, I’ll check them oit

David – uranium hmm, im sure it would make the customer tingle with excitement :)

-- Hear today, gone tomorrow

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Chrrriiis

22 posts in 790 days


#15 posted 788 days ago

It’s a shame hat wood finishing enterprises dont accept paypal on foreign orders, but still its a great source of current info

-- Hear today, gone tomorrow

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