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Joint failure on high chair tray

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Forum topic by fredf posted 743 days ago 606 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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fredf

495 posts in 2209 days


743 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question gluing failed joint regluing

I am trying to refinish a high chair between two grand sons. The first has out grown it, and the next needs it soon! I stripped it and have been meaning to finish it but haven’t gotten a round tuit.

I went down tonight with the intentions of sealing with a coat of shellac, but discovered that about half of one of the joints has failed. what is the best way to finish the break so it can be reglued? I tried flexing it hoping that would do it. but the second half seems to be sound. Should I open the end and slip in a wedge? Perhaps sprits a bit of water to weaken the glue? Try to snap on the edge of the bench? I am hoping to get a clean break so it can be simply reglued.

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma


8 replies so far

View oluf's profile

oluf

254 posts in 1538 days


#1 posted 743 days ago

I would saw it in two through the glue joint and than re-glue it, Unless it is hide glue, glue wil not hold when applied to dry glue.so you need to have the joint apart to clean it and the saw will clean off the old glue as it cuts through the joint.

-- Nils, So. Central MI. Wood is honest.Take the effort to understand what it has to tell you before you try to change it.

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fredf

495 posts in 2209 days


#2 posted 743 days ago

Oluf I had thought of that but think that the shape of the tray and the interior of the tray would show the missing material. if I could get a clean split and scrape I think I’d be better off

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 1980 days


#3 posted 743 days ago

If the joint isnt too gummed up with glue, I usually take Titebond and squeeze some out along the split, then I take a sharp utility knife or razor knife and run it along the joint a few times to force the glue down in the crack. Then clamp it.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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fredf

495 posts in 2209 days


#4 posted 743 days ago

SnowyRiver That too is an option. I bet unwaxed dental floss would be good for applying too. I have some syringes that I think would be small enough to get glue in there, especially if I wedged open the crack a bit I was worried that I wouldn’t be able to do all the crack that way (as it would taper to 0 where the glue is currently holding)

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

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a1Jim

109230 posts in 2076 days


#5 posted 743 days ago

hard to tell with out seeing it but you might blow it out with air ,use some naptha and a tooth brush and clean the crack out . and after it’s dry ,take some titebond III and pour it in the crack and at the same time hold the hose of your shop vac below the crack once you can tell you have pulled glue all the way through the crack place a piece of tape on the bottom and clamp and let partially dry until the glue has gelled ,before it’s totally dry while leaving clamps in place then remove tape and clean up the excess glue on both sides and let dry.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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fredf

495 posts in 2209 days


#6 posted 743 days ago

a1Jim Now that is an excellent Idea. thinking out of the box for sure thanks!

-- Fred, Springfield, Ma

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a1Jim

109230 posts in 2076 days


#7 posted 743 days ago

Good luck with that Fred.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View derosa's profile

derosa

1470 posts in 1335 days


#8 posted 743 days ago

In line with the cutting idea, cut that spot and a spot mirror opposite it. This way you can glue in a couple slats of contrasting or slightly darker/lighter wood. That would make the fix look like an intentional accent. Just before you glue them in trace the outline of the cuts onto the slats, slice close to the line on the bandsaw and once glued clean up the new pieces with some files and sandpaper. The help everything glue up proper take a flat board, cut some wider dadoes in where the slats will be, glue a lip to the top of it also with matching dadoes. This will let you glue it up so that the tray will go back together straight without interference from the slightly oversized slats.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

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