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Jointer dust hoods?

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Forum topic by Matt Przybylski posted 03-26-2012 12:58 AM 1519 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1131 days


03-26-2012 12:58 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer dust dust hood woodchips

Hey all,
I just purchased the HF 6” jointer off CL for $100 and got a chance to test it out before I bought it. This is my first jointer but it seemed to work well and as with all jointers it spat shavings onto the ground like i was cutting down a tree. I’ve looked into dust hoods for jointers but the chute is of an irregular size, something like 7×10” and most hoods are square. Here are my questions:

1) does anyone have this jointer and did something for the hood to connect a 4” hose? Pictures would be great if you have them.

2) since a bunch of jointers are identical to this issue, how have others with different jointers solved this problem? Again, pictures would be ideal if you have them.

Thanks for any insight offered.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com


12 replies so far

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1803 days


#1 posted 03-26-2012 05:38 AM

Matt,

Make your own. A piece of plywood cut to fit the opening with a hole towards the bottom to which you can attach a generic 4” outlet will work fine and cost about 5$. But, as the chips are of good size and go straight to the floor instead of becoming airborn, why bother? I just sweep them up and dump in the can at the end of the day. Takes a couple minutes. Good score. That’s an EXCELLENT jointer. Get a jointer honing from someplace like Woodcrap and keeb the blades sharp, and they’ll last for years.

Steve

PS Be sure, if you build your own, to make the hole a little oversized and chamfer the edge inside to form a sort of chute to keep the chips from hanging up.

PPS Lovely Irish name, by the way.

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

2047 posts in 1246 days


#2 posted 03-26-2012 11:33 AM

Yep, a piece of 1/4” plywood with an 4” HVAC starter collar on it gets you in business.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1131 days


#3 posted 03-26-2012 02:00 PM

Thanks for the replies guys. I was going to order one of these (because its really cheap at Tools Plus and because I have to order a dust hood for my planer and shipping doesnt change) http://www.tools-plus.com/woodstock-w1001.html and use some plywood to build around it out as far as i need to.

Do I need to seal off around the ply where it touches the machine? Ive read some people use weatherstripping and i also thought of silicone (though I guess that would make it permanent, or at least until i cut it off, which may not necessarily be bad). Thoughts?

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1821 days


#4 posted 03-26-2012 02:59 PM

Matt -
I would attach the ply to the machine with some sheet metal screws then seal the edges with metal duct tape. This would let you remove the DC conection if necessary with minimal hassle.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View patron's profile

patron

13182 posts in 2094 days


#5 posted 03-26-2012 03:31 PM

here is what we are talking about

this is my 12 year old uni-saw
to this day there is no factory or add on chute for this saw
earlier and later have them but not mine
so here is what i did to collect sawdust
i made the front to open with a little magnetic latch
to keep the dust from wedging it open
and loosing suction
i can open it and with a stick
rake it all down if needed
or retrieve the nut for the blade if dropped inside

there is a big swing out door on the other side of the saw
but as i have a shelf for everything there
i don’t bother with it

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1131 days


#6 posted 03-26-2012 03:35 PM

Ah, thanks David!

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View patron's profile

patron

13182 posts in 2094 days


#7 posted 03-26-2012 03:40 PM

glad to help
i don’t worry about drilling/screwing to my tools

after all they are mine
so i do what works for me
if i ever sell them
the next guy will benefit too
from any add-ons
(which would go with the tool
as i wouldn’t need them anymore)

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1131 days


#8 posted 03-26-2012 03:43 PM

the screws that hold the dust hood to the ply and the ply to the machine, are those all machine screws? Do they have nuts on the other side? I don’t use machine screws very often so I’m not sure the best procedure for this.

Also, my jointer already has some screws around this area that I believe are actually holding the dust chute in place (the chute, not the hood, the chute is like an inverted chute into the top of the machine on a diagonal) so could I just unscrew those, put the holes on the ply where those are, and re-screw to hold it in place?

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View patron's profile

patron

13182 posts in 2094 days


#9 posted 03-26-2012 03:53 PM

for ply to sheet machine i use sheet metal screws
i don’t worry about the ones that hold the machine together
maybe dimple for them to get a better seal
most stands have to be inverted to get to the insides
so i just work from the outside
with the tool sitting normal
for the pick-up plastic to ply
just some wood screws or even deck screws will do
i just put them where they don’t bottom out
on the metal stand
(or you could over drill the metal if necessary
or use sheet metal ones there too)

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 1803 days


#10 posted 03-26-2012 03:55 PM

Matt,

Use Screws, not Bolts. Machine screws or even drywall screws work fine. Self-drilling and self-tapping make drywall screws the winner.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

468 posts in 1131 days


#11 posted 03-26-2012 03:57 PM

thanks guys, appreciate the help. i’ll give it a shot probably this weekend, need to order the hood.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View patron's profile

patron

13182 posts in 2094 days


#12 posted 03-26-2012 04:02 PM

self drilling screws are good too

you can get them at any hardware store
different brand names for many
they come in phillips and hex head

just over drill the wood first so it doesn’t
‘walk up’ the screw thread

http://www.fastenersuperstore.com/screws/Self_Drilling-Screws?utm_campaign=4643&utm_term=3400573&utm_medium=google&utm_source=trada&utm_content=3010046402_10944278882

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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