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Forum topic by JP Madren posted 04-25-2012 02:51 PM 858 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JP Madren

6 posts in 980 days


04-25-2012 02:51 PM

I am fixin’ to start making a wooden kitchen tool that I have been approved a US Patent on (used as a stirring/flipping/scraping, etc tool) and need to find out “what kind of machinery/cutting tool I will need to cut a 1/4 (or slightly wider) slot in a flat piece of wood that’s around 1/4 inch thick?” It will be important that it can cut cleanly without splinterring, while being controllable at the same. To see one of the tools so you’ll have a better idea of what I am talking about I have it on a website (item is currently not for sale – so I’m not trying to sell anything here – just get some info so that I can manufacture it correctly myself) ...it’s on www.Kitchenstick.com. I know there’s a bunch of guys on here that know their craft and the best tools for the job and that “best tool” is what I want to find. ...thanks – jp madren

-- If I can't help you I won't hurt you


13 replies so far

View Jorge G.'s profile

Jorge G.

1526 posts in 1142 days


#1 posted 04-25-2012 02:57 PM

If you are good with a hand saw, use a japanese dozuki, if not then use the Bridge City Tools joint maker pro, expensive but you will make the cuts in no time and very precise.

-- To surrender a dream leaves life as it is — and not as it could be.

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a1Jim

112170 posts in 2244 days


#2 posted 04-25-2012 02:59 PM

It’s hard to tell with out seeing photos but perhaps a router mounted on a shop made fixture.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1201 posts in 963 days


#3 posted 04-25-2012 03:52 PM

Scrollsaw with an extremely fine blade.

View jdmaher's profile

jdmaher

281 posts in 1246 days


#4 posted 04-25-2012 03:55 PM

Looks like plunge rout through a 8/4 chunk, rout slot to and through the edge; that’s a pretty simple CNC router operation (you could probably round over one end at the same setup). THEN, cut individual sticks out of the chunk, and bevel the ends.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1360 days


#5 posted 04-25-2012 04:06 PM

You might get by with a laminate trimmer (router) like the Bosch Colt (<$100) and a shopmade jig. If you want to throw big bucks at it, you could probably use a Festool Domino. Although an expensive route, Jim brings up a good point. If you’re going to be building a ton of them, the CNC is a consideration.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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JP Madren

6 posts in 980 days


#6 posted 04-25-2012 04:06 PM

Thanks to both of you. I have talked to a couple of people used to working with wood tools (modern stuff instead of the primitive tools I use making my Doughbowls) ... and a “router table” has come up a few times. I knew that there’s so many visiting this site with a wide variety of interests/knowledge and I am wanting to get what I need the “1st time” and figured you guys would know how to get it done. I’ll have no other use for the tool other than cutting out this “notch” which will simply be used to pull out or push in hot oven racks. The sticks that will be in production are going to be a quarter inch wider than the ones seen on the video with the oven rack notch 4” from the end. The making/shaping of the product will all be done in stages starting with cutting the log into long stips at my sawmill and by having no automation – time is my biggest enemy so having good (safe) equipment to work will be important.

-- If I can't help you I won't hurt you

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1360 days


#7 posted 04-25-2012 04:07 PM

^I like the Bosch Colt even more for this now.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1087 days


#8 posted 04-25-2012 04:16 PM

A 5 ton punch press and a progressive die would make super quick work of these on a mass-production scale.
Progressive dies would allow for continuous processing of the item from log to packaging.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View waho6o9's profile (online now)

waho6o9

4982 posts in 1243 days


#9 posted 04-25-2012 04:33 PM

+1 for the Festool Domino. It’ll cut clean slots with no splintering.

Good luck on your endeavors.

View darinS's profile

darinS

385 posts in 1534 days


#10 posted 04-25-2012 06:58 PM

I’ll toss out the obvious answer. If you are using 8/4 stock (per Jim in post #4), why not set up a 1/4 inch dado blade? If there is some splintering on the back side, maybe try to arrange the slices so that you have just a little left over so you can get rid of the splintered part.

Hope that makes sense. I’m not so sure I can follow it, and I wrote it.

Best of luck.

-- If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you!

View Doss's profile

Doss

779 posts in 931 days


#11 posted 04-25-2012 09:17 PM

Yeah, i’d say start off with some wide stock, dado it (or route it), and then slice it into sticks.

This seems to be something you’d be better off automating for repeatability and speed. That’s just me though.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

View Don W's profile

Don W

15060 posts in 1234 days


#12 posted 04-25-2012 09:24 PM

cut the slot with a dado blade before cutting the 1/4 thick slats.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1087 days


#13 posted 04-25-2012 09:28 PM

cutting an angled dado in thick material and following with a ball end mill for the rounded profile, then slicing the chunk into the 1/4” sticks could be one aqpproach.

I’d use an auto-feeder so the dado and the ball mill run as a single continuous operation for efficiency.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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