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Grounding my Cyclone DC

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Forum topic by Martyroc posted 03-12-2012 02:24 AM 679 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Martyroc

2708 posts in 995 days


03-12-2012 02:24 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi fellow LJ’s, just a quick question, I have almost completed my cyclone DC, it’s made of 99% wood, however inside there is a short piece of 4” PVC, about 14-16”. Here is the question, since there is only one small part of the DC that is using PVC pipe inside the cyclone, do I need to run a bare ground wire through the pipe, or it’s not enough PVC pipe to generate that much static electricity?

The piping in the shop will be flexible hose were I need to make turns, but the bulk of the piping will be sheet metal duct work, should that be grounded also?

Thanks, if you want to see what I mean about the CycloneDC out of wood here is a link to my blog LINK

-- Martin ....always count the number of fingers you have before, and after using the saw.


5 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1890 posts in 1182 days


#1 posted 03-12-2012 12:06 PM

There are those on both sides of the argument, but I would suggest you forget any grounding whatsoever. It’s accomplishes nothing, and adds considerable work when you make changes down the road (and you will make changes).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Martyroc

2708 posts in 995 days


#2 posted 03-13-2012 12:47 AM

Thanks Fred, unless I hear otherwise with a substantial argument for grounding, that’s the way I will go.

-- Martin ....always count the number of fingers you have before, and after using the saw.

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1854 posts in 2250 days


#3 posted 03-13-2012 01:36 AM

Need for grounding is an urban legend, it’s not backed by science.

-- Joe

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Grandpa

3184 posts in 1364 days


#4 posted 03-13-2012 01:52 AM

What I read states that there has NEVER been a documented case where a home dust collector caused a fire. I think the static can build and shock you. People actually bond their machinery. It is impossible to ground an insulator (plastic pipe is a non conductor). If you experience a shock caused by the static you can run the wire on the outside of the plastic pipe and accomplish the same thing. The following offers a lot of reading.

http://home.comcast.net/~rodec/woodworking/articles/DC_myths.html

View Martyroc's profile

Martyroc

2708 posts in 995 days


#5 posted 03-13-2012 02:14 AM

Thanks Joe & Grandpa, the PVC pipe is only a small part inside, I thought it was unnecessary, but i also figured it couldn’t hurt to ask. In my entire woodworking career I have never gotten shocked from wood, so I figured it was pointless.

Thanks for the Link Grandpa, very informative, this guy definitely did his research.

-- Martin ....always count the number of fingers you have before, and after using the saw.

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