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Forum topic by Boudreaux posted 03-30-2012 11:28 PM 2463 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Boudreaux

24 posts in 1720 days


03-30-2012 11:28 PM

I have a Ryobi BT3000 with the original blade (36 tpi combination). Although the unit is 12 years old, the blade should still be very sharp. The saw has been used perhaps five times, for very short periods.

I have a 600 sqf engineered flooring project in the very near future, and will need to rip about 90 feet of engineered flooring to complete the project.

What blade configuration (by way of teeth), is best suited for ripping engineered flooring..??

-- Wilson Boudreaux


16 replies so far

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2535 days


#1 posted 03-30-2012 11:33 PM

If it’s carbide tipped, your blade should work just fine.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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Boudreaux

24 posts in 1720 days


#2 posted 03-30-2012 11:37 PM

Yes it is.

I have a Diablo 80 TPI (carbide, new). Would that give me a finer cut….???

-- Wilson Boudreaux

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ShaneA

6476 posts in 2065 days


#3 posted 03-30-2012 11:46 PM

80 tooth would be more for crosscuts. Your 36 tooth blade, if still sharp should be ok.

View jmos's profile

jmos

737 posts in 1836 days


#4 posted 03-30-2012 11:48 PM

Are you ripping or crosscutting? My understanding is that you don’t want to many teeth for ripping; most ripping blades have 24 to 30 teeth, and crosscutting blades are generally high tooth counts (60 to 80), with combo blades in the middle (40 to 50).

If your ripping I would stick with the 36 tooth. The 80 tooth is likely to bog down trying to clear the chips and cause a poor cut and a lot of burning.

-- John

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thebicyclecafe

23 posts in 1716 days


#5 posted 03-30-2012 11:50 PM

Shouldn’t matter since it’s flooring. If the teeth are still sharp on your 36t, you should get a good enough cut. Key here is, you’re not gluing the edges and they’ll even be hidden under moulding, so it’s not crucial to get chipout free cuts. You leave an expansion gap with flooring anyhow, so it’s all really forgiving. Since you’re using a table saw, it’s going to be difficult for you not to get the correct width. The more crucial thing is, just make sure you use the right safety equipment here- featherboards, blade guard, riving knife, push stick.

Now, if you think you are going to be doing more stuff around the house, or woodworking, you would probably eventually get a ripping blade. There’s no reason to spend more $$ if you’re just doing a few rooms and never going to have any use for it.
For lots of ripping, you really don’t want to bog the saw down and cut too slow, so I would personally opt for a low tooth count (24-30t) thin kerf carbide blade with a flat tooth grind.

Regarding your comment on the 80t blade, strictly speaking, since the engineered flooring is plywood and layered up with alternating grain orientations, you’re always cross cuttting the grain and theoretically the higher tooth count blade, presumably ATB will give you the best finish. But, no need here since all your cut edges are going to be hidden. Plus, it’ll cut too slow.

Ultimately when you are concerned about the quality of the cut you’re dealing more with the orientation of grain, rather than which direction you are cutting with respect to the dimensions of the workpiece.

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Boudreaux

24 posts in 1720 days


#6 posted 03-31-2012 01:09 AM

Hi Jmos.
I will be ripping on the table saw, and crosscutting on the miter saw.

Hi TBC,

Regarding your comment on the 80t blade, strictly speaking, since the engineered flooring is plywood and layered up with alternating grain orientations, you’re always cross cuttting the grain and theoretically the higher tooth count blade, presumably ATB will give you the best finish.

I’ve been doing a lot of research and came up with the above statement from several sources besides you. For that reason I thought the Freud D1080X Diablo 10-Inch 80-tooth ATB Finish Saw Blade might serve me very well. As mentioned by many on several other sites, “most or all cuts will be hidden by quarter round” so I suppose it doesn’t really matter what the cut looks like. It’s just that I will know, and personal satisfaction goes a long way…right…..???

Thanks to all for the info…...

-- Wilson Boudreaux

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#7 posted 03-31-2012 03:50 AM

Engineered flooring can be extremely tough on blades. A triple chip grind (TCG) will have the best edge life, and good examples of that grind are ideal for tough materials like flooring. It’s true that the 80T Diablo D1080X will leave a cleaner finish than the stock BT3000 36T FTG blade, but because the tips of an ATB grind are more prone to wear, if used floor tough flooring it’s likely that you’ll need to resharpen the D1080 before it’ll be suitable for fine woodworking cuts again. The 36T blade has a flat top grind (FTG) that will wear a little better than the ATB grind on your Diablo blade. I think I’d clean the 36T and give it a try first. If the cut isn’t clean enough, switch to the 80T, or buy a suitable TCG blade like this German made Onsrud 60T TCG for $21 shipped….you could end up using it on both your BT for rips and your miter saw for x-cuts.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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thebicyclecafe

4 posts in 1716 days


#8 posted 03-31-2012 06:47 AM

Boudreaux, sure personal satisfaction goes a long way, so in the end it’s all up to you. But I can tell you, assuming everything on your saw is aligned correctly, the difference will be minimal. You just might get a slight bit of rough edges or splintering with the lower tooth count blade. Why don’t you just take a piece of the flooring and rip one with the 36t, and rip one with the 80t? See which you really prefer. No sense in dulling that 80t blade quickly if you can just keep it for finishing cross cuts exclusively.
My experience with my Freud 24t FTG ripping blade is that I wouldn’t hesitate to use it for occasionally cutting ply or full time for ripping flooring- the finish is surprisingly smooth, cut is fast and you can feed the stock evenly through the blade.

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Boudreaux

24 posts in 1720 days


#9 posted 03-31-2012 07:07 AM

Thank you everyone….. I think I’ll start off ripping with the 36t and see how that works. It may allow me to save the Diablo 80t for finer things…. The 36 is an older blade although barley used, and probably not nearly as expensive as the Diablo 80T. AND, as was pointed out, all the cuts will be hidden any way.

Thank to all for the info…....!!!!

-- Wilson Boudreaux

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jmos

737 posts in 1836 days


#10 posted 03-31-2012 01:41 PM

mmmmm barley :-)

-- John

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Boudreaux

24 posts in 1720 days


#11 posted 03-31-2012 02:28 PM

OH OH ….... Barely used…... :)

-- Wilson Boudreaux

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John

341 posts in 3265 days


#12 posted 03-31-2012 03:21 PM

I just (feb) replaced the original blade on my bt3100

I think the bt3000 came with a European made blade (Amana?) that is supposed to be really nice. for the bt3100 they went to China

cmt orange ripping blade was on clearance at lowes… made in Italy not china!

hot knife + butter

-- John - Central PA - http://affyx.wordpress.com

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jmos

737 posts in 1836 days


#13 posted 03-31-2012 03:38 PM

Wilson, just making a silly beer joke, I see barley, I think beer. mmmmm…Beer….

-- John

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#14 posted 04-01-2012 02:26 AM

Wilson, I get little tear out with my 24 tooth Freud Diablo in crosscuts IF I use my ZCI. Otherwise, not as good.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Marlow's profile

Marlow

116 posts in 2137 days


#15 posted 04-01-2012 02:41 AM

I had that vintage BT3000 and it comes with a very nice Freud blade (very underrated in my opinion). I think the stock blade will do a very good job on your flooring, no problem.

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