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Final steps to finish waterbased poly?

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Forum topic by BinghamtonEd posted 03-16-2012 11:33 AM 988 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


03-16-2012 11:33 AM

So I’m applying polycrylic on a cedar chest I’ve restored. I’ve got 3 thin coats on so far, and it seems like once I get above 3, I get horrible brush marks. I’m brushing on a thin coat and tipping it off, all using a synthetic Purdy brush. I can sand the brush marks out with 220, resulting in a dull matte finish, but a solid coating.

I guess my question here is, what’s the next step to finish this off? Another coat? Something else? Any tips about the brush marks? Should I sand it down to dull, then apply a wax or something? Sorry if I sound stupid, but I’m relatively new to all of this.

Thanks in advance!

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.


5 replies so far

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Marlow

116 posts in 2135 days


#1 posted 03-16-2012 01:06 PM

I have found that most water based finishes are very sensitive to heat/cold and humidity of the finishing environment. They just don’t seem to flow out well if its too cold: this could be related to your issue. Also, you mention thin coats: my experience suggests that water based finishes need to be applied in full wet coats so they can flow out and reach a smooth/level finish. Perhaps this is also a contributor to your problem. Finally, I have found that those cheap foam brushes work very well for H2O finishes: you might try that as well. If it was me, I’d sand it smooth, and apply another coat or two, keeping in mind the two issues mentioned above.

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


#2 posted 03-16-2012 01:15 PM

Thanks for your input, Marlow. I read elsewhere about the foam brushes, and based on your comment, I’ll give it a go. Makes sense about a little thicker coat leveling out better. We’ve also had major temperature fluctuations in the past two or three weeks here (about every week has had a couple days in the 60s and a couple in the 30’s). I’ve also noticed that it starts setting up very quickly, if I attempt to tip off a spot that’s been on more than a minute or so, it’s too tacky to do so.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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Marlow

116 posts in 2135 days


#3 posted 03-16-2012 07:52 PM

You don’t want to go back and try to finesse a spot that does not look quite right: get a full wet coat on as expeditiously as possible (working into the wet edge) , and walk away. I find that if you try to go back, you just make things worse.

View JoeyG's profile

JoeyG

1275 posts in 2090 days


#4 posted 03-16-2012 08:02 PM

I use polycrylic all the time. I have never tried to brush it on though. I use a cheap HVLP spray gun you can pick up at any big box store and get great results.

-- JoeyG ~~~ http://www.facebook.com/JHGWoodWorks

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1826 days


#5 posted 03-16-2012 08:39 PM

Your coats are too thin. Brush on full wet coats. Since you’re doing a box, paint the faces in stages so that the face being painted is horizontal, facing up.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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