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Delta Dust Collector 240v Wiring?

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Forum topic by Joekwon80 posted 879 days ago 1597 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joekwon80

87 posts in 887 days


879 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: dust collector wiring electricity plugs

I have found how to wire it. But my question is what kind of plug do I need and what kind of wire do I need for the plug? I haven’t wired the receptacle yet, because I haven’t bought the plug yet.

Are all 240 volt plugs the same? I don’t know much about electricity if you can’t tell.

I am running the wiring for the receptacle to the sub panel tomorrow but I also haven’t bought the breaker to go in the sub panel yet either. What kind of breaker do I need? I don’t know what amperage the DC draws. It’s a Delta 50-760.

-- Joe Kwon


26 replies so far

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BlankMan

1487 posts in 1977 days


#1 posted 879 days ago

Looking at the plug with the ground pin at the bottom if the two blades on the plug are horizontal it’s a NEMA6-15, if one is horizontal and one if vertical it’s a NEMA6-20. My guess it’s a NEMA6-15, or should be because that motor doesn’t draw more then 15A at 240V.

If the circuit wired to the outlet is 20A you can install a NEMA6-20 outlet which either plug will plug in to. If the circuit is only 15A you should install a NEMA6-15 outlet. Since you’re wiring it get a 20A breaker and use 12ga wire and use the NEMA6-20 outlet.

Oh and besides these two types of 240V plugs/outlets there are even more.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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oxyoke

57 posts in 978 days


#2 posted 879 days ago

There should be tag on your motor and your manual with amps and voltage information and I also agree with curt.Welcome to lumberjocks.

-- Bill Byron Center MI

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Joekwon80

87 posts in 887 days


#3 posted 879 days ago

I’m going to purchase a new circuit. I am somewhat of an idiot. I didn’t realize the information for the power draw was on the side of the motor itself. IT says for 240v it pulls. 7.4A so I’m going to install the same everything as my unisaw. 3 prong with a 250v 20a rating and the matching receptacle. Does that sound about right? all going to a 15A double pole circuit.

-- Joe Kwon

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Joekwon80

87 posts in 887 days


#4 posted 879 days ago

Thanks Oxyoke! I’ve had fun being here on this site. Definitely the most active I’ve been on a forum ever. There is all sorts of knowledge to soak in on this forum.

-- Joe Kwon

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BlankMan

1487 posts in 1977 days


#5 posted 879 days ago

Well if you’re using a 15A breaker you really shouldn’t use a 20A outlet it will work just fine but probably isn’t code. I’d use 20A breakers as long as you’re doing it, less chance of blowing a breaker. And if the saw is a 3HP it’s motor nameplate probably says 12-13A at 240V and turning it on the inrush could pop a 15A breaker. Especially if anything else is using the same circuit.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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Joekwon80

87 posts in 887 days


#6 posted 879 days ago

AH! Right. so 20A breaker and 20a outlet. I keep getting that wrong. You can go smaller on the wall but not the other way around right?

-- Joe Kwon

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BobM001

388 posts in 955 days


#7 posted 879 days ago

Perhaps just for the sake of “safety” you may want to consider a 20 amp 230V twist lock plug/recepticle for this. That way no other device could be “accidentally” plugged into that power source.

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

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BlankMan

1487 posts in 1977 days


#8 posted 879 days ago

And, you might be then able to run the 3HP saw on the dust collector on that same 20A circuit. The dust collector will draw close to what the motor on it says, but the table saw will not.

I have two 20A 240V circuits in my shop, and four 240V machines. A 3HP Unisaw, DJ-20 jointer, 12” RAS, and Oneida cyclone, so I believe two are on each circuit. I might have the Unisaw by itself the the other three on the other circuit, hm, going to have to check that out, I think it’s marked on the breaker box.

The cyclone, of course, will always be running with any of the other three machines and I’ve never blown a breaker. One man shop one machine running. Now that my curiosity has been peaked I may turn all four on and see what happens.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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Joekwon80

87 posts in 887 days


#9 posted 879 days ago

I like how you think Bob. However, this is a dedicated line for the DC so I am not worried about accidentally plugging in anything else. How about hard wiring the DC? Is that possible? Just a wall mounted switch next to the TS so I don’t have to walk into the garage to turn on the DC?

-- Joe Kwon

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BlankMan

1487 posts in 1977 days


#10 posted 879 days ago

Bob, how do you accidentally plug a 120V plug into a NEMA6-15 or NEMA6-20 outlet? Can’t be done unless you take a pliers and twist one or both of the blades and that’s no accident.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

3870 posts in 953 days


#11 posted 879 days ago

Your outlet should look like this….

And your plug should look like this….

Wire the circuit with 12-2 Romex and a 20 amp die pole breaker.

one flat prong wires to black… hot leg 1
one flat prong wires to white… hot leg 2
third prong wires to bare copper…. ground

not hard to do…

some guys may use an electric dryer plug… but those are intended for very high amps and are serious overkill.

you want to use the right plugs, as someday, somebody may try to plug a 120 or high amp 220 device/appliance into your outlet and fry themselves or burn the house down.

you can use the appropriate twist lock plug as well… but I’ve only used them on generator hook ups.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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Joekwon80

87 posts in 887 days


#12 posted 879 days ago

I can use 14/3 wiring for the cable right? 2 hot, one ground?

-- Joe Kwon

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Joekwon80

87 posts in 887 days


#13 posted 879 days ago

I am not concerned about anyone plugging anything into the 240 recept. It’s in my own garage and the only other person in the house is my girlfriend. And she knows the basement is my man cave (AKA storage unit soon to be wood shop).

ssnvet does it HAVE to be like that plug? Can I not use another kind of 3 prong 250v plug?

-- Joe Kwon

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BlankMan

1487 posts in 1977 days


#14 posted 879 days ago

Joe, um, well not really, you’re not supposed to go smaller at the outlet. The caveat to that is they let you put 15A 120V outlets on 20A circuits, or at least they used to, that may have changed. With 240V it’s probably ok because if you if you put a NEMA6-15 outlet on a 20A circuit you can’t plug anything into it that draws more then 15A so you’re not in danger of overloading the outlet.

My cyclone is hardwired but it’s stationary, mounted to the wall, and flexible conduit goes right to the motor junction box. But I wouldn’t hardwire that Delta, no real reason to. And the more machines you get the more 240V outlet you might need and the flexibility having outlets may come in handy.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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BlankMan

1487 posts in 1977 days


#15 posted 879 days ago

Not if you have a 20A breaker, you need 12/3.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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