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Forum topic by lwllms posted 03-14-2012 12:17 AM 4168 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lwllms

546 posts in 1978 days


03-14-2012 12:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: grinder hand grinder luther grinder best maide grinder sharpening grinding hand tools traditional

I think the Luther “Best Maide” grinders were about as good as they got. They originally came with a double grit wheel. The more coarse grit was for normal grinding and the fine grit was for honing. The grinder tilts so the side of the wheel is horizontal for honing. Over the years, there were a number of models of these and some are better than others. I don’t know the different model numbers off the top of my head so I won’t try to give them.

I’ve been working on modifying one for some special grinding. I picked this one up pretty reasonably because it was missing the wheel and tool rest. I’ve installed a 1” X 36 grit wheel and made a tool rest for it from machined 3 1/2” X 3 1/2” X 1/4” steel angle. I also added lever type knobs for quick adjustment.

Here’s another model with the original wheel and the somewhat difficult to find wrap around tool rest. This model is a hassle because you need a wrench for the tilt adjustment.

This is another model and one of the best, it’s just a little heavier duty than the others. This one has a tool rest that doesn’t wrap around the wheel but I think buyers had their choice of tool rests.

There are at least three more models of these. I don’t have access to them for photos. All of them can sell for relatively high prices if they have the original wheel and tool rest or if they’ve been put into working condition by adding a grinding wheel and/or tool rest.


8 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6956 posts in 1611 days


#1 posted 03-14-2012 01:56 AM

And all I have is an old Corona Grain Mill… I feel lucky… that I won’t wear myslef out as soon as you will!...

;-)

BTW, very cool piece of equip.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View DocBailey's profile

DocBailey

391 posts in 1057 days


#2 posted 03-14-2012 02:48 AM

Here’s mine – a No. 51. George Wilson (Luthier and Colonial Williamsburg Craftsman) made the oddly-sized arbor nut, arbor washer and bushing for me. I have since outfitted it with a Norton wheel, but have yet to create something in the way of a toolrest. The worm gear, turning in ball-bearings, and spinning in an oil bath make it operate like a swiss watch.
For those who do not know, that wingnut on the backside allows (see OP’s last picture) the whole carriage to be rotated 90 degrees to allow grinding on the side of the wheel.

View balidoug's profile

balidoug

363 posts in 1175 days


#3 posted 03-21-2012 01:47 PM

I’ve looked at several hand cranked grinders on e-bay but didn’t bid because I didn’t know if i could replace the wheels. are they standardized? my mechanical talents are even more meagre than my woodworking talents.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1487 posts in 2050 days


#4 posted 03-21-2012 01:57 PM

I’ve got one, I think. Been around over 50 years, think it’s in the garage, used to be mounted on the bench in there. Going to have to see if it’s still there and take a picture.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

546 posts in 1978 days


#5 posted 03-21-2012 05:57 PM

Doug,
Most standardization came about during WWII as a way to make things more maintainable. The Luther grinder, for example, has a shaft that’s 7/16” in diameter and the threaded part is 27 threads per inch , if I remember right. I had planned to make a new nut but my metal lather will do 26 tpi or 28 tpi not 27.

You can find one that’s complete, has had little use and is in good shape if you’re patient and keep your eyes open.

View balidoug's profile

balidoug

363 posts in 1175 days


#6 posted 03-22-2012 04:25 AM

OK, thanks. If I understand correctly, after WWII it’s probably a standard size. Pre-war will need some attention? I’m a user, not a collector, but appreciate how they “used to make ‘em”. You should see my Miller Falls drill press!

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

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lwllms

546 posts in 1978 days


#7 posted 03-22-2012 04:33 AM

It’s not necessarily the case that manufacturers switched to ANSI standards after they came into being. Stanley is an example of a company that kept using what it had been using and didn’t adopt the standards.

View balidoug's profile

balidoug

363 posts in 1175 days


#8 posted 03-22-2012 05:21 AM

Ah. Thanks for the tips. We’ll see what comes up.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

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