LumberJocks

Installing kitchen cabinet

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by richgreer posted 03-10-2012 02:09 PM 1679 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2536 days


03-10-2012 02:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: -

I know this is more of a carpentry question, as opposed to a woodworking question, but I suspect there is someone out there with good advice on this question.

I am installing new kitchen cabinets into a condo. I am using pre-made cabinets. There is one cabinet that sets between the stove and refrigerator. It is only 12” wide and does not attach to cabinets on either side. It also does not line up with any stud in the wall it butts against. The floor underneath is concrete (covered with vinyl).

How would you secure this cabinet in place?

Options I have considered include tearing out some dry wall and running a 2×4 horizontally between studs and securing to the floor. I see problems with each approach.

Surely, professional cabinet installers run into this problem on occasion. What do they do?

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.


12 replies so far

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2346 posts in 2458 days


#1 posted 03-10-2012 02:19 PM

Because this is between fridge and stove it shouldn’t get bumped to hard so I would use butterfly nut bolts into drywall. 2 along top and 2 lower to bottom.
PL900 base onto floor.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 2430 days


#2 posted 03-10-2012 02:41 PM

If it’s between a stove and refrigerator would it ever get bumped into from the side with such force that it would rip away from the wall? i.e. it’s shielded either side?

If that’s the case and if the carcase is the same as they’re made in Europe I would attach this to the wall using metal brackets held to the wall with heavy duty plasterboard toggles. If it’s not coming back out again, you might even apply a bead of adhesive along the edges where they touch the wall.

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 2430 days


#3 posted 03-10-2012 02:45 PM

Canadianchips posted his answer while I was posting mine, that’s why it’s duplicated…

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2523 posts in 2899 days


#4 posted 03-10-2012 02:53 PM

have you considered running a tastefully made thin piece of strapping from one stud to another behind the stove and fridge near the top and bottom of the cabinet. Then screw into the strapping? Assuming the cabinet has room behind it. If not possibly you can notch the cabinet back if there is a space?

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2523 posts in 2899 days


#5 posted 03-10-2012 02:55 PM

Another option would be to put a couple of 2×4” (cut to height) under the cabinet with lag screws into the cement. Then sit the cabinet over the 2 by’s and screw the floor of the cabinet into them.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17960 posts in 2029 days


#6 posted 03-10-2012 03:15 PM

If its setting on the floor, I agree with any/all of the above. A few good fasteners in solid sheetrock will hold a quite a bit of perpendicular force. I like the butterfly, PL900 idea the best. Its going to take a pretty strong man to pull that off the wall.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4450 posts in 3422 days


#7 posted 03-10-2012 04:07 PM

Standard toggles thru the ‘rock. Strong shear resistance. Be sure to use washers (fender washers) inside the cab body. Do it all the time.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1816 days


#8 posted 03-10-2012 05:00 PM

Honestly, the butterfly and zip screws only really work when the building is level. When it’s a building like a condo, they tend to be thrown together in mass, and are rarely square and level. And though I really hate to make these kinds of suggestions, adding blocking in the wall is the best way to make sure it’s right. This way if you have to pull back tight to the wall and lift the front end off the floor to level it, then there will be no danger, yes you can shim it on the floor, but they tend to get knocked out when trimming the cabinets.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View Steve Peterson's profile

Steve Peterson

324 posts in 2544 days


#9 posted 03-11-2012 08:31 PM

I would cut a large hole in the sheetrock behind the cabinet that is big enough to add a flat 2×4 between the studs. You will need to round off one corner so that it can twist into position. Then screw it into place.

If you use something like a rotozip for the cutout, you will be able to use the same piece of sheetrock to patch the hole. You can tape and spackle the seam if you want. It will be hidden so there is no real need for paint.

-- Steve

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2536 days


#10 posted 03-11-2012 08:41 PM

Thanks to all for some good advice and insight.

He is my current thinking – - Using a tool like the Fein Multimaster (I have the Rockwell version) I will cut out a neat, rectangular piece of drywall that is 16” from center to center on the studs. I will cut a piece of oak that replaces the drywall and screw it into each stud. I will plaster in the crack between the drywall and board and paint to match the walls. Then I will secure the cabinet to the oak.

Note that the painted oak will only be visible if one looks down the 3/8” gaps between the range and cabinet or the fridge and cabinet.

This is sort of a woodworker’s solution to a carpentry problem.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1816 days


#11 posted 03-11-2012 10:44 PM

why waste the oak?

easy enough to cut out a piece of the sheetrock drop in a two by. then put the sheetrock back and patch it.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View devann's profile

devann

2200 posts in 2154 days


#12 posted 03-12-2012 03:53 AM

I agree with TCC above. But another option is using toggle bolts to fasten a plywood cleat to the wall, and the secure the cabinet to the plywood.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com