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Advice on running a set of kitchen doors with Arch profiles

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Forum topic by Jerry posted 04-19-2012 01:52 AM 1228 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


04-19-2012 01:52 AM

I have avoided building arched doors for any customers so far. A few jobs we have bought doors from other shops when arches are requested. Typically we build all of our doors. In the future it may get to a point where out sourcing our doors will be for the best but at this time we have more time then money.

So our current customer is being difficult with me and has placed me in a difficult position. The job is large and all complete except for the upper doors, which are to be arched. The customer has an 8000.00 balance with me but tells me to finish and they will pay the balance. So I find myself in a tight spot trying to get these arched doors built. I plan to purchase the frame and panel master from Woodcraft and build the doors ourselves.

Any advice on the best and most efficient process to build these arched doors.

My plan of action at this time will be to:

1. do everything as normal regarding our door process except

2. using patter, trace out arch

3. bandsaw proud of cutout

4. using panel and frame master, use pattern bit I will finish trim to exact dimension

5. Then run my panels and arched rails using starting pin and panel and frame master clamp.

Any quick and efficient suggestions anyone can add. Thanks, Jerry

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net


11 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7832 posts in 2402 days


#1 posted 04-19-2012 02:11 AM

I can understand your concerns if you’ve never done them before,
but it’s really not hard. Just go methodically and mill some extra
stock in case you get blowout or other screw-up. Once you get
it figured out and you have your tools and jigs at hand you’ll find
you can probably do the whole run of arches in a couple of hours.

You might want to use freshly sharpened cutters to raise your
panels. You’ll probably go slower when milling the curves and
you may have some burning. If you want to reduce sanding
do the final passes only taking off a small amount of wood.

If I were doing a lot of these I might set up 2 or 3 router tables
with the same panel raising cutter at different heights. That way
you can leave the jig on the part and make your cuts in succession.
Of course maybe digital height gauges can substitute. If you
are using shaper spindle panel raisers the cost might be prohibitive.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#2 posted 04-19-2012 02:14 AM

Thanks Loren, I am looking forward to the new experience, I am sure we will do fine. It seems I can always count on you for good feedback. Thanks

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Fuzzy's profile

Fuzzy

293 posts in 2743 days


#3 posted 04-19-2012 02:51 AM

They’re not at all difficult to do, once you get the hang of it … very flat learning curve.

Wish you were closer … I have a full set from another supplier you could borrow before investing in tooling, just in case you don’t like it.

-- - dabbling in sarcasm is foolish … if you’re not proficient at it, you end up looking stupid … ... ...

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2698 posts in 2041 days


#4 posted 04-19-2012 01:52 PM

Jerry, While we do that on a large scale with production jigs, you should be able to pull it off.
Could you send me pictures of the frame and panel master. I would love to help, but I’m not sure how to modify my method into something you can use. It sounds like you are on the right track.

Let me know how I can help.
Kent

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View Bsmith's profile

Bsmith

318 posts in 1425 days


#5 posted 04-19-2012 05:22 PM

Jerry, go to this link at Woodgears. He has a video about building arches.

-- Bryan

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#6 posted 04-19-2012 11:32 PM

Kent, Here is the pics of the jig and templates I have:

Bryan, thanks for the web site, it looks like it is full of knowledge.

Jonathan, I am still fairly new to business. Starting on the side in 2008, then going full time in 2010. So lesson learned but I did not set forth a payment schedule in the contract. I have done that in the past with other customers. I have never had this issue with any other customer. I know I discussed with them verbally how I work the payment schedule, as I do with all of my customers. I typically request 1/2 down, then 1/2 of balance at installation and the balance after completion and punch list completed. If the customer would have done the 1/2 down and then 1/2 of balance at install, then the job would be finished right now because I would have out sourced the upper arched doors and so there would have been no delay as those would have been finished and installed a few weeks ago. With all this said, I don’t worry about the pay as I am pretty sure they are fair and honest.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1563 days


#7 posted 04-20-2012 03:17 AM

Boy Jerry, I too wish you were closer. I really hope you dont buy those toys from woodcraft. I wont even begin to give linstructions for this on the computer but I am approx 5 hrs north of you. If you can get up here I ll show you the way I do it and yu can get back home the same day if your only talking 20-30 doors. Or I can ship to you pretty quickly. pm for info. if I can help you JB

View Loren's profile

Loren

7832 posts in 2402 days


#8 posted 04-20-2012 05:06 AM

I recommend 50% down. 40% on completion before it leaves your
shop. Final 10% on install. Bill for storage if the customer cannot
come up with the money to get the job out of your shop.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2698 posts in 2041 days


#9 posted 04-20-2012 01:12 PM

Jerry, Your jig is the same principal as mine. Mine is the $1,500 type so it is faster since it it self centering and has pneumatic clamps, but their is little difference in what it does. I’ll try to get pictures soon.

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2698 posts in 2041 days


#10 posted 04-20-2012 04:54 PM

Jerry, Here are a few pictures of my jig and cutter. I know its overkill for you, but thought you might be interested. Unfortunately it costs a lot of money to be productive.

-- She thought I hung the moon--now she just thinks I did it wrong

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2253 posts in 2301 days


#11 posted 04-21-2012 02:47 PM

Thanks Kent for the pics. I am sure as we grow we will be able to add more pieces. I looked into the 1500.00 plus jigs but we just are not at that point financially speaking. Actually, we are getting ready to break ground soon on our 13 acres. We are going to start out by building a 60 X 40 metal shop with the future plan of adding on. Currently we lease which cost a fair amount so whenever we are able to build we will own, and hopefully save some expenses since we will not be paying a monthly lease payment. So after we build the shop, I hope to add more tools in the form of more shapers and I hope to add a CNC soon. Right now I guess it is all dreams. But the immediate need is getting these arched panel doors built, which I am sure will be fairly straight forward.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

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