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Forum topic by David Craig posted 855 days ago 1179 views 0 times favorited 61 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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David Craig

2130 posts in 1714 days


855 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: political manufacturing idea suggestion economy

This topic probably has more interest to the American LJs out there, though all feedback is appreciated…

I would describe myself as more apolitical as I do not consider myself aligned with any political party right now. The economy is obviously in rough shape and I am not anxious to see it get any bleaker. Rather than focus on blame, though, I would rather work on ideas on what might help get things going again. I hear much talk on how we need a new technology, but with the infrastructure already set up overseas, I don’t see new manufacturing hitting the states. The new fluorescent lightbulbs, for example, went straight overseas without any real pit stop in manufacturing here.

I couldn’t help but notice, when looking for a flag to hang from my porch, that I could not find a US flag actually made in the United States. From what I understand, souvenir shops in our state and federal buildings are stocked with items not made in this country. This all started a thought “If there are rules for properly disposing of a flag, why are there not rules on the manufacturing of one?” America is not going to compete price-wise with any item that we manufacturer with the existing trade agreements. Government cannot go into business itself with strictly American made products but we could make laws regarding the use and manufacture of state and federal government symbols. What if we had a list of federally protected national and state symbols (i.e. Uncle Sam, American Flag, Liberty Bell, Declaration of Independence, etc.) that followed certain laws in their creation and use. True that there would have to be certain allowances for creative expression and some things (like the Statue of Liberty that was given to us by France) would not be in the list because it is not ours to regulate.

Imagine how many jobs that would create. State flags and symbolism required to be manufactured in the state of origin and souvenirs in federal shops created in factories evenly distributed across the 50 states. The prices of these things would naturally go up and the citizens would have to consider it almost a patriotic duty to purchase these things. But wouldn’t it be worth it to know that what you purchased was manufactured in this country by materials gathered and produced here? What do you folks think? Some of you have manufacturing backgrounds at adminstrative levels. Do you think this would be logical and/or feasible? I have been kicking around the thought of pushing this idea all the way up the political chain through social media to gain some national support. Do any of you see where this would not work?

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.


61 replies so far

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1779 days


#1 posted 855 days ago

Hm.

I can’t speak for anybody else, on this one, but … personally … I like pie.

And … as we’ve learned, recently … ice cream, too.

Now … the way I see it … it is not an either/or proposition.

I can have ice cream WITH pie, or—conversely—pie WITH ice cream.

Either way … I’m a Happy Boy.

Thanks for listening.

-- -- Neil

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David Craig

2130 posts in 1714 days


#2 posted 855 days ago

Very enlightening Neil. Now the real question…do you like American Pie? Or are you one that views the eating of pie as a multicultural experience? I suppose one would not want to limit themselves in areas involving fine dining :)

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

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NBeener

4806 posts in 1779 days


#3 posted 855 days ago

I mean …

It largely depends on where the “American” pie is made … wouldn’t you think ?

Plus, as Don McLean songs go … I may have liked “Vincent” better, but I DO know ALL the words to “American Pie.”

Which … hasn’t helped … anything … ever.

-- -- Neil

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David Craig

2130 posts in 1714 days


#4 posted 855 days ago

“But I could have told you, Vincent, This world was never meant for one. As beautiful as you…” Brings tears to my eyes every single time Neil.

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

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NBeener

4806 posts in 1779 days


#5 posted 855 days ago

And when no hope was left in sight, on that starry starry night
You took your life as lovers often do.

Ayup. You KNOW you’re officially An Old Person when you get nostalgic and think to yourself, “now THAT was MUSIC.”

:-)

-- -- Neil

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fernandoindia

1072 posts in 1549 days


#6 posted 855 days ago

Hi David. Needless to say I am not an America citizen. However I accept your invitation for my feedback

That same point is actually in discussion worldwide, with the exception of low cost labor, and low tax countries. Mine is no exception.

A lot of local industrialist are quite happy with some kind of protection. In your flag example, I can imagine that the only happy would be the flag makers. Other common american ones as you said, will need to pay more for the same flag made elsewhere. Even if some american people as you, would be willing to “contribute” for the sake of patriotism, IMHO, it is some sort of privatization of taxes. The price surplus of the flag can be considered as a tax, and it will only be collected by flag makers.

I am not very keen of this kind of solutions.

Respectfully,

PS : I guess the best American pie is the one home made :)

-- Back home. Fernando

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NBeener

4806 posts in 1779 days


#7 posted 855 days ago

Okay … here’s my sincere answer, and … truly, in a nutshell.

Unless the continuing rising costs of energy really skyrocket, it’s still a LOT cheaper to make this kind of item offshore. That’s particularly true when they can be shipped a BILLION (or a BAZILLION) units to the shipping container.

So … with domestic cost structures … I think sales would be severely impacted.

Profits would be, too, since the costs would have to be passed along—at least in large part—to the consumer.

Before EVER implementing such an idea, though, companies could do price-sensitivity testing, by changing ONLY the price, in an effort to tease out the elasticity of demand, as price goes up or down.

From there, they could likely project out the sales impact of the domestic cost AND pricing structure.

NONE of which should give ANYBODY the impression that my position on pie OR ice cream … has changed.

-- -- Neil

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1026 days


#8 posted 855 days ago

In Arizona there’s been a law on the books for some time requiring public service vehicles all be made in USA.
No patrol cars are Toyotas or Hondas here.

The problem is, that over the years, even GM and Ford are increasingly using foreign made parts in thier “American Made” cars.

This law is almost irrelevant now, seeing that a majority of USA sold Hondas are assembled in the USA and have nearly the same ratio of “Made in USA” parts versus “Made in Japan” parts as the domestic brands.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View GregD's profile

GregD

608 posts in 1742 days


#9 posted 855 days ago

The pie I like best is custom made, on-site. Some locations produce better pie than others, IMHO.

I’m ok with ice cream imported from out-of-town.

My wife really liked “Vincent” until I pointed out what it was about.

Regarding the original post, I think locally manufactured symbols and suveniors is much better as the basis for a business plan than for protectionist legislation.

-- Greg D.

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NBeener

4806 posts in 1779 days


#10 posted 855 days ago

DS251:

I’m confused. My Subaru is from Indiana. Honda builds many vehicles in Ohio. Toyota makes lots of cars in KY and IN.

And on and on and on.

That’s a curious policy, and … like most issues of manufacture … hard to draw bright lines.

-- -- Neil

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1026 days


#11 posted 855 days ago

I am reminded of a Preacher who was arrested in China for illegally ministering Christianity amongst the population.

He was given 3 years in prison for his crime, where he spent a majority of his time manufacturing Christmas lights for export to the USA. The irony is incredible, but purportedly true.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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NBeener

4806 posts in 1779 days


#12 posted 855 days ago

I miss the apple pie, from Julian, California.

It was a BEAUTIFUL mountain road, up to the mountain town. Famous route for the motorcycle set.

And … yeah … pie made right there, right then.

Inside me is a verrrrry fat guy, just itching to get out. Daily struggle.

-- -- Neil

View derosa's profile

derosa

1532 posts in 1441 days


#13 posted 855 days ago

Don’t know where to weigh in on this one. I can see an argument for requiring that nationalistic items be made in country to keep the symbols nationalistic and that it could potentially help certain industries as there would be no overseas competition but do we wish to be that strict in the use of our national emblems. I’d have to vote no.
Ds251- my toyota’s vin starts with a 1 meaning US made, another example of the irrelevance of the law as you point out.

The best pie is strawberry rhubarb with a custard base. The biggest key is the crust, best made with lard and vodka for a truly flaky crust that simply melts in your mouth.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1721 days


#14 posted 855 days ago

hello David :-)
fine question you bring up what do we do is a big thing since it bring so many questions
to our mind but here is two links …................be aware that the seminarlesson takes 52 minuts
and the interwiew takes about ½ hour

one is a seminar with Joseph Stiglitz
http://www.dr.dk/DR2/Danskernes+akademi/Oekonomi_Ledelse/Den_globale_oekonomiske_krise.htm

A Danish journalist made a program called Clements in amerika
and he interveiwed Joseph Stiglitz
http://www.dr.dk/DR2/Danskernes+akademi/#/29661 (possible not working )
but here is a link about the program serie in english
where you can
see the enterveiw on itunes
http://www.dr.dk/DR2/Clement+i+Amerika/index.htm

I think Stiglitz comes up with some good answers to what has to be done
and he knows something about Oekonomic and what money is …. :-)

take care
Dennis

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1026 days


#15 posted 855 days ago

Then there’s this silk tie that I wear to church. The tag says “Made in America – with foreign materials”

Where do you draw the line?
Do American flags need to not only be made in America, but also use American Fabric?
What about fabric made in the USA with thread and other raw materials from another country?
Can they be packaged in foreign made packaging materials?
Do the shipping palets need to be made with domestic woods?

Where do you draw the line?
Will this have ANY impact on our overall economy?

Welcome to the World economy.
I suggest we learn how to compete in this global arena.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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