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Forum topic by Loren posted 04-25-2012 05:20 PM 1181 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


04-25-2012 05:20 PM

Here’s a bookbinding press I recently acquired. I estimate it
weighs around 800 lbs assembled. I can barely deadlift the
top section. I figure I can lift about 250 lbs in a deadlift but
perhaps I am underestimating my own strength. I cannot
deadlift the base.

Taking it apart to move was a big hassle and I ached for
a few days from the exertions. Reassembly required a
1 ton hoist to lift the top 8 feet overhead and lower onto
the vertical rods. Overall the press is about 7 feet tall.

After the top and bottom were joined with the rods I
lifted the screw into place with the hoist and a scissor jack
underneath to apply pressure from the bottom to keep
it from swinging on the hoist while I got the bolts in.
The boxes were put in the clamp and the platten slid from
a cart onto the top box, then the screw lowered to
engage the hole in the platten and the retaining ring
installed.

Lot of head scratching figuring out how to put this thing
back together. I have vacuum veneering gear but
I thought this would open up some possibilities and
of course it runs silently.


9 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2153 days


#1 posted 04-25-2012 05:22 PM

That thing is friggin awesome!!! That chest looks uncomfortable:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2310 days


#2 posted 04-25-2012 06:44 PM

Cast Iron Envy. It’s an ugly thing.

The press? It is beautiful. What a great score, Loren!

And think of the weekend applications:

“You want a thinner tortilla? Here, hand it to me, I can do that…”

“That shirt looks a little wrinkled…”

“I don’t think my carry on is going to fit in the overhead, but wait….”

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

8726 posts in 1900 days


#3 posted 04-25-2012 07:36 PM

That is so cool Loren! Congrats.

-- ~Tony

View 489tad's profile

489tad

3098 posts in 2471 days


#4 posted 04-26-2012 02:47 AM

That would be a great bent wood lamination press. Save on clamps.

-- Dan, Naperville IL, I.G.N.

View Loren's profile

Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#5 posted 04-26-2012 03:05 AM

Yeah Dan. I’m thinking it could open up some possibilities. So
does vacuum bag clamping, but the bag cauls have to be shaped
carefully so as not to tear the bag, while with a mechanical
press I should be able to pound wedges in while the clamp is
engaged and things like. I’m excited about the prospects of
making laminated shapes without investing a lot of time in
making perfect forms to shape them with the vacuum method.

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 2240 days


#6 posted 04-26-2012 11:17 AM

Loren that’s an amazing piece, any idea of the vintage ?
I forsee lots of great things being flattened !

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2310 days


#7 posted 04-26-2012 03:14 PM

Glen, we can get some idea of the vintage of the tool just by researching its function. It was used in times past to construct things we called, at the time,l “books”.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Loren's profile

Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#8 posted 04-26-2012 03:30 PM

This style of cast iron press dates back to at least the
1880 if not before, but my guess is this clamp may be
as recently manufactured as the 1940s or 50s. It belonged
to the school district (there’s a sticker on it) and must have
been liquidated when they closed the last of the typesetting
and printing programs. It was brought to a book restorers
shop about 20 years ago.

If book presses interest you there is a website where several
styles are featured at:
http://www.binderytools.com/catalog/book-presses

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 2240 days


#9 posted 04-27-2012 11:48 AM

Nice retrospective look Lee..Kindly has an “edge”..;-)
Loren, I’m in awe of that big boy, and the muscle power and A35 25 it must have taken along with the
heavy equipment to set him up !

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

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