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Help Choosing Joinery for First Project

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Forum topic by Texchappy posted 815 days ago 892 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Texchappy

252 posts in 816 days


815 days ago

First woodworking project period and I plan to do a utilitarian piece – a box for my old Torque wrench. From the advice given me on another thread, I think I’m going to use poplar. My next decision is how to join it up. I thought about doing dovetails but I’m not sure that isn’t too much of a leap for my first project. Not sure I’d want to do a simple miter or butt joint either.

So what would you recommend for joinery for a first project? Also need to figure out bottom and lid so ideas on that would be helpful tool.

I will be doing this by hand. I’d like to do something like this bot not sure I could do it at first: http://www.daikudojo.org/Archive/howtos/20070224_toolbox/

-- Wood is not velveeta


19 replies so far

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Craftsman on the lake

2362 posts in 2033 days


#1 posted 815 days ago

Finger joints look good on a box, especially a longer one and are doable for a first time joinery project.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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BTimmons

2076 posts in 1080 days


#2 posted 815 days ago

Get the poplar and try a few practice joints, perhaps different types as well. That way when you’re ready to tackle the toolbox (which shouldn’t be too long), you’ll go into the project with more skills and confidence.

-- Brian Timmons, Big T Woodworks - https://www.etsy.com/shop/BigTWW - http://vimeo.com/98821147

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David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1593 days


#3 posted 815 days ago

Hand cut finger joints and those through tenons on the link are a lot harder to make come out nicely than dovetails. Dovetails are a lot more forgiving. Just watch some videos.

Paul Sellers does a good job explaining:

Make sure your stock is square. Layout carefully and take your time. Use a knife line to lay out. Clearly mark which is waste and what stock stays. Keep clear of the lines when removing waste. Pare carefully to line with the chisel. Do a couple practice runs first on some scrap stock.

You will mess up a few times. You will cut the tails and leave the waste a few times. You will cut them backwards a couple times. Don’t worry about it and after a few sets, it will become second nature.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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Texchappy

252 posts in 816 days


#4 posted 815 days ago

Thanks for the ideas. I might just give dovetails a try – been watching videos for 2-3 days on doing them. Hadn’t seen the Sellers video so thanks for that.

Any ideas for the lid and bottom other than just butt jointing (?) it to the bottom and top (with a couple of cleat boards)?

-- Wood is not velveeta

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ShipWreck

536 posts in 2348 days


#5 posted 815 days ago

Good luck and have fun with whatever you decide Tex :)

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Texchappy

252 posts in 816 days


#6 posted 815 days ago

From watching that videos and others – Alright, so it should take me about ten minutes – no problem ;)

-- Wood is not velveeta

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David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1593 days


#7 posted 815 days ago

Small boxes, you can nail and glue flush, rabbet, or groove for a thinner panel. Larger stuff gets a bit more complicated- but not much.

Paul’s video goes through the whole process. Will be a great starting place.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1593 days


#8 posted 815 days ago

Texchappy,

No, the first one will take as much as all day. When you see them do it in 10 minutes, you get that fast after the first thousand. ;)

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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waho6o9

4744 posts in 1172 days


#9 posted 814 days ago

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Texchappy

252 posts in 816 days


#10 posted 814 days ago

waho6o9: that looks a lot like what I’m after. Are those half-lap joints on the corner? I like the look of the sliding lip but wasn’t sure how to do it with out plane of some sort to cut out the groove.

-- Wood is not velveeta

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waho6o9

4744 posts in 1172 days


#11 posted 814 days ago

I think they’re called rabbit joints. You can chisel the grove for the sliding top. It will give you good practice and you will learn about grain and the sharpening of your chisels.
You can do it.

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Texchappy

252 posts in 816 days


#12 posted 814 days ago

Thanks waho6o9. So bench chisel to remove the majority and then pare (?) it out. I only ordered a 1/4” bench chisel, can I use it for the paring or is this a case of the right tool for the right job for the right result.

-- Wood is not velveeta

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waho6o9

4744 posts in 1172 days


#13 posted 814 days ago

Your welcome Texchappy.

Yes, take your time and don’t smack the slot (1/4” dado) too hard or it will split the board. I am an expert at that.

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Texchappy

252 posts in 816 days


#14 posted 809 days ago

What thickness of board should I use for this project?

-- Wood is not velveeta

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

4744 posts in 1172 days


#15 posted 809 days ago

Let’s see. Your torque wrench is not too heavy. So, I would suggest 3/4 ply or 3/4 softwood as you will be using hand tools from what I understand.
Or, 1/2 poplar might suffice, and hopefully it wouldn’t be to difficult to work with hand tools.
Maybe others might suggest a different type of wood as well.
4/4 ( four quarter ) lumber would be more than enough.

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