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Forum topic by dlayland posted 03-11-2012 01:23 AM 2582 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dlayland

14 posts in 1137 days


03-11-2012 01:23 AM

I have an old Delta model 82-710 12” disk sander that has been sitting and rusting in the garage and various storage sheds since 1975. I got it out the other day and the motor ran smoothly. The problem is rust. I have never refurbished on old power tool and wonder if anyone has any hints on how to go about it. I let the motor run for several minutes and it never overheated or missed a beat. I figure if I could clean it up it would be a nice addition to my wood shop. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

-- Dave


13 replies so far

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dustbunny

1149 posts in 2048 days


#1 posted 03-11-2012 02:28 AM

Evapo-Rust
Bought a gallon of it the other day at Harbor Freight.
Used it on my 1930 something Walker Turner scroll saw table top.
400, 600, 800 grit wet dry sandpaper…..Shines like the top of the Chrysler Building
Very little muscle involved. It does eat paint.
Try it.

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

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dlayland

14 posts in 1137 days


#2 posted 03-11-2012 04:13 AM

Thanks, Lisa. Will give it a try. there is a lot of rust. hope it works

-- Dave

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dustbunny

1149 posts in 2048 days


#3 posted 03-11-2012 04:26 AM

I would try to debulk as much of the rust as you can with a wire brush first or even sandpaper.
Then bathe it.

Let us know how you make out.

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

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MrRon

2991 posts in 1996 days


#4 posted 03-11-2012 06:57 PM

First I wirebrush heavy rust off; then use a sanding sponge and WD-40 [cast iron surfaces only]. Finish with pure Carnuba wax.

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MrRon

2991 posts in 1996 days


#5 posted 03-11-2012 07:01 PM

Lisa, I’ll try that Evapo-Rust. Of all the machines in my shop, my HF wood lathe is the only one that rusts badly.

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dlayland

14 posts in 1137 days


#6 posted 03-12-2012 12:06 AM

Thanks everyone. I found a friend who had some and have started on the small pieces first. Will post a photo when I complete the refurbishing of the sander.

-- Dave

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Roy Turbett

18 posts in 2333 days


#7 posted 03-13-2012 03:43 AM

When I restored my 1955 Powermatic 90, I cleaned up the headstock, tailstock and tool banjo using electrolosis. I made my “spooge” tank out of plastic muck bucket I bought at Tractor Supply. I lined the inside wall with sheet metal and ran a bolt through to the outside near the top of the bucket. I suspended the parts with copper wire from a steel bar across the top of the bucket and covered them with a solution of 1 part water to one tablespoon washing soda. Then I hooked up the negative feed from my battery charger to the steel bar and the positive feed to the bolt. I set the charger to 2 amps and let it work over night. It loosened all the rust and removed the paint. Many people prefer this to evaporust because no acid is involved and it doesn’t remove any of the good metal.

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Roy Turbett

18 posts in 2333 days


#8 posted 03-13-2012 03:54 AM

When I restored my 1955 Powermatic 90, I cleaned up the headstock, tailstock and tool banjo using electrolosis. I made my “spooge” tank out of plastic muck bucket I bought at Tractor Supply. I lined the inside wall with sheet metal and ran a bolt through to the outside near the top of the bucket. I suspended the parts with copper wire from a steel bar across the top of the bucket and covered them with a solution of 1 part water to one tablespoon washing soda. Then I hooked up the negative feed from my battery charger to the steel bar and the positive feed to the bolt. I set the charger to 2 amps and let it work over night. The electric current loosens the rust and transfers it to sacrifical anode – in this case the sheet metal and rebar. Any loose paint is also removed and settles to the bottom of the tank. A scotchbrite pad or wire wheel removes any remaining residue. Many people prefer this to evaporust because no acid is involved and it doesn’t remove any of the good metal.

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dlayland

14 posts in 1137 days


#9 posted 03-13-2012 04:24 AM

That’s how mine looks. It just so happens we used to have horses and there are 2 muck buckets in my garage. Sounds like I might have some experimenting to do. your loathe is awesome looking.

-- Dave

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tomd

1810 posts in 2523 days


#10 posted 03-13-2012 04:38 AM

Wow, that’s a beautiful job you did, it looks terrific.

-- Tom D

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dustbunny

1149 posts in 2048 days


#11 posted 03-13-2012 12:40 PM

TajBuilder,
That is awesome !
I am restoring a Walker Turner Scroll/jig saw 1930’s.
I think I will try electrolysis for the bigger casting parts to remove rust AND paint.
The smaller parts worked nicely in the Evapo-rust. It is non-toxic and environmentally friendly.
I think it is concentrated citric acid. I have put my fingers in it and had no effects to skin.
(It was an accident, not on purpose.)
Here are the upper and lower vise chucks. They looked like the bolts in the upper right corner.
Both after Evapo-Rust for 24 hours, the left one after wiping and polishing. Not bad huh ?

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

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Roy Turbett

18 posts in 2333 days


#12 posted 03-13-2012 07:26 PM

Lisa -

Those parts look great. I used naval jelly on the ways of the lathe which is a similar solution. What I like about the spooge tank over evaporust is the solution never wears out so I think its cheaper in the long run. You just add water to replace what has evaporated. but don’t have to add any more washing soda. Several friends in my turning club made smaller tanks out of 5 gal plastic pails and you can use any ferous metal except for stainless steel for the anode. You don’t want to use stainless steel because it becomes toxic as it breaks down. Some people recommend against using galvanized metal because the zinc can end up plating the piece you are restoring. I didn’t find this was a problem and you can avoid the problem by changing the water.

Roy

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1446 days


#13 posted 03-13-2012 07:30 PM

Dustbunny, I use electrolysis preferentially but evaporust on parts that’ll fit in a mason jar. I usually loosen up grime with a powered brass brush. I like the little pointy-ones that deform into tiny crevices. I used to use a rotary tool but the brushes really add up $. I’d estimate that 75% of the people I know who restore vintage use Evaporust. It’s good stuff.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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