LumberJocks

Plane blade sharpening.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Jigs & Fixtures forum

Forum topic by RussellAP posted 05-13-2012 10:07 PM 2356 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


05-13-2012 10:07 PM

I really need to invest in a blade sharpening machine. I’d like to keep it under $100 if possible.

I’ve been getting by with some simple and unorthodox methods.

I have a walnut block cut to a 25 degree angle with the blade attached firmly.

It sits on my belt sander tied off with a string to keep it in place.

I have another walnut block on top of that to give it some weight, then another to give it more weight and stability.

Then it’s off to the ts for some hand honing.

This blade is off a Craftsman No 4. The blade was in seriously bad shape. It was not just dull, it was flat on the end with checks like someone used it to cut bricks or something.
It’s still got a few checks but some honing on 60 grit should get them out.

My belt sander has 120 grit on it, and I think 220 would be a better choice but I havent been able to find any at HF.

Like I said, unorthodox but it works.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


16 replies so far

View ShipWreck's profile

ShipWreck

557 posts in 3215 days


#1 posted 05-13-2012 10:23 PM

Ilove your creative thinking Russell. LOL…..... hell yeah!

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#2 posted 05-13-2012 10:27 PM

It is a pain in the butt though. I’d rather have a machine that sharpens and squares the blade. It beats standing there sanding. I can go do something else for 15 – 20 minutes while it hones the blade.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6472 posts in 2061 days


#3 posted 05-13-2012 10:33 PM

You may look into the worksharps. Plus one of those inexpensive honing guides may come in useful.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#4 posted 05-13-2012 10:35 PM

Where do you get those shane?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6472 posts in 2061 days


#5 posted 05-13-2012 11:09 PM

They are widely available, they have a 2000 and a 3000. The 3000 has more bells and whistles. Stumpy nubs has some good info and a video on them. Woodcraft, rockler, amazom among others should carry them. they are almost monkey proof, which is good for me.

View doyoulikegumwood's profile

doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 3455 days


#6 posted 05-13-2012 11:13 PM

I have a work sharp 3000 best money they ever pried out off my stingy fists

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#7 posted 05-13-2012 11:20 PM

Doyoulikegumwood- How about the 2000?

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

17962 posts in 2030 days


#8 posted 05-13-2012 11:48 PM

I just use a cheap grinder from Home depot with a good Norton aluminum oxide wheel to get it close. That would get you just over the $100 mark.

If you look through Bandits stuff, he uses a eclipse type jig on a belt sander. I can’t think of a reason why it wouldn’t work but have never tried it myself. Since you already have the belt sander your cost would be under $20, and you’d have the eclipse jig to use elsewhere.

Someday I will buy something better, but I think I like the tormek style better than the worksharp. Tormek’s are expensive, but there are cheaper knock offs for less.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2136 posts in 2572 days


#9 posted 05-14-2012 12:05 AM

Russel, the 2000 has only one angle, a strict 25 degrees. The 3000 allows you to adjust multiple angles. The biggest downfall of either WS is the lack of width for planer blades. The 3000 has a table extension (that you purchase separately) that is used to work on wide plane blades on top that uses a guide. Stumpy has created a rather ingenious worksharp station for his 3000, seen on this youtube video.

I personally like the 3000 but use it for chisels, lathe chisels, as well as plane blades. I always struggled with sharpening and it saved me a great deal of pain. Neither one will let you walk away and come back to a sharp blade, but I never regretted purchasing my WS 3000.

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View ShipWreck's profile

ShipWreck

557 posts in 3215 days


#10 posted 05-14-2012 12:09 AM

Russ, The worksharp 3000 is a awsome tool, and the Veritas MK II honing guide is pretty cool all by itself. But….learning to sharpen by hand will liberate you from any machines and guides. If you do go with a method other than freehand, I would recommend the Worksharp 3000. The MK II Veritas can be a pain at times because no matter how careful you are registering the tool the the guide, it is always off a tiny bit and you end up refacing the prior grit that you just finished. I started out with the MK II and ended up giving it to the wife for her planes.

My next step in sharpening will be a 8” grinder for shaping the blade, and either Water/Akansas stones for honing. I might keep some 220 grit paper on granite block for semi rough sharpening. Sharpening is one area of this hobby that you can cut corners on costs. Feeding money to sharpening machines and guides just doesnt make sense to me.

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2136 posts in 2572 days


#11 posted 05-14-2012 12:21 AM

Russel, following up on ShipWreck’s recommendation, here is a video by Paul Sellers, another distinguished LJ member who put out a video on his technique for hand sharpening plane irons. If you check his blogs, he has some interesting lessons on hand sharpening. I may give his methods a try in the future, when I have a blade handy that I can feel ok about destroying before I make it better :)

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View ShipWreck's profile

ShipWreck

557 posts in 3215 days


#12 posted 05-14-2012 12:26 AM

Dave….... I have about a 1/2 dozen laying around. Want one? I bought a few “Hock” blades and used the originals for practice.

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2136 posts in 2572 days


#13 posted 05-14-2012 12:50 AM

I appreciate the offer shipwreck, but I might have a plane blade or two in a bag of unused parts I have floating around. Thank you for the thoughtful gesture. Such kindness does mean a great deal to me.

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#14 posted 05-14-2012 01:04 AM

Thanks for the great advice everyone. I may use the wetstone idea from Paul Sellers and just keep my system for those ugly blades.
I think the hardest part is trying to get a straight blade from one that has been honed improperly.
The craftsman blade was off by several degrees, which is really hard to see unless you put a square on it.

I’ve also come to the conclusion that I won’t buy anything but Stanley, and or union planes. The others, (no names) have too much play left and right when planing. They just don’t cut well at all. I’ve reconditioned several and they just seem to get worse.

I think I’ll stick to the No 5 and above for the reselling part. They are big enough to make some money, yet easier to work on. Win win.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1749 days


#15 posted 05-14-2012 01:07 AM

I feel that since I’ve gotten into planes that I haven’t made anything, but in order to make something, I need orders to come in, so I will concentrate on advertising the next several weeks. We have some papers in town, and I have my cards now.

I think with a base price of $160 before finishing, the adirondack chairs will sell. I’m thinking that an additional $40 for stain and varnish would work. The finishing takes more time than the building.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com