LumberJocks

Wood ID

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by PaulfromVictor posted 798 days ago 953 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View PaulfromVictor's profile

PaulfromVictor

220 posts in 1942 days


798 days ago

Hello All.

I just came accross the opportunity to buy some barn beams. I took a piece of one home to clean up a bit, and hopefully i.d. the wood. I am thinking this might be douglas fir, but wanted to get your opinions. It came from a barn in upstate NY that was built in 1904.

Thanks.
Paul


14 replies so far

View PaulfromVictor's profile

PaulfromVictor

220 posts in 1942 days


#1 posted 798 days ago

View PaulfromVictor's profile

PaulfromVictor

220 posts in 1942 days


#2 posted 798 days ago

View Scsmith42's profile

Scsmith42

125 posts in 1274 days


#3 posted 798 days ago

It looks like doug fir to me too, but I’m not familiar with the other local woods in upstate NY.

-- Scott, North Carolina, www.quartersawnoak.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2174 days


#4 posted 798 days ago

I agree doug fir.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1017 days


#5 posted 798 days ago

If it looks like a duck (fir), walks like duck (fir) and quacks like duck (fir)... then…
it’s a duck (fir)!

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1066 posts in 1073 days


#6 posted 798 days ago

It does look like doug fir. I know that a lot of hemlock was also used in that area for barns. It would not surprise me if it was eastern hemlock. Old growth hemlock can be fine grained like that. The way to tell is to look at the end grain. Douglas fir has resin canals, but hemlock does not. Resin canals are scattered in the latewood as distinctly larger pores. Hemlock does not have these obviously bigger scattered pores. You might have to use a magnifying glass or a 10X hand lens, and you will have to take a razor blade or sharp knife to make a clean slice on the end grain.

This PDF file shows what resin canals look like.

http://www.faculty.sfasu.edu/mcbroommatth/Lectures/Wood_Science/Lab_2_Resin_Canal_Species.PDF

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View Redcloud's profile

Redcloud

32 posts in 935 days


#7 posted 798 days ago

It appears, to me, to be Douglas Fir.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1447 days


#8 posted 798 days ago

I agree the grain pattern looks dougish, but the color to me is western red cedar. The sample here at Hobbit House is the color, but wider grain.

Doug fir is significantly heavier than western red cedar. I wish I could be more scientific than that.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Edziu's profile

Edziu

150 posts in 1648 days


#9 posted 798 days ago

I live in upstate new york, and I’ve done a little work with reclaimed wood, and the wood you have pictured is most likely Hemlock.

View PaulfromVictor's profile

PaulfromVictor

220 posts in 1942 days


#10 posted 797 days ago

Thank you all for your input.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1066 posts in 1073 days


#11 posted 797 days ago

Check for resin canals!! Western red cedar does not have them, either.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1447 days


#12 posted 797 days ago

Wow! This has been a cool discussion. It is wonderful to have such learning available. Thanks to all.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View superstretch's profile

superstretch

1482 posts in 1290 days


#13 posted 792 days ago

I have a good amount of this stuff too. Hemlock is definitely abundant in the area. You could always stop by pittsford lumber and they can tell you what it is. I have a good mix of doug fir, old growth white pine, and old growth spruce that I’ve salvaged from a couple of my barns/outbuildings.

http://lumberjocks.com/superstretch/blog/25981

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

688 posts in 1555 days


#14 posted 792 days ago

Hemlock

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase