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Bandsaw Blade - rounding the back

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Forum topic by Tig1242 posted 03-25-2012 04:13 AM 5035 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tig1242

14 posts in 1730 days


03-25-2012 04:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw

I have been reading about bandsaws and about rounding the back of the blade. Does everyone do this, why? on all blades?

What do you use to round the back of the blade?

Thanks.


23 replies so far

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1488 posts in 2820 days


#1 posted 03-25-2012 05:08 AM

I do, I have a little stone on a board made for doing that but probably any stone will work, some use sandpaper.

It removes the sharp edges that may catch while cutting curves.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 2160 days


#2 posted 03-25-2012 12:01 PM

I do it on my scrollsaw blades too.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View wingate_52's profile

wingate_52

224 posts in 2037 days


#3 posted 03-25-2012 01:50 PM

Carborundum stone epoxied to a handle.

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 2518 days


#4 posted 03-26-2012 06:20 AM

I use a Nicholson smooth mill file. Rounding the edges gives you a smoother cut as the edges don’t hang up in tight turns. Blades last longer too because of less stress and heat.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View philip marcou's profile

philip marcou

262 posts in 2064 days


#5 posted 03-26-2012 08:31 AM

It is good practice because it prolongs blade life and gives smoother cuts. In the same drawer as relieving tension on the blade when the saw is not in use.
I use my die grinder to round the back off when the blade is on for the first time and there is usually a need to smooth out the butt weld.

View Rick's profile

Rick

8287 posts in 2500 days


#6 posted 03-26-2012 08:56 AM

This shows a Sharpening Stone Epoxied to a Wooden Handle. Same as mine.

It makes getting around tight corners a lot easier, ...easier to “Back Out” of the cut if you have to, ....less friction on corners equals less heat to the blade, ...prevents those little lines on your wood that are left on a tight cut so less Finishing required after the Band Saw cut,... and for me it seems to give me more control on the overall cut, i.e. the Back of the Blade is not digging in during small movements.

I would suggest a few drops of oil on the stone prior to using. That also helps to clean the Stone after use.

You can also give yourself a nice smooth Manicure with the Stone. If your Nails are REALLY Long, run them through the Band Saw first. JUST KIDDING!!! (Toe Nails Only).

This one’s for FREE!!

If your Mitre gauge is as sloppy as mine was on my RYOBI 9” Table Top Band Saw.

You can try “Dimpling” the edges as shown to tighten it up. I did four on each edge then a light filing to smooth them off a little. Obviously this can also be done to other types of “Saw Mitre Gauges” as well . Worked nicely for me.

Have Fun!!

Rick

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

View wee3's profile

wee3

76 posts in 1739 days


#7 posted 03-26-2012 05:41 PM

Nice tip,i will try it on my scroll saw.

-- BiLL @wee3

View Rick's profile

Rick

8287 posts in 2500 days


#8 posted 03-28-2012 09:55 AM

Tig:

Are you watching This (YOUR) Post? You Signed up Eleven Days ago and put this up Three Days Ago and No Response.

Nothing in Your Profile and you’ve been Off The Site ever since you Posted this???

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2801 days


#9 posted 03-28-2012 07:33 PM

Don’t worry Rick, someone got some good out of your advice anyway. Maybe Tig is stranded on a desert island somewhere without an internet connection.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Tig1242's profile

Tig1242

14 posts in 1730 days


#10 posted 03-28-2012 08:43 PM

Thanks for the information.

I don’t currently own a stone, I do have dremel tool attachments with stones but not sure if that is the same.

What would be a good thing to look for price and size wise?

View Brett_J's profile

Brett_J

3 posts in 1718 days


#11 posted 03-28-2012 11:12 PM

Hi guys, I’m new here.

It’s my understanding that many blades have a radius put on it at the factory that makes the blade. But if the edge looks or feels sharp then it probably was not done at production time and it would be wise to round it yourself.

View Rick's profile

Rick

8287 posts in 2500 days


#12 posted 03-29-2012 05:02 AM

stefang: I think you’re right! If it was of some value to you and others, that Pleases me. THAT’s what I believe LJ’s is all about.

Brett: I have bought many Band Saw Blades. NONE of them have ever been rounded. I don’t believe it’s a practice to do so during the Manufacturing of the Blade.

However if …”It’s my understanding that many blades have a radius put on it at the factory that makes the blade.” I’m sure We’d all be pleased to know who the Company/ies are that perform that procedure if you’d care to fill us in.

Tig: Thanks for dropping by. NO. The Dremel Attachments are not the same thing. “What would be a good thing to look for price and size wise?” What ALL of the Posters above have mentioned and the picture shows!!!

This is a Waste of Time and Effort. AGAIN.

I’m OUTTA here!!

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

View Tig1242's profile

Tig1242

14 posts in 1730 days


#13 posted 03-29-2012 02:42 PM

OK color me ignorant but when I went to look online at sharpening stones there are plenty of then out there and I have no clue what I am looking for or at.

Water stone/ oil stone?
Grit?
SIC?

wingate_52 mentioned Carborundum stone

I don’t know a sharpening stone from one in my garden, could someone give me a suggestion on specs or does it not matter?

According to Rick the stones on my dremel won’t do the trick but I have no idea what to get so I don’t wind up buying something else that won’t work.

All of the stones I am seeing are much thicker than all of the photos, the ones in the pictures of the posts above the stones seem 1×1x4 or 1×1/4×4. The stones I am finding online are like 5×2x3/4.

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 2518 days


#14 posted 03-29-2012 03:39 PM

Tig,

Any flat stone will work. All you’re doing is rounding the back of the blade while it’s running. Any common sharpening stone works, but cheaper is better as the process is hard on the stone. For this reason, I use a fine mill file that caN BE FOund at any hardware store.

For a ton of information on everything woodworking, start at this site; www.woodgears.ca. This link—http://woodgears.ca/bandsaw/stoning.html--will take you to the exact answer to your question. Peruse the site thouroughly and you will be amazed at what you find. Remember, the only stupid question is the one you DON’T ask.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View Tig1242's profile

Tig1242

14 posts in 1730 days


#15 posted 03-29-2012 04:00 PM

When I do a search on woodcraft.com for a mill file I get Burnisher, Oval that looks like a round mettle rod.

Is that what you are talking about?

The site and link were interesting thanks, the article did bring up something I haven’t seen before. The article was talking about grinding the blade flat. Everything I have seen or read before only mentioned grinding (rounding/smoothing) the back of the blade.

I thought the teeth of the blade were offset to create a larger curf and that was a good thing so the blade didn’t bind.

How do I know the hardness of a stone?

If I just get a cheep sharpening stone off ebay it should be OK? (or look into the fine mill stone like you suggested.)

Also how do I know when the back is rounded? (just a quick pass with the stone should do or are we talking a few min.)

showing 1 through 15 of 23 replies

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