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Plunge Cuts using Woodpecker or Incra Router Lift

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Forum topic by DFDS posted 05-04-2012 10:17 PM 1934 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DFDS

8 posts in 1906 days


05-04-2012 10:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plungecut routerlift plunge router

I’m considering alternative router lift options and want to know your experience on the following:

Can you make plunge cuts with either Woodpeckers Precision Router Lift V2 or Incra’s Mast-R-Lift II ?

- If no plunge cutting is possible, how quickly can you raise the bit in order to make incremental passes?


Does the router need to be turned off in order to raise and lower?

And, does this set up stay completely square through out cutting when the lock feature is engaged?

Can go light on the lock feature to reduce the amount of time it takes to raise the bit?

Anyone else have experiential feedback on these questions?

*I already own the MLCS PowerLift, so my questions only apply to Manual Lift Systems.

Thanks!

Dustin


7 replies so far

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Loren

8313 posts in 3113 days


#1 posted 05-04-2012 10:50 PM

Dunno about those, but you should know about this
option, which probably emulates the pneumatic plunge
of pin routers better than precision-oriented screw lift.

http://www.veritastools.com/products/Page.aspx?p=202

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DFDS

8 posts in 1906 days


#2 posted 05-04-2012 10:59 PM

Thanks Loren, I have not seen that set up before. Although one sided mount seems like it may make the bit tilt.

Based on my experience with my lift, I’m becoming more adamant about precision and eliminating bit movement. Seems like some guys don’t care about being off 1/64”, but I do.

You’ve used this lever lift before?

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Loren

8313 posts in 3113 days


#3 posted 05-04-2012 11:18 PM

No, but I do have a pin router. The plungebars on plunge routers
do a pretty good job in terms of accuracy – I think I saw an
arrangement at some time where a guy had a bottle jack under
the plunge router to push it up.

You also might look at the Woodrat plunge bar for ideas.

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DFDS

8 posts in 1906 days


#4 posted 05-04-2012 11:40 PM

Ok Ok, Good to hear. I’m actually more interested in a pro-grade inverted pin router like CR Onsrud makes. What pin router do you run?

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Loren

8313 posts in 3113 days


#5 posted 05-04-2012 11:59 PM

I have a Delta/Invicta topside pin router. Powerful machine…
about 6-10 HP compared to a 3 HP handheld router though
only rated at 2 HP.

View John Little's profile

John Little

32 posts in 1709 days


#6 posted 05-05-2012 12:46 AM

I have a Woodpecker PRL V2 and I suppose you could do inverted plunge cuts, but there are a couple of things you need to know. First in the fine adjust mode you only have about 3/4” of range to move up or down and it is a slow process of raising or lowering the router. Second, if you have the thumb wheel version as I have the workpeice will probably cover the thumb wheel so you can’t use it. If you have the crank version you may be able to do it, but again you are limited by the 3/4” range. Call Woodpeckers and talk to them. They are good people and will answer your questions.

-- John Little, ToyMakers of East Lake

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DFDS

8 posts in 1906 days


#7 posted 05-05-2012 04:48 AM

Cool thanks again Loren.

Thanks John for the feedback. This is the type of info I’m looking for. Of course manufactures have info, but I’ve found direct user experience is the best…it’s not like pulling teeth. Not everyone enjoys talking about what their product can Not do. And, in regard of liability, most are reluctant to talk about atypical tool use.

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