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Multiple piece glue up, or solid piece for a chair

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Forum topic by Zignot5 posted 04-11-2012 07:29 PM 919 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Zignot5

9 posts in 1767 days


04-11-2012 07:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question glue-up

Hi,
I’m planning on building a chair out of cherry. The plans I have call for some of the pieces being 8/4 to start. I’m wondering if I can glue up some of my thinner boards to make an 8/4 slab, or if i need to get some thicker lumber.
I’m concerned with losing strength & I’m not sure what problems it would cause throughout the process. The glue lines might also look terrible.
Have any of you tried this? Or do you have any cautions against this approach?

Thanks
Adam


6 replies so far

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Loren

8309 posts in 3112 days


#1 posted 04-11-2012 07:53 PM

Depends on the part.

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Zignot5

9 posts in 1767 days


#2 posted 04-11-2012 07:58 PM

It would be seat & legs

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Loren

8309 posts in 3112 days


#3 posted 04-11-2012 08:09 PM

Be more specific. Structurally laminating parts is not a problem –
it is commonly done in factory chairs where 6/4 stock is edge glued
in wide panels and curved chain legs are cut from the panel. Finger
jointing is sometimes used but it’s usually on lower-end chairs
when you see it.

The problems are going to be with the appearance of the
work. Lamination can be used for a design effect though.

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Zignot5

9 posts in 1767 days


#4 posted 04-11-2012 11:58 PM

Thanks.
I have access to lots of 1/2” milled boards & 1” rough stock. I was just looking for a way to avoid having to locate 2” thick stock. I’m afraid that I’ll regret the short cut of gluing due to the glue lines.
I appreciate the advice

View Lumber2Sawdust's profile

Lumber2Sawdust

139 posts in 2330 days


#5 posted 04-12-2012 04:21 AM

I think more importantly than the glue lines, if you are shaping the seat and dishing it out for the sitting area, what you may run into is that the grain is going to be very different between the 2 laminated boards. That might make it look odd.

Depending on your tastes, that might be a good thing though.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#6 posted 04-12-2012 04:30 AM

By having multiple pieces glued together you minimize the wood movement across the seat it’s a standard practice for many chair makers.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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