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Forum topic by BobM001 posted 03-23-2012 03:28 PM 10622 views 0 times favorited 37 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BobM001

388 posts in 1797 days


03-23-2012 03:28 PM

I’ve been looking at a lot of BIG circular saws for doing timber framing. The “Bigfoot” add on based on the Skil worm drive and others. This deal on the Milwaukee 6470-21 was just to good to pass up. List is $592. FREE UPS Next Day Air shipping! It comes with a STEEL case. This thing is a BEAST. Electronic brake, auto stop for 45 deg bevel with a push button override to go to 60 deg. FIVE YEAR warranty. Can’t wait to do some shoulder cuts on tenons and cross cuts for stock removal on the cheeks before chisel paring/planing. This coupled with a Prazi beam cutter on a Skil HD5865 8 1/4 worm drive and I think I’m just about good to go.

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?


37 replies so far

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Doss

779 posts in 1731 days


#1 posted 03-23-2012 04:17 PM

I’ve been looking at those as I see them go up for sale somewhat regularly around here (in Mississippi… don’t know why).

I cut my own lumber and sometimes end up with 3 or 4 inch thick pieces that I can’t cut with a circular saw and are way too heavy to put on a tablesaw or pass through a bandsaw.

For now, I built a jig (a rail with a carrier) for my smaller chainsaw that I use to cut my slabs into manageable pieces.

Let us know how well the Bigfoot works. I just wasn’t sure it was going to have enough power to cut what I cut.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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crank49

3981 posts in 2437 days


#2 posted 03-23-2012 04:47 PM

Why not just go for the 16” Mikita

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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Doss

779 posts in 1731 days


#3 posted 03-23-2012 05:00 PM

There are also attachments to turn your circ saw into a mini chainsaw.

I just think I’d only get limited use out of such an item… even though it’d be cool to have.

-- "Well, at least we can still use it as firewood... maybe." - Doss

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Mainiac Matt

5999 posts in 1795 days


#4 posted 03-23-2012 05:11 PM

When I built my DIY TF back in the dark ages, I looked very seriously at the 10” Milwaukee. It’s a very well made saw and I think you’ll love it for the type of joinery work you described.

The key to these big saws, imho, is the base. And the Milwaukee has a good one.

I was fortunate enough to get a lot of advice and help from a “real” timber framer who had a 16” Makita that was tricked out with an oversized 1/4” aluminum saw base that kept the blade plumb to the base and allowed for accurate depth and angle settings. These bases were custom made buy a guy in the Timber Framers Guild and sold to a small number of his colleagues. Back in the day, timber framers were quite the eclectic niche and they were very helpfull and willing to share their knowledge and skill. This guy lent me his 16” Makita, a Holzer chain mortice and a 12” Makita power hand planer for several weeks. I cut the frame in 1/10th the time it would have taken otherwise.

I’ve since used two other 16” Makitas on multiple occasions and without the base upgrade, the saw is seriously lacking. It’s good for cross cutting timbers on horses to length and that’s about it. The base flexes under the significant weight of the saw and can’t hold square, let alone an angle. The last time I used one was when I build my pole barn 2.5 yrs ago. I was trimming a post while aloft and the base flexed, binding the blade and almost threw me :^O

I did wind up getting the 8” Milwaukee instead, and it has been my only CS till date. It has the same 15 amp motor as the 10” and you simply can’t kill it. Serious power! I’ve blind ripped hard wood 5×7 stock (rip, flip, and rip the other side), and it never so much as blinked.

You won’t be disappointed.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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FirehouseWoodworking

689 posts in 2740 days


#5 posted 03-23-2012 05:33 PM

We have two of them at work on our Rescue Trailers, one the older model, and the second the new model which you show here. Amongst other things, we teach firefighters Urban Search & Rescue type training and use these saws in our Structural Collapse and Trench Rescue courses. They get heavy use in cutting 4×4s, both cross cutting and ripping our wedges and shims.

The biggest issue in training firefighters to use them is that the initial impression is “This is just a circular saw, how difficult can it be?” They are just not expecting the power and torque these babies put out.

Our older saw had a pressed sheet steel shoe and the new one has what looks like a cast base. With the older one, we occasionally had to do some maintenance because the saw was dropped and the show got bent. No biggie. No such problems with the new model. I also like the forward grip on the new model better than the screw-on forward grip of the older one.

They get used and abused and just keep on cutting!

I cannot say enough good things about these saws. You will enjoy your saw.

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

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BobM001

388 posts in 1797 days


#6 posted 03-23-2012 05:42 PM

“Why not just go for the 16” Mikita”
Because I like to BUY AMERICAN anytime I can. Because Milwaukee has been tools used by me during my time working in the trades and I know of their quality/reliability. I have their deep cut VS Port-A- Band saw and it’s THEE FINEST on the planet! A Milwaukee 2 speed/VS Sawzall too. Often copied, never equalled. The shoe on the Makita I feel is way to small for the size of the saw. It’s also stamped steel. The shoe on the Milwaukee is 9” wide and 1/4” thick aluminum. The Milwaukee FIVE year warranty vs Makita’s ONE year was a factor as well. Do you get a steel case with Makita tools? NOPE.

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#7 posted 03-23-2012 05:45 PM

Last time I used a 15” circular saw, I realized how important a sharp blade is. Rental centers!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

5999 posts in 1795 days


#8 posted 03-23-2012 05:52 PM

another plus the 10” has going for it…

availability, selection and price of blades….

the 16” Makita carbide blade runs $130, and is pretty much a general purpose blade

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2437 days


#9 posted 03-23-2012 09:32 PM

““Why not just go for the 16” Mikita”
Because I like to BUY AMERICAN” by BobM001

I bought a “Milwaukee Sawzall” exactly because, at the time (2010), it was the only recip saw made in the USA. Since then I bought a Milwaukee 1/2” drill and 1/4” impact driver combo and a Milwaukee cordless circular saw. Everything since the Sawzall was made in China. I seriously doubt there is a circular saw on the market today that is made in the USA.

I personally wish American companies could not market crap made in China under the same brand name as the American built products they built their reputation on. But, nobody asked me.

As far as that goes, Mikita tools used to be Japanese built products, but today they are also made in China. Might as well get used to it.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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BobM001

388 posts in 1797 days


#10 posted 03-24-2012 02:50 AM

Much to my chagrin on a small foil sticker on the motor reads:
Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp
Brookfield WI 53005 USA
Professionally Made in China by
Milwaukee Electric Tool, PRC

SUMBITCH! Well. at least the profits come back here. I think I’m going to fire off a rather “terse” email to the “Milwaukee Electric Tool Corp USA” and tell them just what I think of their manufacturing policies as to “non disclosure”. I’m with you “Crank”. There oughta be a law that says point blank where items are made by USA companies. But I guess I’d be wasting electrons traveling through cyberspace. My 2004 Chevy PU was made in Canada while the engine was built in Silao, Mexico. Pardon my French but, FUCK A BUNCH O’ “GLOBAL ECONOMY”!

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

View RandyM68's profile

RandyM68

693 posts in 1784 days


#11 posted 03-24-2012 03:02 AM

Of course it’s built in China, if they tried to build one here, you couldn’t afford it anyway.

-- I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you. I'm sorry,thanks.

View bench_dogg's profile

bench_dogg

63 posts in 2604 days


#12 posted 03-24-2012 03:15 AM

Well, at least it was made by professionals.

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BobM001

388 posts in 1797 days


#13 posted 03-24-2012 03:20 AM

Just in case someone is “interested”. It’s NIB. Milwaukee 10 1/4. Better move FAST!

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

View devann's profile

devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#14 posted 03-24-2012 07:26 AM

Bob, watch out for the Prazi. I bought one like the picture above around 16 years ago. Used it a couple times. You can propably do a better job with a real chain saw. The Prazi just left me feeling like I had a big hole in my pocket where my money used to be. It laid in my tool box in my old truck till I sold the truck. Good riddance.
.

It’s a shame about the Millwaukees. I looked at buying a new Millwaukee cordless drill sometime in the 1980s. Sitting next to one was a Panasonic that looked identical except for the color. I looked at the tags on both, and both were made by Panasonic.

Beams saws, I’ve had one of those 16” Makitas for a long, long time. It has served me well. Cut a lot of timber roof trusses, beams for bridges, and exterior stair stringers with that thing. It looks nothing like the photo above. Mine is all metal, kinda gold in color, yes the shoe on the Makita is narrow. But all 16” saws I ever seen are the same. They’re that way for a reason, 16”s is a lot of blade spinnig.

If you live close by and you’re interested I have a 16” Ryobi beam saw I’ll part with cheap, real cheap, Like $35.00 cheap, about all it’s worth. It’s well used but still it works ok. Needs new brushes and has a steel blade, no carbide. You really need a 16” carbide tip blade on one of these and they aint cheap, $200.00 +range. You might find an 16” Irwin for $125-150.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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BobM001

388 posts in 1797 days


#15 posted 03-24-2012 03:17 PM

Just out of curiousity what was your biggest issue with the Prazi? Mine hasn’t been used and if it has “issues” I can still return it in the original box. I’m afraid East Texas is a “fir piece” to travel for your saw. I appreciate your offer and comments. BTW, I won that 10 1/4 Milwaukee on eBay. New in the box for $224. My buddy’s commercial UPS account gets it shipped to me for $14. It’s a BEEEUTEEFUL thing! I know I can make at least a Ben Franklin if I sell it.

As for the cordless drills. I’ve tried ‘em all and I LOVE my 15.6V Panasonic. That 1/2” driver drill will bust your wrist in low gear.

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

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