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Neat find at a swap meet today, old wooden cove plane

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Forum topic by BTimmons posted 894 days ago 922 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BTimmons

2110 posts in 1111 days


894 days ago

Today I picked up this cove plane, along with an old Stanley router plane, an ultra fine ceramic stone, and some old chisels. The cove plane didn’t come with an iron and I’m wondering who might know what kind should go in there.

The mouth and wedge seem to be in alright shape. But while the top of the wedge that goes through the body is only about a quarter of an inch across, the mouth on the underside is about a whole inch wide.

So does the wedge only hold a fraction of a blade that’s short and wide, or does it hold a skinny blade that’s much smaller than the mouth? Either seems strange to me. The plane is stamped “Ohio Tool Company”. According to this site, this looks like a model 43 cove plane. The Ohio Tool Company was apparently in business from 1851 to 1920. One side of the plane has the number 9 and the other has a 92. The 9 doesn’t seem to correspond to a model number, but maybe the 92 refers to 1892, presumably when it was made.

Does anyone know much about this type?

-- Brian Timmons - http://www.BigTWoodworks.com


3 replies so far

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lwllms

540 posts in 1907 days


#1 posted 894 days ago

Brian,
That’s a round plane and the number is probably a number six you’re looking at upside down. Ohio Tool used different numbering systems at different times, at one point using two different ones at the same time, and their catalog numbers changed over time. Hollows and rounds, you plane once had a mate that was a hollow, were sold in pairs or sets and are probably the most common molding planes. The number should relate to the width of the sole in either eighths or sixteenths and the width of the sole is also the radius of the profile so the plane will cut a 60ยบ arc. Numbers on the larger planes with widths over one inch don’t follow this and that’s where things get real variable.

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BTimmons

2110 posts in 1111 days


#2 posted 893 days ago

Interesting. I’ll have to measure the sole to see if there’s a fractional measurement that makes sense. Maybe 6/4?

Do you know where I might get a replacement iron for a plane of this type?

-- Brian Timmons - http://www.BigTWoodworks.com

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lwllms

540 posts in 1907 days


#3 posted 893 days ago

Lie-Nielsen sells molding plane blade blanks but you have to shape and heat treat them yourself. Those that Lie-Nielsen sells are 1/8” thick at the cutting edge which are suitable for earlier and more valuable planes but 19th or 20th Century planes had thicker irons, 3/16” or more. You might find an iron on eBay if you keep an eye out there. The Lie-Nielsen irons can certainly work and, if you go that way, size the iron by the tang width. The tang on your plane’s iron is probably about 2/3 to 3/4 the thickness of the wedge.

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