LumberJocks

Wood Plane Users Speak Out

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by Texchappy posted 05-13-2012 01:55 AM 1256 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Texchappy's profile

Texchappy

252 posts in 964 days


05-13-2012 01:55 AM

What wood planes do you use? Why do you like them?

I ask because I find myself drawn to them and want to use them but want some more insight from actual users.

TIA,
Tony

-- Wood is not velveeta


19 replies so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10324 posts in 1362 days


#1 posted 05-13-2012 02:03 AM

Wooden hand planes or hand planes? Bench or moulders, joinery or ?

Wooden planes says only the wood kind, with hammer taps required to set the lateral, irons, depth, etc… Any planes, lots of input! :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Texchappy's profile

Texchappy

252 posts in 964 days


#2 posted 05-13-2012 02:06 AM

Woodstock planes to be more specific – or japanese planes.

-- Wood is not velveeta

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1437 days


#3 posted 05-13-2012 02:07 AM

I love wood planes but I don’t have as many as I’d like. Smit’s asking all the right questions. I like the wood-on-wood feedback of transitionals but woodbodies feel “tall” in my hands. A nice coffin smoother is as good as it gets and the grace of a razee is pleasing to the eye. Everyone I know that owns an ECE uses it above all others. I say go for it.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1030 days


#4 posted 05-13-2012 02:33 AM

Not all planes are created equal. I’m familiar enough with them to know that a Stanley knock-off is NOT a Stanley. I have several of them and they don’t plane worth a darn.
Stick with Stanley Bailey, a good no4 and 5. If you want to use them for joinery, a no7.
Keep the cutting iron flat and sharp and go with the grain.
It’s a good feeling to see those ribbons come up.

Soon, I’ll have some for sale.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1030 days


#5 posted 05-13-2012 02:36 AM

Bertha, I like the transitionals as well, but they seem so light that they chatter if they hit a tough spot and being so high it feels like you’re not able to keep it down on the work.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1437 days


#6 posted 05-13-2012 02:36 AM

^I’m with Russell. A Stanley #7 is the stuff of Gods.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1030 days


#7 posted 05-13-2012 02:53 AM

I have a No6 coming in the mail from Ebay. I think I paid $18 for it. I have some 1 inch walnut boards I’d like to join and see how it works.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1437 days


#8 posted 05-13-2012 03:01 AM

Russell, I’m a #6 fanboy. I like that extra width and heft. I’ve never jointed with it, as it feels tippy to me on-edge, but you’re going to freak about how much you’ll like the 6.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2966 posts in 1030 days


#9 posted 05-13-2012 03:06 AM

I’m beginning to wonder if I switched my hobby to restoring planes instead of woodworking.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View ShipWreck's profile

ShipWreck

536 posts in 2496 days


#10 posted 05-13-2012 08:39 AM

Whenever I finish restoring my small fleet of Stanleys, I would really like to have a Veritas #6 Foreplane. I tried one of these for a few minutes and fell in love with it.

View 12strings's profile

12strings

433 posts in 1128 days


#11 posted 05-13-2012 11:24 AM

Here’s my arsenal of woodies: 22” OLD wooden jointer plane. Shop=made wooden scrub plane. I also have an Old Stanley #5 that I restored.

I’m still not quite good enough at the wedge-tapping to get precise blade adjustment down on the woodies, so I Generally use the scrub to rough down quicly (set with lots of camber to take a big bite); then clean it up with the Metal Jack plane (which I can control the cut better).

I like the wooden planes, but haven’t perfected blade adjustment yet.

-- I'm strictly hand-tool only...unless the power tool is faster and easier!

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2488 days


#12 posted 05-13-2012 11:46 AM

I have a Lie-Nielsen low angle block plane that I use constantly. I use my small LN and large Veritas shoulder plane alot also. I have a #4 Stanley that gets regular use and a No 113 compass plane that I use to clean up the arches that are a regular design element of my furniture.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10324 posts in 1362 days


#13 posted 05-13-2012 12:23 PM

A Sandusky jack was the first and only woodie that’s ever played nice for me. Hammer taps are not my bag; the straightforward controls (lateral, depth, frog) on Stanley planes are prefered. And the shavings stay in the deeper recessed of the woodies, too, and need to be cleared (mine, anyway)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Arch_E's profile

Arch_E

47 posts in 1265 days


#14 posted 05-13-2012 12:49 PM

Well, I’m having really good results with some of my growing number of “woodie” planes. My favorite is a moving fillister: it’s not only a beautiful old wood tool, it works great. The LV skew rabbet is better but it cost 3x more. Amazing how well the old technology can work—at a fraction of the cost. I’ve gotten one molding plane (0gee) to work well, along with several skew rabbets. Plus, one of my two try planes is fabulous; the other, a PAIN due to clogging. Perhaps the easiest to use and get great results from are a couple of Sargent transitionals (3415; 3416). The wood base flies over wood and the controls work mostly just like my Stanley/Bailey metal planes. Guess it’s easy to see that I’m hooked on planes, in general :)

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15777 posts in 2962 days


#15 posted 05-13-2012 01:17 PM

You mean you’re supposed to use these things??? I thought the fun was just in restoring them and admiring them.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase