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Resaw help

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Forum topic by Tom Coster posted 823 days ago 1302 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tom Coster

120 posts in 1437 days


823 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: resaw

This seems like a stupid question to me but I might be missing something so I have to ask. Is there any way to resaw a 14.75” board? I have scored 2.75” X 14.75” X 16’ mahogany (assume African) boards that I want to split and use as cabinet doors with bread board ends. I really, really do not want to rip, resaw and re-glue. Although the doors will probably be more stable if I rip them the thought of keeping up with so many matching boards makes my head hurt.

-- Tom, MI, SC


12 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7235 posts in 2247 days


#1 posted 823 days ago

You can do it on a big band saw sold for that. You can
also do it by hand with a bow saw.

Your boards will probably distort after resawing and the
advantage of resawing such wide boards is generally
lost due to cupping in my opinion, but you can do it
if you like. If the idea of managing twice as many boards
makes your head hurt I wonder what the price tag on
a machine with a 15” resaw capacity will do to you.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Joseph Jossem's profile

Joseph Jossem

344 posts in 867 days


#2 posted 823 days ago

try a local millwork shop with a resaw

Price tag is 5 years of payments and a arm and leg..

View Tom Coster's profile

Tom Coster

120 posts in 1437 days


#3 posted 823 days ago

Loren, good point! the pain my wife would inflict if I bought another tool. Because these boards have been kiln dried and have a very low moisture level I was hoping to resaw the 2.75 and allow to air dry for a few weeks then plane the resulting boards to 3/4s. I was hoping this would account for any cupping. But on the other hand I would hate to be wrong and ruin what for me is a rare score of mahogany.

-- Tom, MI, SC

View ELCfinefurniture's profile

ELCfinefurniture

112 posts in 919 days


#4 posted 823 days ago

Band saw.
Put on a heavy duty blade to handle the load and try this….kerf the board on the table saw as deep as you can. This puts far less stress on the band saw and it provides a channel for the bandsaw blade to ride in. Be very carefull of reactionary wood when resawing wood of that large a dimension. You wouldnt want it to pop on you.

-- {Current North Bennet street school student}

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Tom Coster

120 posts in 1437 days


#5 posted 823 days ago

Pono, I am in the Myrtle Beach area and have been unable to find anyone with a big enough saw, except for local sawyers who mill for pallet material. I would not trust them to get it right.

-- Tom, MI, SC

View Tom Coster's profile

Tom Coster

120 posts in 1437 days


#6 posted 823 days ago

My band saw is a post WW II Delta 14” so the resaw is just a bit over 6”. I could install an riser block and I’ll need a new motor but still not tall enough. Plus now Loren has got me more worried about cupping.

-- Tom, MI, SC

View Brian Strothcamp's profile

Brian Strothcamp

110 posts in 1292 days


#7 posted 823 days ago

cupping will be dependant on how its sawn… if its quarter sawn, it shouldnt cup on you
read your endgrain and saw accordingly!

View Tom Coster's profile

Tom Coster

120 posts in 1437 days


#8 posted 823 days ago

I think I am dealing with one tree here, cut dried & banded together. All with mixed end grain direction. I bought from a guy in N.C. that claims he got it from a US Customs auction. Milled smooth and is very dry. My wife wants perfectly smooth door fronts. Easier to care for. So I figure bread board ends are the way to go. With mahogany the golden rays need to line up so I the less ripping the better. But cupping could destroy the whole project…

-- Tom, MI, SC

View Joseph Jossem's profile

Joseph Jossem

344 posts in 867 days


#9 posted 823 days ago

If the lumber was dried properly shouldnt be a problem sounds like the log was boule cut so the middle boards will have the most straight grain but still the heart.One option cut as much quarterswan out and resaw that down to size.I make solid cabinet doors veener doors frame and panel and everything between. main thing is drying and grain selection.

Yes always hard to find someone you trust to cut the lumber some of my customers stand behind me breathing down my neck.

View Tom Coster's profile

Tom Coster

120 posts in 1437 days


#10 posted 823 days ago

pono, beautiful cabs. What finish did you use?

-- Tom, MI, SC

View Loren's profile

Loren

7235 posts in 2247 days


#11 posted 823 days ago

I would look at using inset battens on the backs of the doors
to keep them flat. This approach does leave end grain exposed
so you do need to finish it well. The battens can be dovetailed
into the doors and pegged in the center if you want a highly
craftsmanlike appearance. The appearance from the front
will be more modern and clean, like Pono’s veneered example.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Joseph Jossem's profile

Joseph Jossem

344 posts in 867 days


#12 posted 823 days ago

That house was ocean front so a boat finish I think it was epiphanes if I remember right costs 80 a small can super expensive and has to be hand done sucks.If it isnt going to be in the sunlight I use laquer nothing beats it as far as easy and durable.You can lay a amazing coat even with those small portable systems from woodcraft.

All depends on the client or your intrests and desires.I cut cants and resaw them. Veneer across the line from left to right of the kitchen ,batroom etc unfold the tree to see the grain.Veneer is good if there is not much wood available

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