LumberJocks

Drawer slides for kitchen cabs

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by rut posted 03-14-2012 06:21 PM 3409 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rut's profile

rut

81 posts in 1842 days


03-14-2012 06:21 PM

Is is appropriate to use ball bearing side mount slides for kitchen cab drawers? I’ve used them in the shop cab but they are harder to open compared to what most kitchen cabs use.

Undermounts look nice but are really pricey. Just looking for thought before I buy some. Also, I have 3 drawers that will be about 36” wide. The bottom will be 10” deep for pots/pans. Any special considerations for these drawers as far as slides go?

Thanks,
Rut


11 replies so far

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

1159 posts in 2150 days


#1 posted 03-14-2012 06:34 PM

The ball bearing slides work great as long as they aren’t pinched. Keep them sprayed up with silicone to keep them running smooth. They do make the kitchen appear a little more utilitarian compared to the undermounts.

The “almost 36” drawers should work fine, but I would never go any bigger on two slides. I always make my pot n pan drawers with a 1/2” plywood bottom, at that size and loaded with cookware the 1/4” just doesn’t hold up.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

View DLCW's profile

DLCW

530 posts in 2114 days


#2 posted 03-14-2012 07:45 PM

I have three levels of cabinets that I offer customers. The RTA (budget conscious buyer) cabinets feature a side mount ball-bearing full-extension slide (Futaba) with soft close. Semi-custom cabinet buyers can use the stock slides or can upgrade to under-mount Blum slides with soft close feature. Custom cabinets use the Blum under-mount soft close slides as standard.

I do a lot of large drawers for customers for pot/pan storage along with appliance storage and Sam is right in using 1/2” plywood bottom. I also increase the sides, front and back of these drawers to 3/4” instead of 5/8” baltic birch or solid maple. Most of the side mount slides will support up to 100lbs if you use the screw placement as instructed by the slide manufacturer. If you skimp on the numbers of screws you use, the 100lbs. is not guaranteed. With these larger drawers and the thicker sides, I would also go with a 5/8” screw and not a 1/2” screw to mount the slides.

As Sam indicates, if the cabinet is perfectly square, side mounts operate just as well as the more expensive under-mounts. Get the cabinet a little out of square or the front a little wider or narrower then the back and they won’t operate smoothly.

Look around to see if you can find a supplier who supplies cabinet makers and ask if you can purchase slides from them in bulk (if you are doing a lot of cabinets with drawers). You would be amazed at the price difference this way as apposed to buying from the hobby woodworking stores.

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

View rut's profile

rut

81 posts in 1842 days


#3 posted 03-14-2012 08:12 PM

Just curious, I’ve used the K&V slides which seem to take more pull force than you would want in a kitchen. Does the Futaba slide pull out easy?

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#4 posted 03-14-2012 08:55 PM

Ball bearing side mount slides like KV or accuride will work great in an kitchen cabinet environmental. Just make sure your boxes and drawers are square. Also make sure the drawers are of the proper width and they will work fine for a long long time. When I recently redid 20 year old kitchen the slide were still working as they should.

I’ve build many drawers over the last 35 years and always use 1/4 bottoms. I use good BB plywood. BB plywood is dam near a full 1/4 thick and very few voids. I use the 1/4 in all my shop cabinet too and some carry a heavy load . Still no problems.

Again in my recent new kitchen I use 1/4 inch BB plywood and I have some drawers that are 4 feet wide 22 inches deep and I don’t worry about them one bit.

I had my 120 pound stand right in the middle of one of my big drawers and measured a 1/4 inch deflection in the middle

of the drawer bottom.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View DLCW's profile

DLCW

530 posts in 2114 days


#5 posted 03-15-2012 08:24 PM

AlaskaGuy, where in AK do you reside? I grew up in Kodiak. I really miss it.

The Futaba’s slides have a 4-5lbs pull weight when opening. This is fairly standard for any soft-closing slides because of the retract mechanism. Most non-soft close slides have a 2-3lbs pull weight to overcome the self locking mechanism built-in to these slides. I don’t consider it an issue as it makes it tougher for little ones to open unless they are really trying.

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#6 posted 03-15-2012 08:50 PM

DLCW
I live 10 miles out of Anchorage and 6 miles off the main road.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

1159 posts in 2150 days


#7 posted 03-15-2012 08:57 PM

I once stood on a drawer box just like that in front of the customer to prove exactly your point AlaskaGuy!

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#8 posted 03-15-2012 09:08 PM

You’d be surprised how many of my clients bring me that one odd ball big drawer for me to repair because the 1/4” bottom failed after a dozen years or so.

It is an easy repair and I don’t mind doing it. You couldn’t make a profit with just drawer repairs, but, it just re-enforces why they buy cabinets from me instead of whomever is making all those big drawers with flimsy 1/4” bottoms in them.

:-D

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#9 posted 03-15-2012 10:05 PM

DS251

My day job is working in the carpentry maintenance shop for the Anchorage school district. We have over 100 schools and support building. I don’t know how many drawer are in the district but must be in the tens of thousands if not in the hundreds of thousands. Part of my job is repairing broken cabinets and their components.

About the only drawer bottoms we ever repair are the ones made with 1/4 melamine.

My shop drawers are all 1/4 BB bottoms some filled with heavy “stuff” and are 15 years old or older. No problems.

Those failed drawers must be from some kind of unusual abuse. No one can convince me 1/4 inch bottom made with good plywood are inferior.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View DS's profile

DS

2151 posts in 1880 days


#10 posted 03-15-2012 10:12 PM

You won’t get any argument from me. I typically use 1/4” BB ply bottoms in most all my drawers. Only wider, deeper, special use, or heavy loading drawers get the upgrade to 1/2” BB Ply.

IMHO a 10” tall Pots-n-Pan drawer automatically qualifies for the upgrade.

To the OP:
Any 100lb rated guide will handle the loading. Side mounted guides like the K/V, Accuride and Futaba guides typically lack the self closing feature that is desireable. The guides of this type with the self close have failure modes which I don’t like warrantying, so I avoid them.

The Blum Tandem with Blumotion soft close are expensive, but I’ve never had a complaint yet with them.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17113 posts in 2565 days


#11 posted 03-15-2012 11:02 PM

I use Accuride full extension bearing bearing slides with 3/4” thick drawers with half blind dovetails. The bottoms are 1/4” Baltic birch plywood and I have never had a problem with them. In the kitchen, I drop in a utensil organizer for the forks and knives and spoons. If someone does not like the looks of the slides on the sides, they do make an under drawer ball bearing slide that is totally hidden.
For that wide drawer, I’d use a 1/2 ” bottom, but the slides will hold 100#
............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com