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Forum topic by Charlie posted 03-31-2012 12:32 PM 904 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie

1064 posts in 1009 days


03-31-2012 12:32 PM

I have a project coming up where I’ll be building a whole kitchen’s worth of cabinets (as soon as my wife makes a couple of style/finish decisions). I bought a new table saw because my old one was just a home owner saw and really couldn’t do this. I have a nice sliding miter saw tucked into a corner of my shop.

For some of the mockups I’ve been doing, I used my crosscut sled to make stiles and rails, but I’m really thinking I should be using the miter saw. Get it set up for a run of X-length pieces and go. Seems a more appropriate tool for cutting lots of sticks to a specified length than the table saw..

Table saw for panels, dados, ripping frame stock to size, etc.
And then the miter saw for cutting sticks for frames and doors.

It dawned on me that in my excitement about getting the new table saw, maybe I was trying to make it do everything when I already had something that could do some of these operations better.

Did I just have a duh moment? Am I thinking this correctly? I have so many things going on here (shop and non-shop) I just want to be sure I don’t run off into the weeds somewhere.

Thanks


12 replies so far

View Chipy's profile

Chipy

374 posts in 1317 days


#1 posted 03-31-2012 12:55 PM

I am assuming you are talking about raised panel doors? If you are I like to let the style run long, then once the door is glued and squared up I rout off the remaining stock with profile bit that I used for the out side of the door.This way you don’t have to worry about coming up short on the length of your style.I have a cross cut sled but I like to use my miter saw a lot so I cut my door stock with my Dewalt chop saw, its plenty accurate.I have the MLCS door calculating program for my computer and it works great it takes the guess work and head scratching out of door lay out and it will also do wains coating.Hope I am not insulting you woodworking skills just trying to pass on some knowledge.

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1918 days


#2 posted 03-31-2012 01:11 PM

Charlie;

Both will work.

If your MS has a good cross cut blade and blade is dead square to fence should work well. Do you have a good length stop on your miter saw?

You can easily add a stop to your sled also. It as easy as a clamp and a square block of MDF?

Good luck with your cabinets.

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

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Charlie

1064 posts in 1009 days


#3 posted 03-31-2012 01:14 PM

Not insulting at all. The doors are simple shaker style. Very simple. Wife wants this to look like a cottage kitchen (not country….. cottage) so simple, functional, but with an edgey attitude as we’ll be adding some elements that are decidedly contemporary.

The cabinets themselves, though, are simple. No routered edges, no raised panels. And that’s by choice (hers) hehehe. Face frames will be 3/4” soft maple and will be painted, as will the doors. I just think pine or poplar would get dinged up a little too easily and I can get the maple at a reasonable price.

Anyways…. back on topic :) Sliding miter for repeat cuts on sticks. Table saw for panel, dado, ripping…. good?

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Chipy

374 posts in 1317 days


#4 posted 03-31-2012 02:47 PM

Charlie I am sure you know but your wife made your life easy with shaker style all operations needed to achieve shaker style can be accomplished on the table saw.What type of hinge will you use? If you go with EURO style hinge such as BLUM or Salice watch your door sizes and your hing off set to make a proper fit and space between you doors.Both hinge makers have resources to determine the right hinge for the style cabinet you building I.E. Euro or face frame. I have built cabinets for years in a couple of different shops so I have been through a few pitfalls so if you have any questions Lumber Jocks is the place to get your answers!

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1792 days


#5 posted 03-31-2012 02:56 PM

I rip my rails & stile stock on the TS, then set up a stop to cut the lengths on the SCMS. I have several cutters for rail and stile profiles – including Shaker. After I have the rails & stiles cut, they go thru the shaper for my profile.

If you use a profile cutter, make sure that it’s sized correctly for your panel thickness. Panels can have edges 1/4” or 5.2mm. If you mix them up, your panels either won’t fit – or they’ll be too loose.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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Charlie

1064 posts in 1009 days


#6 posted 03-31-2012 03:30 PM

Chipy: I’m looking at the Blum euro style with soft close built-in (screw in, not press in). Face frame mount (wrap around). Doors are 1/2” overlay. I have the info from Blum and double check before purchasing … it’s like 32 hinges to be installed and I think it might be worth buying their jig just to simplify things. I’m going to use the Blum undermount drawer slides on a few of the cabinets and will be getting their jig for drilling the drawers. The jigs aren’t cheap, but I think they save a lot of time and frustration.

Sawkerf: I don’t have a shaper. :) I’m actually using 1/2” panels. Edge rabbet on the back side to leave a 1/4” tongue all around. I’ll probably run the stiles and rails through the table saw with a 1/4” dado setup. So on the INSIDE of the door, the panel is about flush with the stiles/rails, but on the outside, the panel is 1/4” inset.. I’ve done doors that way a lot and they work great. My only concern here would be the weight. I’ve never thought of them as overly heavy when using a 1/2” panel instead of 1/4”, AND I’ve checked them against the Blum hinges I plan to use and I’m still well within weight limits … in fact I may only activate the soft-close on one hinge in a pair as the doors won’t be heavy enough to require both to be activated. I’m using 1/2” for the carcass backs and since I’m not a production shop, the difference between 1/2 and 1/4 is not worthy of consideration for me. :)

(carcasses are 3/4” 9-ply birch. Backs are 1/2” birch. Cabinet face frames, 3/4” maple. Doors shaker style 3/4” frames with 1/2” plywood panels. Finish will be paint/glaze/satin clearcoat)

I know some of the stuff I’m doing probably isn’t how a production shop would do it, but it’s just me and it’s my kitchen…. errr…. my wife’s kitchen…

I have a couple of odd cabinets to build. One is 18” deep and will house a microwave and toaster oven, will have a pullout so you can set things down, stir, and put back in or whatever.
The other odd cabinet is for a 36” wide, 10” deep stainless steel apron front farmhouse sink. That one will be a first for me but I spoke to the sink manufacturer and they were extremely helpful.

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Chipy

374 posts in 1317 days


#7 posted 03-31-2012 08:44 PM

Charlie It sounds like you are well versed in cabinet building there is not much that I can tell you that you don’t know already! I think you plan is more than sound, looking forward to some pictures Chipy

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Charlie

1064 posts in 1009 days


#8 posted 03-31-2012 10:03 PM

Chipy,
I have every confidence that I have a LOT TO LEARN! heheheheh…. And I appreciate any and all advice.

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1792 days


#9 posted 03-31-2012 10:26 PM

Charley -
That’s how I do 1/2” panels, too.

What’s the width of your door stiles? For most euro hinges, you’ll want at least 1-3/4” so the cup doesn’t interfere with the panel.

Be careful with that farmhouse sink. I did one a few years ago that was hand formed. It wasn’t perfectly uniform and I had a helluva time getting the front of the cabinet just right.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Marlow's profile

Marlow

81 posts in 1394 days


#10 posted 04-01-2012 12:07 AM

You might want to try something like this:

I initially considered using the miter saw for precision cross-cuts, as I believe you are proposing. I found that I got much better results using a precision miter gauge with an extension fence an flip stop. It allows repeatable results, i.e., you can cut identical rails/stiles all day long, with absolutely square clean cross-cuts. I use my miter saw these days mostly for cutting parts to rough size.

View Martyroc's profile

Martyroc

2708 posts in 1029 days


#11 posted 04-01-2012 12:22 AM

I used my miter saw for all the length cuts. I cut everything a little big , (around a 32nd) then shaved anything on the TS to finish it up. I did 32 doors in total and that worked for everyone.

-- Martin ....always count the number of fingers you have before, and after using the saw.

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1064 posts in 1009 days


#12 posted 04-01-2012 10:40 AM

Sawkerf,
Right now the stiles are planned at 2 inches. I’m going to mock up a couple doors for the wife and will do one at 2-1/2” stiles and one with 2 inch. The doors are almost 16” wide so 2-1/2 shouldn’t look to “heavy” but it’s her kitchen so I’ll let her make the choice. :)

Marlow,
I’ll take a look at that. Thanks

Martroc,
That’s kinda the process I was planning.

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