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Forum topic by Sirgreggins posted 04-12-2012 07:01 PM 1812 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1697 days


04-12-2012 07:01 PM

I’m thinking of building a coffee table for my apt soon. Solid cherry, with a rock maple/bolivian rosewood checkerboard inlayed into the top. I want to have some kind of UV protection to slow the wood color change as long as possible. I want to use General Finishes: Seal A Cell and then a topcoat of Arm R Seal. Can the General Finishes EF High Performance products be used between those two? If not, what would you recommend for the UV protection to slow that color change with those two other finishes? One last thing If the EF can be used over Seal A Cell, is it worth using the Arm R Seal as well? Sorry for all the questions and thanks guys. Happy woodworking.


16 replies so far

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killerb

150 posts in 1860 days


#1 posted 04-12-2012 10:57 PM

You should not use the high performance between them. It will cause issues. Are you going to use clear seal a cell? Not a color? If you use a stain and then wipe on the top coat, it may pull the color. Can you keep the table out of the sun? Sorry for the questions, but it will help me give you the right answer. I can have UV inhibitors added to my finishes , but I do this for a living and I don’t think you can have this done. One thing to remember, they only last for 6 months tops. So keeping the table out of the sun is the best idea. Hope this helps. bob

-- Bob www.bobkloes.com

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Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1697 days


#2 posted 04-13-2012 01:37 AM

This will be a living room piece so it won’t have very much sunlight other than whatever comes through the windows. It will be a clear finish to show the natural colors of the woods. So judging from your response seal a cell then the arm r seal and thats it. I guess with so little direct light (maybe a hour a day at most) those seem like the best option. I will use some dewaxed shellac first just to add some more protection plus i like the look and its easy to level making the other coats go on even nicer. But what do you think. Thanks Bob

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TopamaxSurvivor

17664 posts in 3138 days


#3 posted 04-13-2012 04:04 AM

Try this site http://www.penofin.com/faqs.shtml I’m no expert, but that us what I found for UV protection.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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killerb

150 posts in 1860 days


#4 posted 04-13-2012 11:01 AM

Skip the shellac. Just an extra coat of arm r seal. That is a better finish then shellac. Will build up to be harder. If there is a way to keep it out of direct sunlight, that is best. But it will turn over time. Sounds like a nice piece. Good luck and be sure the top can move inside the frame. You would not want it to crack. bob

-- Bob www.bobkloes.com

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Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1697 days


#5 posted 04-13-2012 12:59 PM

Thanks. I’ll skip the shellac then how much clearance should i have for the inlayed checkerboard? I obviously don’t want gaps but i’m not sure how to allow for seasonal expansion/contraction. This is one aspect of wood working I’m still really diving into to learn.

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killerb

150 posts in 1860 days


#6 posted 04-14-2012 11:29 AM

The first thing in woodworking is wood always moves. If you want to inlay a veneer checkerboard into a solid top, that is one thing. If you want to inlay a solid wood one into a solid top, you will have issues. If you can isolate the checkerboard from the rest of the top, so that everything cam move independently, then you might be ok. Without seeing or knowing what you are doing , its hard for me to answer the right way. Sorry for the crappy answer. I just don’t know what you are doing completely. If you might post a picture, I can try and help more. bob

-- Bob www.bobkloes.com

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2312 days


#7 posted 04-14-2012 02:22 PM

Every vintage checkerboard that I have seen had issues. Not that I’ve seen a bajillion, or even a score. But it seems like lining up variables and letting them work on each other.

Would you consider a checkerboard that stowed under the table? Maybe do a square the same size in each corner, so it’s clearly a set?

Just lobbing a few ideas over the ol’ net.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1697 days


#8 posted 04-14-2012 08:12 PM

i think i’m going to over cut an do a border and leave some empty space under that. I’ve seen quite a few tables with the inlaid wood but i’m not sure how they took that stuff into account. I really want it to be on the top. I like you squares on the corner idea. That’d be cool. Thanks for the suggestions. This is a lot to think about.

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Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1697 days


#9 posted 04-14-2012 09:29 PM

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Lee Barker

2170 posts in 2312 days


#10 posted 04-15-2012 01:27 AM

Brain on turbo….

Is this chess or checkers? If it’s chess, how about turned legs based on an inverted bishop?

Well, I’m glad I got that thought out. Now there’s room in there for something unweird.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

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killerb

150 posts in 1860 days


#11 posted 04-16-2012 12:22 AM

If you look at the picture you posted, the top is veneered inside a frame. I would bet the top is a plywood or mdf interior with veneer on both sides. Then wrapped in a solid wood frame. Nice looking drop leaf table. It is a nice design. bob

-- Bob www.bobkloes.com

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Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1697 days


#12 posted 04-16-2012 12:39 AM

Would the gap idea be feasible? (this will keep it separated by 1/16 or or more gap between the edge of the pocket and the checkboard) Or what about putting a frame around the checkboard with some brad nails? Maybe this is a lost cause I just like the idea. I never thought that the seasonal movement would be such a big deal, but I’m new to wood working i’d rather learn this now than to do it and find out later. thanks again for all the info guys.

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killerb

150 posts in 1860 days


#13 posted 04-16-2012 12:51 PM

I would say no. I am a firm believer in building the table to allow movement. You can buy the veneer checkerboard all made up and the mdf or ply panel stock is no big deal. Just balance the veneer both top and bottom as you build the center panel. Add your wood frame around it and the drop leaves. The big thing with veneer is to build balance in your panel. Lots of good information on laying up a veneered panel on the net. Just don’t use contact cement. Monster Woodshop is a great source. bob

-- Bob www.bobkloes.com

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Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1697 days


#14 posted 04-20-2012 08:03 PM

With all of this great feed back i’m going to abandon this idea and just use inlay banding. It’ll be easier and will still look nice. spalted maple and walnut. I’ll save the chess board for my end grain cutting board

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MNgary

295 posts in 1879 days


#15 posted 04-24-2012 12:26 PM

I am not a commercial woodworker so I know others have more exact data to use in addition to a lot more experience than I. That said, the charts I use when planning my projects indicate cherry, when stabilized in a room at 50% relative humidity versus a room at 25% r.h., will be 6/100 of an inch wider for each 12” in width. Sugar maple would move 8/100 of an inch.

In looking at the picture you uploaded, I think the dark squares are the same species as the rest of the piece so they would move consistent with the rest of the top. However, the light colored squares are turned so their grain direction is lateral to the table top. In addition, they may be either sapwood from the same species or an entirely different species – either could be a problem in addition to grain direction.

I ponder whether all the squares could be cherry in your project, be laid in with the same grain direction, BUT chosen for coloration and then dyed significantly different colors before you assemble the inset. A lighter cherry adjacent ebonized cherry could be very impressive. Just a thought before you abandon your original vision.

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

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