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Pinning cutting boards for glue ups

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Forum topic by AandCstyle posted 858 days ago 1114 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AandCstyle

1257 posts in 858 days


858 days ago

I have seen a few references to people using a pin nailer to prevent a glue up from sliding around while the glue sets. As I understand it, a pin is nailed into one side leaving it about 1/4 inch proud, the glue is applied then a clamp is used to squeeze the 2 parts together. Obviously, alignment during the last part is critical.

My questions are:
1. Is this really a good way to hasten the gluing process? Is it more trouble than it is worth?
2. Do I have the procedure correct?
3. Do people use an 18G brad and cut the head off or use a 23G pin?
4. If this isn’t the correct forum, which one is?

TIA for all comments and suggestions.
A&C Style

-- Art


9 replies so far

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GrandpaLen

1469 posts in 874 days


#1 posted 858 days ago

An 18G Brad Nailer is would be overkill on a cutting board.

A 23G Pinner would be much better, but you won’t leave it proud of the surface. You would pin each segment to the next after applying the glue.

I have used the small brad standing proud with the head snipped off to stablize wider boards when glueing face to face but those would have to be driven in by hand and in my opinion not so good for your application.

The use of a pin nailer frees up clamps if you need them elsewhere but you would still use clamps while pinning and glueing segments together.

Glue, clamp, pin, remove clamps and repeat.

Best wishes for a successful build.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 2082 days


#2 posted 858 days ago

I just use Bessey K body clamps and no nails. That seems to work fine. If I have a lot of pieces I sometimes glue 4 or 5 strips, then when that sets, I do 4 or 5 more etc.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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AandCstyle

1257 posts in 858 days


#3 posted 857 days ago

Thanks for all the input so far. I have and use Bessey K body clamps and still get slippage. I have also tried using curved cauls, but find that I don’t have enough hands to apply 2-3 clamps across the board, a pair of curved cauls on each end (top and bottom) and another pair to hold the keep the ends perfectly aligned. Any other suggestions?

-- Art

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SnowyRiver

51451 posts in 2082 days


#4 posted 857 days ago

You might be putting too much glue on each strip. I take a stiff brush and level the glue on each piece, lay them on the Bessey clamps, push down with one hand and with the other hand tighten the clamps. I always maike the strips a little thicker than the end product. On a 3/4 inch thick board, I usually use strips about 7/8. Once the glue is dry, I run it through the planer, cut the ends to size, and then finish sand it.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View RickLoDico's profile

RickLoDico

55 posts in 1662 days


#5 posted 857 days ago

Sounds like all you need is practice. Dealing with glue and cutting boards gets easier with every board. Don’t bother with the nails.

-- He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.

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AandCstyle

1257 posts in 858 days


#6 posted 857 days ago

Rick, thanks for the encouragement. I just completed my third and it is okay, but for me the issue is the time consumed in the glue ups. I only glue sets of 2 pieces together at a time to avoid slippage. Then I have to wait a half hour before continuing to the next batch. I am hoping for ways to speed the process.
Art

-- Art

View woody123's profile

woody123

48 posts in 1908 days


#7 posted 857 days ago

When I glue my cutting boards together I get a little slippage but I just trim the edges even after the glue dries.

View rkober's profile

rkober

125 posts in 894 days


#8 posted 857 days ago

What has really helped me is a glueing jig or board (or whatever it’s called) to square and clamp against. I’ve seen different configurations but what I have is 3/4” plywood with grooves routed in it and oak pieces on two sides at 90 deg. The board gets waxed so the glue doesn’t stick then you go to work. I glue all the pieces at the same time and use a grooved putty knife so I get uniform spread (just one side in the Wood Whisperer fashion). Turn and clamp with the Bessy K clamps (in both directions against the glue board “fences”). I use a couple straight culls to hold it flat and against the glue board. You still have some planing to do but I’ve had much better luck with this approach.

-- Ray - Spokane, WA - “Most people don’t recognize opportunity because it’s usually disguised as hard work.” - Unknown

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AandCstyle

1257 posts in 858 days


#9 posted 856 days ago

rkober, thanks for this tip. I made one and it does help a great deal. The glue ups are definitely easier. Can you provide more info on the grooved putty knife?

-- Art

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