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Forum topic by Joe Lyddon posted 04-05-2012 05:42 PM 817 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joe Lyddon

7952 posts in 2807 days


04-05-2012 05:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cnc kono auction for sale expensive ended

Very close to ending…
OK, you CNC guru's, here's your chance to Step UP!

Edit:
OOPS… it just ended a few minutes ago…

... BUT, it will give you an idea of what you missed! LOL

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"


8 replies so far

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1175 days


#1 posted 04-06-2012 03:26 PM

That’s a very nice machine. Sold new at around $150k.

I cut my teeth in CNC on an Innova 408 very much like this one.
Someone got a deal on it.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1281 posts in 2492 days


#2 posted 04-06-2012 03:47 PM

I was going to bid on it but it is a 400 volt system. It started at $1,000 with reserve met.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1175 days


#3 posted 04-06-2012 05:16 PM

The power system configures to most all 3 phase setups. I think we ran ours on 208V 3Ph. The real issue with this unit is the missing vacuum system. That one runs about $25k just for that.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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DS

2132 posts in 1175 days


#4 posted 04-06-2012 05:19 PM

The Fanuc controller by itself costs more than the sell price.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

4497 posts in 1083 days


#5 posted 04-06-2012 06:41 PM

Their are smokin’ deals on used CNC’s these days…

We desperately needed to upgrade our 15 year old auction orphan and I found a very lightly used, two year old CNT-900 series with 15 HP vac. table, 10 HP Italian spindle, an 8 position tool changer, software and a boat load of tooling for $19K.

There are so many different styles of machines out there, and many are specialized for cabinent making… it was a mind boggling search.

You got to have 3 phase…

and you have to budget in freight…. and may need to pay some one to set it up, tune it in and train you up on it.

We sent one of our drivers on an over night trip to get the machine and paid a manufacturer’s rep about $3K to help us get up and running properly.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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DS

2132 posts in 1175 days


#6 posted 04-06-2012 06:44 PM

A machine that big needs a rigger to deliver and place it in your shop. A footer in the foundation is a good idea too since it weighs about 11,000 lbs.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View dannelson's profile

dannelson

153 posts in 1126 days


#7 posted 04-06-2012 09:59 PM

dont believe everything you read . Id stay far away from a fixed ganty machine all together. you dont need 3 phase or a rigger, 11000 lbs why bother? there are plenty of used machines out there . Im talking solid entry level machines with software that doesnt take years of practice to run. granted you will not be cutting at 600 in per min like the big iron machines but the will get the job done faster and more accurate than what your doing now . check out shopbot, cam master ,luguna, omni , techno .and a host of others. dont get trapped into thinking that they are just for panel processing . the cnc revolution has started dont miss the boat.

-- nelson woodcrafters

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1175 days


#8 posted 04-06-2012 11:15 PM

Fixed Gantry machines take twice the floor space, but have several advantages over a moving gantry.

That said, nearly all of those advantages are irrelevant for woodworking. The fixed gantry machines evolved from the metal working industry and have a very tight tolereance standard by comparison. The Mach I Innova 510 is a workhorse and can process a lot of wood in a continuous cycle. I’ve made lots of money on a machine like that.

A moving gantry makes more sense to most woodworkers due to cost/floor space savings. Not many of those have nice Fanuc controllers though. Onsrud has a kind of “home brew” controller that gives me fits at times.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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