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Comparing Polyurethane Glue Brands

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Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 03-17-2012 02:52 PM 3226 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1596 days


03-17-2012 02:52 PM

First, an apology if there is a better subforum for this post than “Hand Tools.” Do we need a subforum for “Adhesives and Clamping”?

I have used Franklin PG for years and it has come to have a place on the worktable, especially for repairs. I also use it for outdoor applications when it’s appropriate.

Recently I got some cheaper stuff, shown. I used it in repairing two side chairs, white oak, I am guessing 50 or 60 years old. The adhesive is PL Premium Wood Glue 100% Polyurethane, made by Henkel. www.stickwithpl.com

I was surprised at the differences and determined that I had extrapolated that attitude from yellow glues, which I have found to be virtually the same—no big difference to make one superior to the other.

When I scrape the Franklin, it is crispy like fried pork rinds. Really. It is difficult to clean up once it has dried, because it sticks so well even when not clamped. It comes off, but it scars the piece. It is also difficult to clean it off too soon. There is a sweet spot about 30 minutes in when it comes off in one piece (and doesn’t spread around like it does when you try to clean it off too early).

The PL is different. I glued and clamped the chairs just before leaving last night and declampified them 14 hours later. The glue remaining was rubbery. The included photo shows a run which ran the length of the leg. I scraped it off with a chisel and took this shot to illustrate how stretchy it is.

I have no way to correlate my observations with how it sticks. I challenge someone, and this may land back in my lap, to get three different brands of polyurethane glue and do a test something like Woodgears did on various types.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


13 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3581 posts in 2706 days


#1 posted 03-17-2012 03:00 PM

Tried it, hated it, threw it away, test complete.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1596 days


#2 posted 03-17-2012 03:35 PM

What is the it? The whole genre of PGs, or just one of these brands?

L.

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1487 posts in 2098 days


#3 posted 03-17-2012 06:41 PM

When Polyurethane glues first came out, I think Gorilla Glue was the first, they were the greatest thing since sliced bread so I had to use them. Well, that didn’t last long and I went back to Elmers. I now still use it and Titebond II or III. In fact I recently saw an ad touting Titebond III stronger then Polyurethane glues.

The big thing I liked about Gorilla Glue was it was supposed to be waterproof, well after a few outdoor projects with the freeze thaw cycles here that turned out not to be true so that’s where Titebond III comes in now, it does much better. If fact these (scroll down to the last picture) using Titebond III stay out all winter and show no signs of the glue joints failing.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3581 posts in 2706 days


#4 posted 03-17-2012 09:42 PM

‘Nough said.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11493 posts in 1436 days


#5 posted 03-18-2012 01:44 AM

I’m with Bill. I tried the PL, hated it, and threw it away after it set up in the bottle. No, I didn’t leave it uncapped.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1596 days


#6 posted 03-19-2012 03:12 PM

Having heard from one side of the aisle, are there any folks on the other side who have used more than one PG brand and have some comments about one vs. another?

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

2386 posts in 1526 days


#7 posted 03-19-2012 03:25 PM

Three types of p.g..second the cleanup woes, and shelf life is a joke.
I used one to hopefully keep my 35 year old kmart shop stool together, failure, back to tightbond and the old wire tensioner trick..still sittin’ on it !

-- Glen, Vernon B.C. Canada

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1596 days


#8 posted 03-19-2012 04:11 PM

May I politely ask that the original question be considered?

If you want to rant about your failures with anything, maybe start a thread?

If you’d like to inquire if others have had successes with a given product with which you have reached a perceived dead end, maybe start a thread?

Passionate negatives are a part of life, but there’s a point at which they become tiresome. They can have a sneaky right up to profound effect on a group’s desire to move ahead and expand its capabilities.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3581 posts in 2706 days


#9 posted 03-19-2012 08:00 PM

Sorry Lee. Just tryin’ to share an experience about poor results. I’m still not buyin’ the stuff.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View YorkshireStewart's profile

YorkshireStewart

1117 posts in 2647 days


#10 posted 05-04-2012 09:18 PM

Thanks for raising this topic Lee. I can’t provide results of a controlled test, but can share my experience..

I have successfully used Gorilla for some years for certain jobs such as, say, the mitres on small photo frames. I recently decided to try Titebond Polyurethane expecting great things from it.

I’m really disappointed with its performance up to now. I’ve suffered a number of failures and had to re-glue despite applying the same amount as with Gorilla; same clamping etc. The squeeze-out, when it dries, has a much ‘crispier’ feel to it that suggests the glue joint might be more brittle?

Has anyone else had the same problems?

-- Res severa verum gaudium - True pleasure is a serious business. http://www.folksy.com/shops/TreeGems

View ShipWreck's profile

ShipWreck

536 posts in 2498 days


#11 posted 05-05-2012 09:34 AM

PG’s have thier place. I have used a few brands on some old house rehab’s, and a couple old wooden stairway restorations. Gorilla glue and Locktite(Henkel) were my favorates. I never tried the TiteBond. The down side to Poly’s is the cleaning because you cant just use a wet rag. I always used acetone for cleaning. It also expands alot while it is setting, so you need to keep and eye on it when it is used in a high profile area. I learned that the hard way on some custom cedar panels I was installing in a closet. As far as my woodworking hobby goes, I would never use it. Good old TiteBond PVA is alot easier to clean. My “science” was on job site applications flying by the seat of my pants.

A few places where I have used Poly’s :
1. Oily woods (Cedar closets)
2. Bonding pieces that are alreay finished
3. Wet wood
4. loose socket joints (stair ballusters) Poly’s expand alot

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1596 days


#12 posted 05-22-2012 03:05 PM

Yesterday I was gluing up some pretty moist cedar. One joint was a split that I repaired by forcing polyurethane glue into the crack, which I could spread. Because the split was on the bias, I had to level the two surfaces before I could clamp the joint. I use laminate samples and a clamp for this typically because yellow glue and even epoxy won’t stick to that surface.

Well, this poly stuck! Shown is the sample, which broke when I pried up one corner. You can see that parts of the wood remain on the surface. I was pretty impressed. This was the PL brand shown in the OP.

Every time you turn around in this craft, you get smacked with a learning!

Oh, for the record, the sample was Woolamai Brush, #4746 Wilsonart, #60 finish.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Charlie's profile

Charlie

1064 posts in 1032 days


#13 posted 05-22-2012 04:03 PM

Referencing Gorilla Glue polyurethane glue as that’s the only one I have a lot of experience with. I use it in building radio controlled airplanes out of different kinds of foam as it doesn’t eat the foam but sticks like mad. Another reason I use it is that it remains a little flexible. If I cut a channel in a wing and lay a carbon fiber spar in it, and then glue it in place with poly glue, the wing will break before that glue joint will break, yet it flexes with the wing and doesn’t become brittle.

I originally had problems with the foaming, then I learned to put a few drops of water in a mixing cup with the glue and stir it briskly for a couple seconds. Then wait about a minute while it foams up. When unrestricted it REALLY expands, becomes quite light, and is shape-able. I’ve carved little figures out of it (pilots, bombs… expand it in a tube…, and stuff like that). These little additions need to be extremely light as my planes are electric powered.

In a wood joint that’s loose, you can use the expansion to tighten it up quite a bit. Spray a little water on the wood right before gluing it up. The water is the catalyst that makes it expand. You don’t need the wood to be wet and shiny, just damp is all it needs to get going.

It won’t take a stain but if you use it as a “filler” and then strike the joint back at bit, you can use a stainable filler over the (now recessed slightly) joint. I am usually painting stuff I’ve used poly glue on so …. now realize teh scale I’m working at is not large… I can mix some microbaloons into a primer to thicken it up (talcum powder works too) and then get several good coats of primer on a piece, sand the primer, and really get a smooth finish for painting.

sorry…. I do ramble a bit.. wanna learn about lithium polymer batteries? ..... nevermind… hehehe

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