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Holy Pythagorean Theorem , Batman !!

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Forum topic by Dusty56 posted 04-16-2012 05:30 PM 4671 views 2 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dusty56

11806 posts in 3148 days


04-16-2012 05:30 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource jig tip tool gauge

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2084361/38150/Woodpeckers-OneTime-Tool-40-Pythagoras-Gauge.aspx

Looks like something we could make for ourselves : )

Product Information:
Get 90 degree angles right (no pun intended) with an innovative tool based on an ancient equation!

a2 + b2 = c2. It’s been over 2500 years since Pythagoras wrote down that simple formula. Builders, carpenters and woodworkers still use the Pythagorean Theorem every day to make sure a “right” angle is truly 90 degrees. You can apply the “3-4-5” triangle rule, measuring the three sides of a triangle to see if you get the exact ratios that indicate a square corner. You can also measure the a, b & c sides of the triangle and test for square using the a2 + b2 = c2 equation. But Woodpeckers Pythagoras Gauges give you a much faster way to apply the Pythagorean Theorem without doing any measuring or math.

Woodpecker’s Pythagoras Gauges are easy and foolproof to use, and enable you to test for square with speed and accuracy that would make Pythagoras’ head spin. Our gauges test for square based on three points of contact. Set the point of the gauge’s short leg into the corner, and then see if the remaining two pointed ends touch the sides of the assembly. Three points of contact signify a right angle. If there’s just two points of contact, the third point’s distance from the edge will tell you exactly how much the angle is off. With our Pythagoras Gauges, you won’t need to fuss with your tape measure or calculator, or squint along the edges of a conventional square.

Woodpeckers Pythagoras Gauges are made in four sizes: 7”, 12”, 24” and 40”. This range of sizes will enable you to cover corners from small jewelry boxes right on up to large cabinets and even decks. These tools are simple but very accurate. Each part is machined from aircraft grade aluminum, anodized for smart appearance and durability, and assembled by hand.

Woodpeckers Pythagoras Gauges are made to order.

Deadline to place your order is Monday April 30th, 2012. Delivery is scheduled for end of July, 2012.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!


15 replies so far

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2128 posts in 3384 days


#1 posted 04-16-2012 05:44 PM

It has a pretty big price tag, I agree it could be made in ones shop. Steve at http://www.woodworkingformeremortals.com/2010/12/fibonacci-gauge.html has a video and plans for making a Fibonacci gauge which works great as well.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2608 posts in 2511 days


#2 posted 04-16-2012 08:06 PM

I still need to make myself a Fibonacci gauge, rather than always taking a measurement, then getting out the calculator to figure out the other dimension.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View jaykaypur's profile

jaykaypur

4006 posts in 1868 days


#3 posted 04-16-2012 08:42 PM

Well…...............maybe I’m a dumbass but doesn’t a tri-square/framing square do the same thing?

-- Use it up, Wear it out --------------- Make it do, Or do without!

View brtech's profile

brtech

893 posts in 2383 days


#4 posted 04-16-2012 09:14 PM

It does, but this gauge can let you figure out how far off you are.

It also is probably more accurate than most framing squares, and works inside a box, where typically only a smaller square or triangle would work.

View RandyM68's profile

RandyM68

693 posts in 1778 days


#5 posted 04-16-2012 09:22 PM

Jay, I hesitate to call you a dumb-ass, but try squres aren’t necessarily square to begin with. I’ve bought several that looked fine until I checked them against something else. I’m not going to pay sixty dollars for this stupid thing, either, but it helps to check things several different ways.

-- I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. I'm sorry,thanks.

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2528 days


#6 posted 04-16-2012 09:51 PM

Wasn’t there a recent thread about “gadgets”? This looks like one. I think I’ll stick to measuring diagonals. It’s worked just fine for plenty of years. – lol

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View jack1's profile

jack1

2057 posts in 3487 days


#7 posted 04-16-2012 11:13 PM

measure diagonals. it’s cheaper and works…

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View Martyroc's profile

Martyroc

2712 posts in 1766 days


#8 posted 04-16-2012 11:34 PM

Easily! I will stick with measuring the diagonals. Maybe I will build one, and to justify the price tag I will go into my workshop after 2 (6) packs, that should make it challenging :)

-- Martin ....always count the number of fingers you have before, and after using the saw.

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2880 posts in 2987 days


#9 posted 04-17-2012 12:47 AM

I think that the person who wrote the description of this product is the same person who writes the descriptions of the Lee Valley April Fool’s Day offerings (here).

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

780 posts in 1962 days


#10 posted 04-17-2012 07:40 AM

This isn’t actually Pythagorus, it is geometry of circles (Theorem: an angle inscribed in a semi-circle is always a right angle).

The trick is that the pivot bolt is exactly in the centre of the straight piece, and the length of the short arm (from tip of point to centre of the pivot bolt) is exactly half the length of the long arm (tip of point to tip of point). So, yes, dead simple to make and very accurate and easy to use too.

ChuckV, the product is not necessarily a joke, but the price sure is!

Edit: I read the description again. ”Each part is machined from aircraft grade aluminum, anodized for smart appearance and durability, and assembled by hand”. Hence the price. Still a joke.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

View Loren's profile

Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#11 posted 04-17-2012 08:12 AM

If it’s made by Woodpeckers you might not need it.

Jes’ sayin’ ya know.

View Jim Rowe's profile

Jim Rowe

922 posts in 1772 days


#12 posted 04-17-2012 08:56 AM

I made one yesterday for less than £1 ($1.50). Nice little exercise in accurate measuring and drilling. Don’t forget though, it only tells you that your right angle is a wrong angle. It doesn’t make right angles, right!
Jim

-- It always looks better when it's finished!

View Roger's profile

Roger

19865 posts in 2264 days


#13 posted 04-17-2012 12:51 PM

This is the sorts of things that I always talk about being so expensive. There is no way that this tool should cost what they are asking for it. I’ll make one before I ever purchase one. If I woulda been born rich instead o so damn good lookin!! HA !!

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3148 days


#14 posted 04-18-2012 12:57 AM

Loren , “If it’s made by Woodpeckers you might not need it.” So true !! LOL

Roger , “If I woulda been born rich instead o so damn good lookin!!”
My Grandpa used to add to that saying ” But it’s hell to be cheated out of both” !! : )
Thanks for the flashback : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Roger's profile

Roger

19865 posts in 2264 days


#15 posted 04-18-2012 01:19 PM

:) @Dusty…. I know that feelin hahahaha

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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