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Forum topic by Peter5 posted 825 days ago 1318 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Peter5

61 posts in 1407 days


825 days ago

A couple years ago, I was given free reign of my wife’s grandpa’s garage after he had passed away. Her grandpa was not any kind of serious woodworker that I know of, but he was somewhat of a tool hoarder and had also taken on some estates of some of his friends before he passed. So I gleefully took all kinds of tools that I knew I could use- bar clamps, hand saws, sand paper, etc. I also took a small smattering of planes, figuring that I might find a use for them and/or learn that they’re worth some money one day. Now that I’ve been reading how everyone here is obsessed with planes, I thought I should get them out, dust them off, and find out if I have anything good. And if I do, I think I’ll clean them up and try to learn how to use them. So I have pictures here of the five planes that I took (I’m kicking myself because he had at least 10 more that I did not take…*). The three narrow ones seem to be for rabbiting or rounding over, which I’m guessing will be less than practical since the advent of modern routers. But the other two seem to have promise. The smaller of the two block planes says “New York Tool Co” on it and also has a number 3. The bigger one does not have any writing that I could find. Do I have anything good? And if so, what’s the quickest way to get off and running with these?

-- Pete, Long Beach, CA http://www.furniturebypete.blogspot.com


17 replies so far

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dbray45

2482 posts in 1380 days


#1 posted 825 days ago

Get out the BLO and start putting the oils back into the wood. You will be amazed at what you have – clean them up and sharpen them an you will have some nice planes.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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a1Jim

112001 posts in 2180 days


#2 posted 825 days ago

IMO all planes are good. As far as dollar value ,I don’t think the’res any thing high dollor there. If you look on Ebay you can get a feel for what planes go for .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Peter5

61 posts in 1407 days


#3 posted 825 days ago

Thanks guys. What does the number 3 refer to? Is that related to the angle of the blade? And David, what is BLO?

-- Pete, Long Beach, CA http://www.furniturebypete.blogspot.com

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ChrisK

1041 posts in 1685 days


#4 posted 825 days ago

BLO: Boiled Linseed Oil

Some info on planes http://workshop.tjmahaffey.com/planes1.php

-- Chris K

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bandit571

6688 posts in 1286 days


#5 posted 825 days ago

i think the smaller plane is a #3 sized smoother plane. The longer one looks like either a #26 jack plane transitional style. The wood body looks like it has seen better days, though. maybe get with Don W, and see about crafting a new body for it???

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1601 days


#6 posted 825 days ago

BLO = Boiled Linseed Oil

The little coffin smoother should probably clean up ok. The transitional (wood block with metal adjuster and stuff on top) might clean up ok without a lot of work. If I am correct just off the top of my head, I think it is a Stanley #27 (or more likely the Union equivalent but can’t tell from picture) You can see some really pretty ones in the Studley Toolchest.

The wooden molding planes are going to be hard if you have missing irons (and maybe boxing in one of them – again, hard to tell from pictures). If you have the space, put them on a shelf until you get more experience restoring stuff. They don’t look too far gone but it will take some expertise.

As far as value, nothing of great rarity or particularly collectible. Just good solid planes.

Don’t underestimate molding planes compared to routers. Many times you can cut a profile with a plane before someone is done inserting a bit in a router, setting the depth, plugging it in.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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dbray45

2482 posts in 1380 days


#7 posted 825 days ago

All of the wood planes were treated with linseed oil into the 1950s or 60s. Once the wood starts to dry out the wood will crack. Adding several thin coats and letting it soak into the planes the bodies will look and feel much better – do not sand the soles of these planes and if you have to sharpen the blades, do this carefully. As David said, do not underestimate what these planes can and will do for you. THey can cut a profile before you can find the router wrench in the drawer.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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Don W

14661 posts in 1171 days


#8 posted 824 days ago

yep, clean ‘em up and put them to work. All good advice above. The profile on the molder looks like it might be a step nosing plane. Its for making stair treads.

The coffin plane (named due to its shape obvoiusly) is a smoother. It sure beats sanding in my book.

I agree with Bandit, the transitional, looks like a #26 or #27 and will make a pretty good jack plane.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Peter5

61 posts in 1407 days


#9 posted 824 days ago

OK, let me ask a criminally stupid question- what do you mean by “smoothing” exactly? Obviously it would have the same effect as sanding (given your usage of the word), but are we talking about removing a lot of material here (substituting for a belt sander perhaps) or for a finish sanding or both?

Also, I noticed on the so-called Jack plane that there are two blades facing each other- again a stupid question: sharpen both, right?

-- Pete, Long Beach, CA http://www.furniturebypete.blogspot.com

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1296 days


#10 posted 824 days ago

I think they’re all desirable. I really love little coffin smoothers myself. You done good.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Don W

14661 posts in 1171 days


#11 posted 824 days ago

Pete, to answer your smoothing question, it depends on the plane and how its tuned. You can take shaving so thin you can see threw them if its tuned well enough. If you need to remove more material, you can lower the blade and take thicker shaving.

Scroll through this thread, you’ll see lots of “shavings” shots.

Look about halfway down this page there is a description of plane parts. You only sharpen the iron, but the cap iron must be tuned (could be refer to as sharpening i guess) so it fits snug. Unlike the iron, this is only done once to the cap iron, the iron is sharpened when ever it needs it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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sikrap

989 posts in 1962 days


#12 posted 824 days ago

Pete, a “smoother” is called that because its used for a finished surface, ready for stain, poly, whatever. Those should be able to be turned into good users, but I don’t think there’s anything there worth a whole lot of money.

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

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dbray45

2482 posts in 1380 days


#13 posted 824 days ago

Peter – It is better to ask questions and get real answers than take 5 years to figure it out.

Smoothing planes, like Don said, give you a finished surface, sandpaper finishes are not smooth until you get down to 600 grit and then you start to burnish the wood (then you burn it) if you are using a power tool.

Once you sharpen the the blade, to set it, set the plane on a flat piece of plywood, slide a regular piece of paper under the front of the plane, put the blade in and set the wedge. If this is too much of a cut – which probably is, gently tap the back or heel of the plane to back the blade, tap the front to make the cut a little more aggressive. I always put a piece of scrap against the back of the plane so the hammer or mallet doesn’t mess up the plane.

I also gently round the corners of the blade so the corners don’t catch the wood.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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dbray45

2482 posts in 1380 days


#14 posted 824 days ago

One more note – I have found that it is far easier to take 20 light cuts than 2 or 3 heavy ones. If you can almost see through the shavings, to me – its a heavy cut. This way, if you are going the wrong way on the grain and it starts to pull or dig into the wood, you don’t do a lot of damage.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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Don W

14661 posts in 1171 days


#15 posted 824 days ago

and yet another note, using hand planes, sharpening, tuning, deciding which one to use, which one to buy, how to adjust it, is fun but can be intimidating at first. Take one, and as David mentioned, ask questions, and figure it out, then move on to the next.

I’ve been woodworking in some form or another for about 40 years, and these guys have still taught me a lot.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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