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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 05-03-2012 07:10 PM 1557 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1748 days


05-03-2012 07:10 PM

This is the first planer I bought. It was in an antique store in Jamesport Mo. $18
It’s a Stanley no35 Smooth plane 9”L, 2”W, 3 1/4lbs, 1870-1942.

I’ve taken it apart and cleaned and filed some grime away. The wood has no splits, and the metal no pits. Looks like it’s been kept warm and dry for a lot of years.

I use it all the time, it and my Stanley No5.

Found this verbiage with the pic.
This smoothing plane, as well as the #36, has a tote. How can this plane, whose length is equal to the #23, have a tote whereas the #23 can’t? It’s simple – this plane is designed with a step, often called a razee, at its rear. The wood is stepped down, and the cast iron frame is made to follow the step. This design increased the amount of space directly behind and under the cutter, making it possible to equip the plane with a tote. It was a very popular feature, making this transitional smoother one of the most commonly encoutered.

Check the cast iron frame, where it steps down for any signs of repairs or cracks. This area is prone to breakage, as is the overhang onto which the tote fastens.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


11 replies so far

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4151 posts in 2413 days


#1 posted 05-03-2012 07:14 PM

I have a No 35 plane as well. I call it my ugly duckling plane, because it sort of reminds me of a duck. I hope you enjoy yours!

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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kaschimer

89 posts in 1851 days


#2 posted 05-03-2012 08:48 PM

Hey! that looks like one I have as well. Just restored it to good working order

-- Steve, Michigan - "Every piece of work is a self portrait of the person who accomplished it - autograph your work with excellence!" - Author unknown

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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2942 days


#3 posted 05-03-2012 08:51 PM

Great job…thats a nice looking plane.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1748 days


#4 posted 05-03-2012 08:52 PM

It’s a good planer. I sharpened the blade and took it apart and cleaned everything. Sanded the base down flat. It will curl some cigarette paper when it gets into a groove.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1748 days


#5 posted 05-03-2012 08:55 PM

Lowering the handle does get more of your shoulder into the thrust, but the lower angle also allows for some chatter if it hits a snag. There is less downward pressure in favor of forward pressure. If the handle where just a bit higher it might improve it.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17960 posts in 2029 days


#6 posted 05-03-2012 09:16 PM

I have several transitionals including the 35. I don’t use them much. Glad to see it being used.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1748 days


#7 posted 05-03-2012 09:18 PM

I have a bid on a Stanley No3 right now for $18. I need to get my blade sharpening set up.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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Bill White

4450 posts in 3422 days


#8 posted 05-03-2012 09:50 PM

I’m a plane nut, and would love to have one like that.
Get after it. Plane some wood and let us know how it works.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View james04's profile

james04

8 posts in 2835 days


#9 posted 05-03-2012 10:39 PM

Nice find.

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Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2576 days


#10 posted 05-03-2012 10:58 PM

great job on the refurb :-)

Dennis

View Martyroc's profile

Martyroc

2712 posts in 1767 days


#11 posted 05-04-2012 01:40 AM

Looks good Russ, treated right these last forever.

-- Martin ....always count the number of fingers you have before, and after using the saw.

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