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The Original Tormek T-7 Thread

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Forum topic by thedude50 posted 862 days ago 4396 views 1 time favorited 49 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thedude50

3503 posts in 1079 days


862 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: tormek sharpening wood turning planes plane irons gouges skew parting tool jet worksharp

Ok for those of us fortunate enough to own one the Tormek T-7 is the ultimate sharpening system but it may intimidate a novice user into a state of tool ownership, I call Tool Collecting. These are the want to be woodworkers that buy lots of tools and never do a project. Because they wont spend money on wood this affliction is ramp it on the west coast where wood prices are so out of line with the rest of the country.

If a tool intimidates you you wont use it and if that tool is your Tormek then this thread is going to change this for you I am currently working on a book about how to use your Tormek and this thread will act as your chance to contribute to the book. Also this is your chance to give your two cents on this wonderful tool. how to make it do what you need are you a turner a tool sharpener or a professional who uses the tool commercially you input is needed. did you just spend a load of money on your Tormek and are afraid to use it or you simply don’t get it or you want to point out areas that the tool fell short . Post all about your Tormek or if your on the fence and need advise from owners if its worth the price post your questions here.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech


49 replies so far

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Don W

14646 posts in 1169 days


#1 posted 862 days ago

wow. You need a book to operate it?

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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Dave

11142 posts in 1441 days


#2 posted 862 days ago

I love mine the biggest problem I have is the flattening of the backs of blades or chisels. They want you to use the side of the stone. I find it is easier to use my worksharp to flatten the backs of blades. Other than that I love it.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1079 days


#3 posted 861 days ago

actually don the tormek has a great book of institutional material and with a tool that does so many things. yes you need a book my new book will go into all the things that are difficult to grasp the goal is to help people get the most out off their tormek

I have down the flatning the back of the iron remember it’s not a high speed grinder so I have. used the side of all my grinders for this so it was not a difficult transition for me and it works as well as the worksharp for this once you master using this method

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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Manitario

2262 posts in 1484 days


#4 posted 861 days ago

I bought the Tormek T-3; and then realized that it was the weaker, smaller brother of the T-7, so I returned it and bought the T-7. Overall, I haven’t found it that difficult to use; the instruction book is very clear and well written. I’m not a fan of flattening the backs of plane/chisel irons on the side of the wheel; I find it quicker to use some coarse sandpaper and a granite block. I use the T-7 to establish the primary bevel on my tools and for sharpening a few of my chisels. I’m not convinced though that it gets the edges as sharp as using the scary sharp method up 2000 grit and then waterstones up to a 8000 grit which is my regular sharpening method.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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canadianchips

1831 posts in 1598 days


#5 posted 861 days ago

I think the book has already been written !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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Don W

14646 posts in 1169 days


#6 posted 861 days ago

Seriously Lance, I have been thinking of getting one for all of my restores. Once I get a blade where I want it, re-sharpening doesn’t take a mechanical device. Getting it there can be a pain though.

If all you did was woodworking for a hobby, and only re-sharpened your tools, do you think it would be a necessity?

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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lieutenantdan

176 posts in 907 days


#7 posted 861 days ago

Saw one of these for sale on CL. Don’t remember the city. What is a good price on a used one in good to very good condition??

-- "Of all the things I have lost in life, I miss my mind the most."

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1079 days


#8 posted 861 days ago

Don since I do turning I would say its a must own because its the best tool to reshape a tool in a controlled way it makes the tool accurate and you can modify a tool to a specific grind to get the results you want I choose the tormek T& because it works its ass off it doesn’t bog down like the griz or the delta or the jet. and it has the best jigs the drill bit gig alone is one of the finest tool ever made and it lets you put 4 facets on your drills making them easy to start with out walking out of your punch mark its like getting a brad point bit for the price of a harbor-freight set I would buy it just for that and yes i dont grind a plane iron every time i lap it i use a water stone or an oil stone I have not settled as I think i will add a set of Shaptons to my process but on most days i am in a hurry and so i use the pss1 from m-power

lt it depends on the model and age of the tormek put a used t7 is only a year old or so and 500 just for the unit would be a good deal any thing less is cake

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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RogerM

435 posts in 1000 days


#9 posted 861 days ago

I own a much older T3 and would be lost without it. Love it.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1079 days


#10 posted 861 days ago

the t3 was a great machine and your welcome to post your tips and ideas here Roger

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1079 days


#11 posted 843 days ago

I am about to delver into the drill jig in detail I have learned how to make some nice 4 facet drills and they are fabulous

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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electricalD

115 posts in 1711 days


#12 posted 843 days ago

I got the T-7 about a month ago at Lee Valley and bought the 5 jig promotion they have on for $175. I also bought the DVD, “Sharpening WoodWorking Tools” by Leonard Lee. The total deal cost $952 Canadian, shipped to my door. I am brand new to woodworking and when I first bought this there was some apprehension in using it for the first time. But before I even purchased this I bought Leonard Lee’s book, “The Complete Guide to Sharpening”. I found this book to be very informative and to me it is a must have before you tackle any kind of sharpening at all. In chapter five, when he deals with wet grinders, he states,”Nothing is safer than a wet grinder for shaping a cutting edge…....”. And really you need only to read the first five chapters to educate yourself on the academics of sharpening. The rest of the chapters deal with how to sharpen the tools themselves. For example, chapter six Leonard devotes to sharpening chisels. There is no point in trying to sharpen anything unless you educate yourself on the fundamentals. It’s like a guy going out to overhaul his car’s engine when he doesn’t understand what the purpose of the rings of a piston are for. I digress. Now as far as the T7 is concerned the DVD and book with it are excellent. My first try was an axe I take with me to the woods. And after I sharpened it, I was impressed and just went WOW. So then I tried some guinea pig knives and went from there. But you have to be careful with this unit as I found out that it will quickly grind away steel. The guide fence is good and solid and the micro-adjustment is a definite asset. At first I got a bit skeptical about this unit, and I read in a review from one gentleman that you have to be patient with it and practice. It takes time. But before I get into woodworking tools I have more practice to do. On thing is for sure the more I use it the more I like it. So I have a few cheap chisels to try as well as some other stuff. And I find this works well as I am not bothered by making any mistakes with them. So far I have no regrets with this purchase at all and I have shaved paper in 1mm thick slivers. Up until now this sharpening device was worth the cash and I would buy it again. And if you buy now it there is a 10 year warranty with it. (I am not a salesman either, just happy with it).

Dan P. NL

-- If there were no God, there would be no atheists, G. K. Chesterton

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1079 days


#13 posted 842 days ago

thanks for the reply Dan. I am glad your pleased. the curve is not difficult, I have a lot of time on a bench grinder so i took to the tormek like a fish to water. don’t be afraid to dive right in on any chisel or Plane Iron they are a snap with the straight angle jig if you need any help with anything i can help or i can ask my contact at Affinity tool Works they are the us distributor I think Canada too for the Tormek

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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northwoodsman

227 posts in 2348 days


#14 posted 842 days ago

I love my T-7. I wouldn’t say that everyone needs one, you just need a friend who has one. It makes your woodworking life a whole lot easier and much more enjoyable. My plane irons and chisels are always razor-sharp. I still have a full set of waterstones and an MK II, but I haven’t used them in probably 3 years or so. About every 6 months or so I set it up and dedicate a couple of hours to sharpening all of my tools. When I’m turning I’ll often set it up and touch of my edges whenever needed. It only takes a few seconds. The leather wheel gives you a nice polished edge. I let my buddies know when my “sharpening day” is and they bring me their chisels. I don’t charge them anything but I end up with a lot of nice gifts.

-- NorthWoodsMan

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thedude50

3503 posts in 1079 days


#15 posted 841 days ago

Thats nice of you not to charge them I know my tools are very sharp now because it is so easy admittedly i will use any of the 3 machines depending on what i am doing i keep the jet i have turned to the side for stropping haven’t the budget for a second T& yet

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

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