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Jointer technique - looking for pointers

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Forum topic by sotan posted 05-18-2012 09:06 PM 1615 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sotan

7 posts in 1672 days


05-18-2012 09:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer technique question

This is my first post in here. Sorry if it is in the wrong category. None of the categories seemed like a perfect match.
Anyway – here goes:

I got a screaming deal on a Delta floor model jointer but something is wrong with my technique. Without fail, the cutterhead stops engaging the workpiece about 3-6” from the end of the workpiece (This is when I am jointing sidegrain to create a reference edge.)
This problem cannot be releated to the workpiece being warped, etc as it happens on every workpiece.
My technique, as best as I can describe it – is to keep good pressure against the infeed fence and the table. Then, when I switch to the outfeed side, I try to ‘pull’ the workpiece over the cutterhead and always keep about even pressure on the fence and the outfeed table.

Any thoughts or tips for correcting this behavior. I use the jointer less and less because of it.

FWIW – I have investigated the machine too – the outfeed table is perfectly in line with the top of the cutterhead. I don’t think it’s an issue of the machine needing adjustment – but I could be wrong there too.

-- Doug - St Paul, MN


17 replies so far

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sotan

7 posts in 1672 days


#1 posted 05-18-2012 09:08 PM

I found about a million other posts of this same question. I cant figure out how to delete it or I would. DOnt waste your time replying I have what I need. Thanks

-- Doug - St Paul, MN

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cabmaker

1507 posts in 2274 days


#2 posted 05-18-2012 10:03 PM

Doug, it s hard to tell what might be going on from here. When you say your cutterhead is lined with yur outfeed, do you mean the knives ? Could also be operator (thats you). But dont be alarmed. A jointer requires a little use to get the feel of it. Im a little confused when you say you pull the material once it has passed the cutter, can you elaborate a bit. JB

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#3 posted 05-18-2012 10:04 PM

I suck at jointing with power. I need to find those threads that fixed your problem.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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sotan

7 posts in 1672 days


#4 posted 05-18-2012 10:47 PM

Cabmaker –
Thanks for weighing in. I’ll explain a little better:

I don’t think my problem is in the machine. The knives are factory set and while that doesn’t always mean they are correct, I have tested them and they are co-planer(?) w the outfeed table at the apex. I think my problem is technique. I was told that a great technique is to use a kind of pulling motion on the outfeed side to “pull” the workpiece over the cutterhead – as opposed to pushing it from behind. (This is on an edge-jointing pass on sidegrain).
Weird thing is, when I first got into WW, I took some classes from George Vondriska. I did not have this problem on his 8” Powermatic – but I do have it on my 6” Delta. I know the ultimate answer is that I need to spend more time experimenting to perfect my technique, but sometimes someone can point out exactly where you’re going wrong.

BERTHA – I didn’t say I solved my issue, only that I found a lot of material that might explain it! ;)
Anyway – here is what I was referring to: http://www.newwoodworker.com/basic/index.html
Just do a search on this site for “jointer technique” and you’ll find a lot of guys who have similar issues w this machine.

Guys – I really appreciate you and anyone else who takes the time to respond to my posts. I am excited about joining this community. Thanks very much – and I wish you all safe, fun and successful woodworking.

Doug

-- Doug - St Paul, MN

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cabmaker

1507 posts in 2274 days


#5 posted 05-19-2012 01:34 AM

Doug, sounds like your gonna get it worked out. Assuming all is right with your settings, etc. that pretty much leaves technique. It may be that your changing soemething up going from push to pull, that is if your changing body positions abruptly. BTW Im sort of a push through guy. Transfering my left hand after the knife then my right hand soon after. Keep us posted and welcome to the club !

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Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#6 posted 05-19-2012 02:24 AM

Get yourself a 78” level and use it to assess your
board problems and jointing approach.

Such a level is vital to stock preparation in my opinion.

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Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#7 posted 05-19-2012 02:35 AM

You said the out feed table is coplanar with the cutting edge of the blade at the apex of it’s path…. Check!

But, you did not say weather or not the out feed and in feed tables are parallel…. This also is crucial….and harder to verify. You really need a precision ground straight edge that is in the neighborhood of 36” long to accurately check this.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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sotan

7 posts in 1672 days


#8 posted 05-19-2012 04:53 AM

ssnvet – I dont follow. The infeed table gets adjusted down to the depth of cut you select – so it wouldnt ever be parrallel to outfeed table – unless I am not understanding you correctly (probably the case)

Thx
Doug

-- Doug - St Paul, MN

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Tomj

204 posts in 1847 days


#9 posted 05-19-2012 08:13 AM

I think ssnvet means if the infeed and outfeed tables are in the same plane “coplaner”. Good luck.

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Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#10 posted 05-19-2012 10:34 AM

ssnvet, I fear that this is my problem but I’m uncertain how to correct it. There’s no slop in the mechanism that I can see but I don’t have a reliable straight edge long enough to check. I bought my PM used, so there’s no telling whether someone dropped him on a wing.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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sotan

7 posts in 1672 days


#11 posted 05-19-2012 01:15 PM

Ok i got you now. My little brain takes a while sometimes, but i see what you mean. Ill double check the tables today. Thanks guys.

-- Doug - St Paul, MN

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Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#12 posted 05-19-2012 10:33 PM

The plane of the in feed table needs to be parallel to the plane of the out feed table (parallel planes are not coplanar). If the gibs on the tables are not adjusted properly, or if the tables were not properly ground at the factory it will typically leave you with a little snipe at either the lead or trailing edge of the stock.

Sometimes guys loosen up the gibs on the indeed table (since this is the one that gets moved all the time) so they can move the table with less effort. But if the jibs are too loose, the in feed table can “droop” and go out of parallel.

The way you check this, is place a precision ground straight edge on the out feed table, over hanging the the full length of the in feed table. Then slowly raise up the in feed table and see where it makes contact with the straight edge. Ideally, you will make contact all across the length of the table at the same time…. If so, th tables are now coplanar…. and the in feed table is being maintained parallel to the out feed table as it rides on it’s ways.

If, when raising the in feed table, one end of the in feed table touches the straight edge first, you can use feeler gauges to determine how much out of parallel you are. You can attempt to correct any error by cleaning up the ways and then tightening up gib on the in feed table…. and if this doesn’t do the trick, you can attempt to shim the ways to raise up the drooping end…. but this is can be a difficult and iffy procedure to pull off.

Here’s The type of straight edge you need….. http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=50074&cat=1,240,45313

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#13 posted 05-19-2012 10:39 PM

Parallel planes (like parallel lines) never intersect….

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Milo

869 posts in 2784 days


#14 posted 05-21-2012 01:24 AM

huh… I set my in feed table ever so slightly LOWER than the out feed. I found the real trick to jointing is
1) Constant pressure throughout the process (I HIGHLY recommend using handled push blocks whenever possible), and 2) don’t try and joint something that is too big. Find an alternative method.

I hope that helps.

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

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Mainiac Matt

5994 posts in 1793 days


#15 posted 05-21-2012 01:37 PM

  • I set my in feed table ever so slightly LOWER than the out feed.*

that’s exactly what you want to do when operating the machine…. the distance between the plane of the outfeed table and the plane of the infeed table will be your depth of cut…. and if the two planes are parallel…. you should get good results.

the procedure I described is for checking the parallelism of the two tables, by raising up the outfeed table to the same plane as the infeed tables and checking with a precision ground straght edge…

Charles Neil does a much better job of discussing the topic here

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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