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Forum topic by COMO posted 03-26-2012 08:29 PM 1016 views 1 time favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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COMO

25 posts in 967 days


03-26-2012 08:29 PM

I am fairly new to woodworking and have primarily made small projects (boxes, cutting boards, trays) while I try to become more proficient with my tools. Right now I use almost all power tools but know some quality hand tools and the knowledge to use them would help greatly. Right now the only jointer I have is a bench top delta that seems to work fine for my smaller projects. Now I would like to start working on some furniture but don’t think my jointer is going to cut it. I was thinking of looking for a good hand plane to help in joining larger materials. I found a Bailey #5 today at an antique shop for $25 but not real sure if this is a good deal or not or the right plane for what I want to do. My budget right now is 150-200 tops. I eventually need a good set of chisels and some hand saws but a plane for joining larger boards seems to be the more immediate need. If you were in my boat what planes would you look at or am I going at this all wrong? Thanks for any help you can give.


23 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1344 days


#1 posted 03-26-2012 08:33 PM

Well, if you want a plane that excels at jointing, the Stanley #7 or #8 is the ticket. I’ve used a #7 for years before I got a jointer and still use it for most applications. The #8 is a bit unweildy, tippy, and has a steeper learning curve (and is more expensive). You should be able to pick up a really nice vintage #7 for under $100. You could even go all out and add a new modern blade and chipbreaker, still coming out under your budget.
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Hand jointing is 90% technique and 10% plane, IMO. Others might disagree. You’ll never wish you didn’t buy a #7.

Edit: here’s what I’d be looking at, but I’m more of a real early Stanley guy:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/OLD-TOOLS-VINTAGE-ANTIQUE-STANLEY-No-7-OLD-WOOD-PLANE-/180848678693?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a1b6bd725
That’s a very, very desirable jointer to me and I doubt it’ll go higher than $80. Tons of good iron left on that early iron. Not too pretty that the price will be outrageous. Good looking mouth. Good looking totes. Nice shape cap. This one would be a keeper all day for me if I didn’t have four, lol.
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Once you get the plane, you’ll want to fettle it a bit (tune it up). You can go crazy if you want to, but you likely won’t need to. You’ll need a method of sharpening but you can easily find 100 different opinion about that. I’ve used a cheap eclipse jig ($11.00), a Lowe’s marble windowsill ($10.00), spray adhesive ($3.00), and sandpaper for years. I’ve got the fancy stuff but I still use this method.
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If you want to go nuts with your new toy, here’s a nice 01 iron for $40.00
http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2000576/40/hock-o1-238-bench-plane-blade-67.aspx
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You’re going to love this baby.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9887 posts in 1269 days


#2 posted 03-26-2012 08:57 PM

The $25 jack is neither a good deal nor a rip off, if you ask me. If (big if) it’s all present, great. Older? As in before world war 2? Even better. The easiest sure fire indicator of age is the lever cap / logo. No logo? Pre-Depression era. Kidney-shaped hole for the screw? Mid to late thiries and beyond.

A quality (solid, all-present, able to be fettled, as Al describes so well above) jack (#5) combined with a #7 of the same ilk should run about $100 combined, maybe less if you’re patient. WIth those, you’ll be on your way to edge jointing in no time. Use the jack to hog off lots of material agressively, and the jointer to make straight as possible. Good luck!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1648 days


#3 posted 03-26-2012 09:01 PM

Many years ago a #5 and a block plane were standard. The other planes are nice. As Bertha said the #7 is a great jointer. #6 will work as well.
I do know once you start with one….................................it never ends…......................experience talking here.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3515 posts in 1129 days


#4 posted 03-26-2012 09:05 PM

I just got a nice bedrock 607 to sell it is a early round top model but it is great one and i will check with my business partner and see what he needs to get for it so you will get a good price. this is the right size for you to plane with and joint with . do you have a bench and a way to clamp your wood for edge jointing?

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1019 days


#5 posted 03-26-2012 09:06 PM

I use a #7 also. I have a #8 too but it seems I never build a piece big enough to use it. I do use it sometimes for flattening large tops. Get a #5, #7, #8 and you’ll be in handplane heaven.

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5383 posts in 1883 days


#6 posted 03-26-2012 09:08 PM

I started with a #4, then added the #5, #6, #7 and a low angle block plane…

I don’t use the little block plane all that much…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4138 posts in 1602 days


#7 posted 03-26-2012 09:16 PM

You’re gonna get a number of varying opinions, and so here is mine. If I had to narrow it down to three bench planes, I’d get the 4 1/2, the 5, and the 7, which will give you a smoothing plane, a jack plane, and a jointer plane. It’s easy to add to this list, as most of us have much more than three planes, but this is where I’d start.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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Brandon

4138 posts in 1602 days


#8 posted 03-26-2012 09:17 PM

I should add that a consensus seems to be emerging; the 5 and the 7 are essential. :-)

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View Don W's profile

Don W

15017 posts in 1218 days


#9 posted 03-26-2012 09:23 PM

I've got a few for sale. (LJ’s get a discount)

I would suggest a minimum of a #6 for a jointer. Really you want a #7 or #8.

A #5 is a common place to start because they are pretty easy to come by.

If I were in your shoes, I’d find a #7 for a jointer and a nice #3 or #4 for a smoother.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View KenBry's profile

KenBry

449 posts in 1098 days


#10 posted 03-26-2012 09:41 PM

Here is a great Video selection on Finewoodworkers site. Teaches allot in a short time. The essential handplane http://www.finewoodworking.com/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id=29680

From everything I have looked at, get the #4, 7 and a Sholder plane. Take in a Nice little block plane and you should not need another plane.

That being said, I started out with a LN164 = Low angle #4 & LN Block Plane. Now I have a Stanley #4, #7, LN #5, #2 so I am up to 6 planes and plan on getting a #3 and #6 of some make or the other. But going to get a good Shoulder plane first.

These things are adictive

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

View KPW's profile

KPW

223 posts in 1019 days


#11 posted 03-26-2012 09:56 PM

Como, I hope you realize you’ve started an out of control post. I think the consesus will be: block plane, #4, #5, #7. then however you’re addiction and wallet will take you. Have fun and welcome to the best site on the web.

-- Ken --------- never try and put 5 lbs. of tenon in a 3 lb. mortise.

View COMO's profile

COMO

25 posts in 967 days


#12 posted 03-26-2012 10:14 PM

Lots of options. I love looking at all of them online but am still fairly unsure of what I am looking at. I have no doubt I will end up with multiple planes. I was curious also about winchester planes. I grew up collecting winchester guns and thought it would be cool to blend the two hobbies. I found one at a shop here in town but not sure I would use it or just put it up on a shelf. I can already see this is going to get ugly on the pocket book. Thanks for all the help so far. It seems people seem to really like the stanleys. Is it worth putting extra money for new planes or just be patient?

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COMO

25 posts in 967 days


#13 posted 03-26-2012 10:15 PM

thedude- Let me know on the price. Would this be a good plane to start a collection of working tools?

View Don W's profile

Don W

15017 posts in 1218 days


#14 posted 03-26-2012 10:21 PM

the bedrock 607 is a great place to start!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9887 posts in 1269 days


#15 posted 03-26-2012 10:43 PM

If you’ve got patience, re: Winchesters. I’ve personally not seen but one or two in person, no recall as to if they were quality tools. Starting with a bedrock? The majority position among Stanley folks is tha’s their best line. There is a collector’s premium of, oh, maybe 20-30% on them in terms of price. It is what it is, but they won’t lose value.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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