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Table saw arbor lubrication

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Forum topic by TomFran posted 05-01-2012 01:44 PM 2862 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TomFran

2942 posts in 2661 days


05-01-2012 01:44 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw table saw bearing lube

My son just bought an old Sears table saw, and I believe the arbor bearings need some lubrication. I was wondering what would be the best product to use on this? Do any of you have a recommendation for arbor lube?

Thanks!

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28


22 replies so far

View therookie's profile

therookie

887 posts in 1494 days


#1 posted 05-01-2012 01:49 PM

Well if the bearings are making noise and the saw is older then you might need to replace the bearings. Because most of the time the bearings are sealed and you cant lube them. Just my 2 cents.

-- http://aewoodworks.webs.com

View Greg..the Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5142 posts in 1975 days


#2 posted 05-01-2012 01:51 PM

Wouldn’t the bearing on a table saw motor be sealed to prevent dust?

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TomFran

2942 posts in 2661 days


#3 posted 05-01-2012 01:54 PM

The manual that came with the saw (yes, the manual was actually saved), says that the bearings can be and should be lubricated.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View therookie's profile

therookie

887 posts in 1494 days


#4 posted 05-01-2012 01:55 PM

Then you must be talking about the outside surfaces of the bearing and i have never seen a saw with this… could you post a pic of the bearing?

-- http://aewoodworks.webs.com

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1850 days


#5 posted 05-01-2012 01:59 PM

Since the manual calls for lubricant then it should specify what type of lubricant. If it doesn’t then you should use a dry spray lubricant.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2661 days


#6 posted 05-01-2012 02:46 PM

RetiredCoastie,

That’s true that the manual would specify what to use, but I was wondering if there is a better product for lubricating bearings today than there was 60 years ago when this saw was made.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 2129 days


#7 posted 05-01-2012 02:55 PM

Replace the bearings

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1735 days


#8 posted 05-01-2012 03:01 PM

Why do you think that the bearings need lubed? If they aren’t noisy or dragging, they’re probably fine. If you must lube them, I agree with Coastie about using a dry spray lubricant.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2661 days


#9 posted 05-01-2012 05:37 PM

OK, guys, thanks for the input. I do appreciate your advice!

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 2129 days


#10 posted 05-01-2012 09:04 PM

The average life span of a sealed ball bearing is about 25 years. Being that the bearings are older than that I would replace them. If for nothing else peace of mind. The grease in the bearing, if there is any left, is going to be hard dried out and not able to lubricate anything. If you have to go through the hassle of removing the arbor why not just put new bearings in? To me, its a no brainer.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2661 days


#11 posted 05-01-2012 09:20 PM

Is it that easy to replace bearings in table saw arbors? Don’t they have to be pressed out with special tools?

And, are bearings for 60 year old saws easy to locate?

If it is something the average guy can do, and the bearings are available, then I agree wholeheartedly about replacement.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 2364 days


#12 posted 05-01-2012 09:35 PM

Sorry buddy but sears tools = junk

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1850 days


#13 posted 05-01-2012 09:39 PM

A lot would depend on hours of operation, the environment in which the saw was exposed to and the most important thing would be run-out on the arbor. This can be checked very easily with a dial indicator or even a straight edge and feeler gauges. The old adage applies ” IF IT’S NOT BROKE DON’T FIX IT ”. Unless the saw has seen heavy use I would think it would be good to go.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2661 days


#14 posted 05-01-2012 09:46 PM

That is good advice. I’ll tell my son to check it for the run-out.

I believe he can get to the bearings without much problem, and so maybe some of the dry lubricant you mentioned in an earlier post might be all that’s necessary.

Thanks a bunch!

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View Scot's profile

Scot

344 posts in 2063 days


#15 posted 05-01-2012 09:46 PM

Arbor bearings are easy to change but most people may not have a bearing press. But most auto shops do and some auto parts store do. Before I got my own bearing press I would just go to the local NAPA auto parts, I get my bearings there too, and they press them on for free.

I always get sealed bearing with metal side shields. They are lubed for life.

-- If the old masters had power tools, they would have used them. So get off your damn High Horse.

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