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Forum topic by Absinthe posted 03-06-2012 02:32 PM 1013 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Absinthe

84 posts in 1993 days


03-06-2012 02:32 PM

Album

Here is a massive breakdown of a spinning wheel that I am estimating to be somewhere in the 1800’s.

It is possible (likely) that the turned parts are different than the base parts.

My goal is to restore this as close as possible. To start with I will have to back-fill the uprights and replace the likely bearing surface with leather, bone, stag etc. However, I would like to keep close to species on any wood filling I do.

There is one small turned piece ultimately missing from the distaff assembly that I will have to make, and likely I will have to completely remake the flyer (Y shaped piece) since it was repaired quite poorly and would be dangerous at the speeds it would be used.

In addition to that, the treadle assembly feels quite a bit like different wood, and was likely replaced, as the workmanship does not match and the wood feels quite different to the hand.

I realize the species ID is touch from pictures, but I think if I get enough guesses together I can come up with a close approximation.

-- Absinthe


12 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3680 days


#1 posted 03-06-2012 02:42 PM

Just judging from the photos where end grain is visible, and from the flakes, my thought is white oak.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1993 days


#2 posted 03-06-2012 03:14 PM

White oak would make sense. Do you think the turned pieces and flat pieces are of the same species?

-- Absinthe

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CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3680 days


#3 posted 03-06-2012 06:51 PM

I guess it is possible they could have used a different species for the spindles, but I really couldn’t say from the photos.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1993 days


#4 posted 03-06-2012 08:26 PM

I will try to pick up some pieces this weekend.

-- Absinthe

View dave_bug's profile

dave_bug

5 posts in 1741 days


#5 posted 03-06-2012 08:30 PM

I found this site while trying to identify some wood myself http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/research/centers/woodanatomy/wood_idfactsheet.php I sent some out to them and am waiting to hear back. If you have the time and can spare a sample they may be able to help you out.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#6 posted 03-07-2012 12:25 PM

Definitely white oak.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Absinthe's profile

Absinthe

84 posts in 1993 days


#7 posted 03-07-2012 12:32 PM

Wow, you say that with such conviction!! :)

-- Absinthe

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 2699 days


#8 posted 03-07-2012 01:05 PM

White oak is the traditional wood used in green wood construction that a lot of early furniture was made from. You only needed a few metal hand tools and you could use green white oak to make a shaving horse to hold and work your pieces, you could also use it with just a few metal parts to build a spring pole lathe to turn the spindles and anything else you needed to make. The colonial forests were full of tight grained white oak. It splits straight with the fibers in the splits running straight through the work piece. Dry maple dowels were often turned for spindles and pegs to hold parts together. Here’s a great website with information on working with green white oak. http://www.greenwoodworking.com/ I don’t know that’s how your 1800’s spinning wheel was built, but a lot of original furniture was.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

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RogerM

759 posts in 1861 days


#9 posted 03-07-2012 01:44 PM

The body/structure pieces appear to be white oak. The spindles and some of the more intricate mechanisms appear to be a closed grain wood such as maple or birch.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View Absinthe's profile

Absinthe

84 posts in 1993 days


#10 posted 03-07-2012 01:55 PM

I started cleaning it thinking I was just removing built up and hardened wax, but I think I have run into shellac. :( I hit it with a little denatured alcohol and it softened it but also took out the color in one area. I don’t really want to strip out 200 years of patina, so I guess I will just clean it up as best I can, and hit it with some danish oil and hope for the best. :S

-- Absinthe

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#11 posted 03-08-2012 03:51 AM

Absinthe,

I have been around the block a few times. As a Forester, Sawyer, and Woodworker, I have seen a good bit it. The width of the ray fleck is distinctive.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Absinthe

84 posts in 1993 days


#12 posted 03-08-2012 11:29 AM

Excellent, then I am not looking at a random guess, but an authoritative answer. Thanks!

Now on to my next stupid question :)

-- Absinthe

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