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Forum topic by Craftsman on the lake posted 04-17-2012 08:49 PM 2820 views 0 times favorited 75 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Craftsman on the lake

2401 posts in 2135 days


04-17-2012 08:49 PM

Recently, someone mentioned that wouldn’t it be nice for the author to be able to end a thread. Well I guess you can’t but here’s a major alteration anyway….

The post that was here is now not here. Movin’ on.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.


75 replies so far

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2345 days


#1 posted 04-17-2012 09:01 PM

good call Daniel!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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ShipWreck

536 posts in 2450 days


#2 posted 04-17-2012 09:49 PM

Yep…... good call. No sense in having a passion turn around and bite you.

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wildbill001

99 posts in 1339 days


#3 posted 04-17-2012 10:15 PM

I would maintain there is nothing wrong at all about maintaining a healthy respect for the saw, with or without the blade-guard.

Also I feel that a cumbersome guard has the POTENTIAL to cause more harm than good. Don’t let the guard lull you into a false sense of security. You may just end up at the ER wonder how this could have happend—I was using the guard…..

Bill

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown

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Craftsman on the lake

2401 posts in 2135 days


#4 posted 04-17-2012 10:26 PM

I’ve always had respect for moving blades, table saw, router, jointer, etc. I can’t imagine anyone becoming complacent with a table saw. Because of the nature of the blade there are very few accidental cuts on table saws. the blade ‘hooks’ usually cause amputations or close to it. I never, never take a spinning blade for granted. 40,000 able saw accidents a year. Nearly right up there with the number of automobile deaths per year. Nothing to sneeze at for sure.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Tyrone D's profile

Tyrone D

314 posts in 1030 days


#5 posted 04-17-2012 10:32 PM

When I was doing my first year Joinery at the college, the saws had some old Beisemeyer overarm guards that actually caused more danger for me that without. I don’t know whether they were poorly setup or it was a flaw in the design. They were so wide you couldn’t safely rip 6” between the fence and blade. The guard got in the way of my hand holding the pushstick and it was very hard to keep the workpiece from pivoting into the blade. I do hope Beisemeyer improved their guard.

-- --Tyrone - BC, Canada "Nothing is ever perfect, we just run out of time."

View eddie's profile (online now)

eddie

7439 posts in 1311 days


#6 posted 04-17-2012 11:22 PM

i got a old jet i picked up at a pawn shop dont even have a splitter on it .looked all over for the original but this one was to old i guess ,but got one ordered from i think its shark guard hope to have it soon they make as you order.i done had a couple kick backs .the saw stop is my next major item to get ,i am fearful of tablesaws .i rodeoed for a long time in my younger years road saddle bronks but mostly bull rode table saw is like bull rideing its just a matter of time .

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

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Loren

7746 posts in 2345 days


#7 posted 04-18-2012 12:10 AM

I’m a blade guard user. My current saw is from Europe and
the arbor speed is faster than American saws – without the
guard it spits a lot of sawdust towards the operator making
rip cuts. The airborne particle factor is just one more
reason to use a guard.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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wildbill001

99 posts in 1339 days


#8 posted 04-18-2012 03:22 AM

Please don’t get me wrong. If you like and use the guard, that is totally good for me. And I certainly didn’t want to imply, Craftsman (love that, btw), that you are or were complacent. Just wanted to point out that just because there is a guard on a saw doesn’t make it safe. I’ve seen quite a few people do some really dangerous stuff with a table-saw with a guard thinking, “Ah, I’ll be okay.”

Right up there with, “Here, hold my beer” and “Hey ya’ll, watch this…”

Bill W

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown

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Craftsman on the lake

2401 posts in 2135 days


#9 posted 04-18-2012 09:18 AM

No offense taken Wildbill. I’ve gotten too close to the blade on occasion myself. The hood really isn’t that important I’d think compared to the riving knife and anti kickback teeth on this one. In fact, to make it easier for close cuts, I might remove the rivet that swivels the hood up and down and replace it with a removable pin. That way, when I need to I can just remove the hood but leave the knife. Once and awhile I make an enclosed cut were the blade doesn’t protrude from the wood. For that I’ll have to remove the entire thing.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5518 posts in 2072 days


#10 posted 04-18-2012 06:27 PM

You might be surprised how much more easily a piece of wood will glide past a good sharp thin kerf blade (a waxed table top is a plus too). That DW construction blade isn’t one of their better offerings.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Craftsman on the lake

2401 posts in 2135 days


#11 posted 04-18-2012 06:44 PM

I’ve got a freud thin kerf blade. I’d been cutting pine lately to make screen doors. I rarely use pine and hate the resins that deposit. I keep this older dewalt blade for ripping pine boards and other stuff that I don’t want my good blades in; plywood and such.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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sandhill

2128 posts in 2621 days


#12 posted 04-18-2012 06:47 PM

Daniel, I get the same way when I have to use my Delta cabinet saw but its only 5 years old. I had been thinking of getting and using a “power feeder” they are only a few hundred dollars compared to thousands for Saw Stop. Just in case you have not thought of that option.

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a1Jim

112367 posts in 2274 days


#13 posted 04-18-2012 06:59 PM

Hey Danial
I hate guards because their such a pain to remove, I may just pay the price some day if a tooth comes flying off and hits me between the eyes. I think your wise to take the precaution but I just can’t bring myself to do it. If only all guards came off as easily as Saw Stops.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View mcase's profile

mcase

438 posts in 1826 days


#14 posted 04-18-2012 07:20 PM

Dancing with the Devil? Why Demonize Sawstop? A really, really bright guy working in his garage figures out a practical and reliable system for saving people from table saw injuries. He then gets stonewalled by all the big manufacturers. So he designs the nicest North American style saw available and launches a manufacturing business from the ground up. The Industrial version was leagues better than anything available at the time and is equal to or better than the new Unisaw. Now his product is smoking the competition. Capitalism at its best. Ok, its that lawsuit OSHA stuff isn’t it? Yeah capitalism at its worst. But believe me its nothing Delta or Powermatic wouldn’t do if they had bought the technology instead of trying to suppress it. However, that does not have anything to do the saw. Notice that the owners all love it? Normally we only pay attention to criticism from owners. All this non-owner criticism is crazy. We don’t pay attention to non-owner criticism with other products. So keep it simple. Its a quality product with proven safety technology that surpasses anything else out there. Your waiting for the old one to die. I know that feeling, but its not just the safety. The upgrade will make you happy everyday. I replaced a later model PM 66 with an industrial SS five years ago and I’m still happy about it.

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Craftsman on the lake

2401 posts in 2135 days


#15 posted 04-18-2012 07:25 PM

Ah, Mcase…. I think you’ve misread. I’m a proponent of Sawstop. Wish I had one. I will have one someday. Dancing with the devil was about putting the blade guard back on after all these years. It’s the devil in that to gain some protection you’ve got to be inconvenienced by having it in the way.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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