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Forum topic by Dale Robinson posted 06-08-2008 02:26 AM 1223 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dale Robinson

33 posts in 2660 days


06-08-2008 02:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I went to a heritage festival today and talked to one of the guys doing woodworking with traditional tools I talked to him about a problem I was having making small joints that have a tight fit. He showed me a shooting board and told me how to use it.

He laid a board down on the shooting board and and ran a plane across the piece. When he was done, I noticed that he had actually planed the end grain of the board. I am using thin boards ( less that 1/2 inch thick ) and I have tried running end grain across my joiner with terrible results. Can the plane run across these thin boards without tearing them up?

Dale

-- Dale, southeast Misouri http://www.makingwoodentoys.net


11 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2844 days


#1 posted 06-08-2008 02:41 AM

Absolutely.

LumberJock Alf has good info on her web site

http://www.cornishworkshop.co.uk/shootingboards.html

My current shooting board setup is in my blog. Plane is by Lumberjock Phil Edwards and the shooting board is by Michael Conners out of Australia.

http://lumberjocks.com/jocks/WayneC/blog/1987

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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WayneC

12302 posts in 2844 days


#2 posted 06-08-2008 02:50 AM

Oh and if your looking to make a shooting board from the plans in Alf’s sites, I would recommend a used Stanley Baily 5 1/2 as a good starter plane to use. If you want to spend a little more money then one of the low angle jack planes from LN or LV.

Lie-Nielson Low Angle Jack Plane

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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WayneC

12302 posts in 2844 days


#3 posted 06-08-2008 02:51 AM

Also depending on what your doing you can plane end grain with the right technique with a low angle block plane or a bench plane for that matter.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Taigert's profile

Taigert

593 posts in 2587 days


#4 posted 06-08-2008 04:12 AM

I love my shooting board, I have it set up to do 90’s and 45’s. I use my LN low angle jack or my LN Scew plane they both do a great job.

-- Taigert - Milan, IN

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 2515 days


#5 posted 06-08-2008 05:14 AM

ya its not a good idea to run end grain over a jointer but a shooting board would work great on end grain. thats the beauty of planes, they can be used for almost any task you can think of.

View johnjoiner's profile

johnjoiner

160 posts in 2640 days


#6 posted 06-08-2008 05:34 AM

I use an old Bailey #7 with an after-market blade for my shooting. It’s a great thing to be able to fine tune the length of a piece 1/1000 of an inch at a time.

I played with both the LN and LV low angle jacks at the WW show a few months ago, and fell in love with the LN. But my #7 works well enough that I haven’t brought myself to spend the money yet.

-- johnjoiner

View Dale Robinson's profile

Dale Robinson

33 posts in 2660 days


#7 posted 06-08-2008 09:13 PM

Wow, guys.

Thanks for all the information. It was all very useful.

Dale

-- Dale, southeast Misouri http://www.makingwoodentoys.net

View Keith Cruickshank's profile

Keith Cruickshank

41 posts in 2391 days


#8 posted 06-09-2008 01:29 AM

Yes, as Wayne says, a low angle block plane is great for working end grain. If you don’t have a shooting board handy, the key in that case is to use a backer block or board to prevent tear-out on the back side where the blade edge exits the back side of the stock. The shooting board has one built-in so to speak, but you can get the same results in a pinch with a backer board simply mounted behind the stock place in a vice.

Good luck.

Keith
p.s. For some, this video demo might help – go to:
http://woodtreks.com/an-introduction-to-five-top-plane-types/20/
(go to minute 2 for block plane demo on end grain)

-- Keith Cruickshank, www.woodtreks.com - on-demand woodworking videos

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2844 days


#9 posted 06-09-2008 03:13 AM

Cool video Keith. Who is the manufacture of the wooden smoother and jointer? HNT Gordon?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1281 posts in 2484 days


#10 posted 06-09-2008 03:57 AM

They look like Ulmia brand planes

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2744 days


#11 posted 06-11-2008 07:48 AM

Dale – not much new to say here, but a shooting board is a must to fine tune the work you’re doing…especially good on that scale. It’s true that almost any well tuned plane can give you good results.

I use a LN 62 for my shooting, but have felt the LV and it really seems to have more heft (which may make it even a better plane for shooting). A friend of mine uses a 5 1/2 and that too has the heft needed. johnjoiner uses the #7. That fits the bill too! Size of the plane really depends on the work, though a larger plane can handle a much wider range of stock than a smaller one.

Good luck!

Here’s another couple LJ shooting board contributions…

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/3003

And Mot’s VIDEO:

http://lumberjocks.com/jocks/boboswin/blog/3407

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

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