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Forum topic by Mainiac Matt posted 04-04-2012 05:28 PM 1271 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mainiac Matt

5999 posts in 1795 days


04-04-2012 05:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: biscuit panel glue

When using biscuits to help align and strengthen glued up solid wood panels….

Do you….

1. apply glue to the biscuits
2. squirt glue into the slot
3. insert dry biscuits into dry slots

I know they can swell and subsequently shrink, leaving dimpels if you sand inbetween.

On my ongoing blanket chest project, I brushed a thin coat of TB III on the biscuits and then had to tap them into the slots with a mallet. The panel is made up of very dry 3/4” red oak. Do you think a need to be concerned with this?

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!


12 replies so far

View Milo's profile

Milo

869 posts in 2786 days


#1 posted 04-04-2012 05:35 PM

My understanding is you need the water from the glue to swell the bisquit to make a STRONG hold for your straight-line glueup, so you need to put glue in the slot AND on the bisquit. That’s how I always do it.

Where did you get your blanket chest plans?

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#2 posted 04-04-2012 05:46 PM

I echo what Milo said.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View molarman's profile

molarman

44 posts in 3284 days


#3 posted 04-04-2012 05:52 PM

This does not necessarily answer your question as asked, but is meant more as an FYI.

While biscuits will aid in the alignment of your panels, they will provide no additional strength. As you are gluing long grain to long grain, there is no need to supplement the glued surface.

-- Woodworking is not a destination....it's a joinery !!! http://smilesrus.com/pages/woodgallery.html

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5182 posts in 2661 days


#4 posted 04-04-2012 06:16 PM

I quit using biscuits a long time ago…..as molorman said, they don’t provide any additional strength…..In fact, I had more trouble with some allignments using them, especially If I had a little bow in the board….I glue long grain to long grain using glue only, and pull them in tight and flat….. I think you have answered your own question…...But…as you described, that’s how I did it, too…..

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2142 days


#5 posted 04-05-2012 02:35 AM

When I use biscuits I always glue them. I don’t always glue biscuits. Depends on what I am doing and how much help I need.

View woodluc's profile

woodluc

11 posts in 1796 days


#6 posted 04-05-2012 03:26 AM

I glue them, but probalby out of habit more then anything,
I dont think glue-ing would help much in any structural facet.

-- http://timberfurnitureplans.com/

View dnick's profile

dnick

984 posts in 1849 days


#7 posted 04-05-2012 03:50 AM

I agree that biscuits are more for ease of alignment, but I think they strengthen my miter joints. I put a small amount of glue on the sides of the slots, & a small amount on the end of the biscuit. The more glue you use the more those suckers are going to move(twist ) & screw up your assembly

-- dnick, North Hollywood, Ca.

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BlankMan

1488 posts in 2819 days


#8 posted 04-05-2012 01:41 PM

I use biscuits on occasion basically for alignment when gluing up long boards and put glue in the slot and on the biscuit. Also sometimes when building a box for a cabinet or in miter joints of a frame, again for ease of alignment when gluing them up.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1836 days


#9 posted 04-05-2012 02:08 PM

I use biscuits for aligning boards for glue-ups into large panels, along with several cauls. When I use the biscuits, I lay the boards on edge, run my bead of glue down the board, including the slots, and drop the biscuits in. When I use my brush to spread the glue, any excess gets smeared onto the closest biscuit. On the opposing board, I will put glue into the slots only.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Milo's profile

Milo

869 posts in 2786 days


#10 posted 04-05-2012 02:37 PM

FYI, back when I was doing furniture repair, I had an insurance moving claim to do. Turned out the guy was a woodworker, did a lot of counterbalance pieces. I was there just to do a repair estimate.

But the weird (scary) piece was this HUGE, VERY heavy dining room table he’d made out of some exotic wood. I mean like 8’ by 3 ’. Maybe 10’. Weighed a ton, and in the move, all fourlegs had broken off at the table joint. Upon examination I founf out why.

Instead of using mortise and tenon joints to attach the legs to the table, he had used biscuits.

I was asked by the insurance company if I’d do repairs. I told them no way.

scary.

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2947 days


#11 posted 04-05-2012 02:39 PM

I do it much like BinghamtonEd said. I will often run a bead of glue on the entire edge of the opposite board also then spread it out with a small brush.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1836 days


#12 posted 04-05-2012 02:47 PM

“Instead of using mortise and tenon joints to attach the legs to the table, he had used biscuits.”

Yeah, biscuits have their purposes. That definitely is not one of them!

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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