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Do you build or buy your cabinet doors? What are some recommended door sellers?

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Forum topic by noone posted 03-15-2012 08:38 PM 10042 views 1 time favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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noone

559 posts in 1740 days


03-15-2012 08:38 PM

Do you build or buy your cabinet doors? If you buy, what are some recommended door sellers?


31 replies so far

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1888 days


#1 posted 03-15-2012 08:58 PM

That depends…

1) How big is the job? I don’t have much room in my small garage space for a lot of door parts AND the rest of the cases, so, if it is a big job (e.g. full kitchen) I am more likely to buy out the doors.

2) What is my time frame for the build? Buy out doors take about 10 days to 2 weeks to get in. If I need them sooner, I can pump them out day and night. OTOH, if I have a long time frame I can build the boxes AND still have time to build doors.

3) How complicated are the doors? This is sort of related to #2… but different. I’ve found I can order basic doors and embelish them to “upgrade” them. This takes a lot of time, but less time than building from scratch. Also, a radiused door can be costly, but, there are shops set up to make them more efficiently than I can. I’ve built enough of them that my pride isn’t injured (much) to have the specialists make them for me.

4) What is my work load like? If I have a lot of jobs running simultaneaously, I will use buy out doors to increase my capacity, even if it is a door I could easily make. There are only so many hours in a day.

I have a good relationship with my door shop and they have more specialized tools than I could ever have. This allows them to build faster, better quality and lower cost than I can do in house. A lot of times it makes sense to outsource. Your mileage may vary, but, that depends mostly on who you buy your doors from.

I’ve bought from out of state and also locally. I always use local, when I can, as there are generally fewer issues with moisture changes, and shipping damage. Your local rep can also make “house calls” to address any problems that may arise.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1507 posts in 2276 days


#2 posted 03-15-2012 08:59 PM

I build mine as well as for others, Send me a pm if your serious and I ll give you a price and delivery date.

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noone

559 posts in 1740 days


#3 posted 03-15-2012 09:03 PM

I’m a new woodworker and I need 4 shaker style doors, about 19” x 24” for my built ins. I am in Jacksonville, FL.

I like the idea of buying basic shaker doors and then dressing them up.

I would like my doors to look like this:

Any ideas on what molding I can apply to dress some standard shaker doors? Looks like some sort of screen bead, but of course, I don’t know where to buy it. I know you can’t get it at Home Depot or Lowes… :)

Here is the millwork that I have access to:
http://www.mouldingandmillwork.com/pdf/IND6808_Orlando_Profile_Guide.pdf

View Builder_Bob's profile

Builder_Bob

161 posts in 2527 days


#4 posted 03-15-2012 09:07 PM

I could probably build them, but for a little guy like me the cost of material nearly equals that of a fabricated door or drawer front. I’m doing the carcass, face frame, and drawer boxes for a new project I’m doing now and I’ll order the rest.

I went to Ameridoor last time (see my entertainment center project) and the parts were fine but the shipping was very expensive. Now, the place seems to have vaporized since I did that project. The stuff I bought last time just isn’t on their website now.

So now I found a Massachusetts outfit, SpragueWoodworking.com, that has nice products and is set up for the little guy like me. My plan is to order them and pick them up myself.

-- "The unexpected, when it happens, generally happens when you least expect it."

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1888 days


#5 posted 03-15-2012 09:13 PM

noone: That door is an applied molding door and not so much Shaker per se’. (Shaker’s religious beleifs forbade “extravagant” embellishments to avoid the sin of Vanity.)
A quick and cheap way to get this door is to buy a standard cope and stick door with an ogee or bead inside edge. Then add a 3/8” roundover profile to the face.

EDIT: You can see close ups of a raised panel door that I added the half round molding in my projects here. (Scroll down to the comments to see more photos)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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noone

559 posts in 1740 days


#6 posted 03-15-2012 09:16 PM

“A quick and cheap way to get this door is to buy a standard cope and stick door with an ogee or bead inside edge. Then add a 3/8” roundover profile to the face.”

Thanks for the clarification. As you can tell, i’m a complete newb on all of this.

Do you have an example of this type of door on a website? I am really struggling with trying to locate moulding in general here in Jacksonville FL. I don’t even think Home Depot has a 3/8” roundover profile, at least when I looked.

View jim C's profile

jim C

1467 posts in 2566 days


#7 posted 03-15-2012 09:18 PM

Go to www.rawdoors.net
Quality is flawless as well as price and delivery.
You can’t buy the wood alone for what they charge for a finished cabinet door.
Great people to deal with also.
DO NOT go to the cabinetdoorstore.com as they took my order, charged my c.c. did not deliver and would not return e-mails or phone calls. Total crooks.
My credit card company refunded my money, so there was no damage.

-- When I was a boy, I was told "anyone can be President", now I'm beginning to believe it!

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1888 days


#8 posted 03-15-2012 09:19 PM

I had my molding supplier make the roundover when he ran my crown molding order.

You can see the door I did in my projects. It was a basic cope and stick raised panel door that I added the molding in house.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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noone

559 posts in 1740 days


#9 posted 03-15-2012 09:23 PM

jim C – thanks for the reco. I’ll check them out.

Nice work DS251. So I will have to pay for a run of custom moulding to get this?

A little off topic, but what kind of primer and paint did you use and how did you apply it? I have read use an oil based primer and then water based enamel on top of it…...

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1888 days


#10 posted 03-15-2012 09:32 PM

When I made the door sample for my client I thicknessed a plank of maple to 3/8” and ran it on my router table with a 3/16”R roundover bit top and bottom. After sanding the profile I ripped the edges on my bandsaw, jointed the edges of the plank and routed another batch.

For that particular job, I already had a molding order going in so it made sense to order it at the same time. For four doors, you can make it yourself as I described.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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noone

559 posts in 1740 days


#11 posted 03-15-2012 09:34 PM

So is this door here just a plain inside edge beaded recessed panel door with the round over moulding off set from the edge the width of the inside bead to make it look like 3 ridges?


View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1888 days


#12 posted 03-15-2012 09:37 PM

As for primer and paint, I use a high performance pre-catalized lacquer in my project. ML Campbell makes a line that has a White Primer and a Top Coat. My supplier custom mixed the colors for me.

I had to spray a second coat of primer to conceal the woodgrain before the topcoat for the best effect. As always, I had to sand between coats.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1888 days


#13 posted 03-15-2012 09:42 PM

To answer your question about your door: It could be. You can take my shortcut mostly because this is a painted door. There is no cost difference to make the ogee inside edge instead of a square inside edge, but the applied molding is about half the cost using my “shortcut” method.

If this were taking a light colored stain, you would see the joinery might look a bit off using that method. A shaker style door with a full profile molding would be applied in that case. (The molding would have a rabbit outside edge to lap over the frame)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View noone's profile

noone

559 posts in 1740 days


#14 posted 03-15-2012 09:45 PM

Yeah, that website pic of the door ordering is price out at about 30 bucks a door. That sounds very attractive to me.

Do you use an HVLP sprayer? Wondering if a $500 or less is enough cash to buy one.

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1888 days


#15 posted 03-15-2012 09:48 PM

When I get bigger projects like that one, I rented a spray booth at a shop and used thier airless sytem.
For small stuff I get by with a HF cup gun (about $20). The overspray can make a real mess though, so be prepared.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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