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HOW TO GLUE HARBOARD TO A SUBSTRATE

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Forum topic by Metrotek posted 02-29-2012 05:31 PM 1871 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Metrotek

134 posts in 1428 days


02-29-2012 05:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: mdf covered with melamine partical board covered with melamine particle board gluing hardboard question clamp veneering milling shop fixtures jigs table saw outfeed tables adhesives

Hi guys; I need to know the best way to glue a piece of hardboard to a substrate, e.g. particle board for my outfeed table. I was going to use melamine covered particle or MDF but I saw one made with hardboard and I have to just use whatever I can get in the cull rack or purchase a partial and they don’t sell partials pieces of MDF covered with melamine similar with particle as the substrate.
Thank you for your time and expertise in regard to this question.

-- “Computers have enabled people to make more mistakes faster than almost any invention in history, with the possible exception of tequila and hand guns.” — Mitch Ratcliffe


5 replies so far

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

7822 posts in 2392 days


#1 posted 02-29-2012 06:00 PM

I would just screw it down with countersunk drywall screws.
That way you can replace it easily without throwing away
the piece underneath.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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Jeremy Greiner

568 posts in 1516 days


#2 posted 02-29-2012 06:12 PM

I plan on doing the same thing because I like the look of hardboard over melamine and I know hardboard waxes up super smooth with some paste wax.

Really what we’re looking to do is veneer a piece of hardboard onto mdf or particle board (I plan on using MDF but I’d imagine particle board would work).

I plan on making the pieces over sized, applying a bunch of glue and use something heavy to weigh the hardboard down. Depending the size you can use those cheap harbor freight vacuum bags as small veneer presses I’ve read. But for an outfeed table that doesn’t seem practical.

Once it’s glued down, I’ll cut it to final size.

That’s my plan anyways, no idea how well it’ll work :)

-jeremy

-- Easy to use end grain cutting board designer: http://www.1024studios.com/cuttingboard.html

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crank49

3506 posts in 1715 days


#3 posted 02-29-2012 06:33 PM

Double sided carpet tape.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

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bondogaposis

2741 posts in 1096 days


#4 posted 02-29-2012 06:35 PM

Contact cement is the best way to go. Get the water based stuff and follow the directions on the can.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1940 days


#5 posted 02-29-2012 08:48 PM

As Michael says above …............If you use the double sided carpet tape around the edges and a few pieces in the middle you can replace it when it gets all chewed up. Cut the hardboard about 1/4” larger than table top all the way round then hit it with router and trim bit to flush the edge with your table.

If you want to extend your miter slots into your outfeed table you can easily do that with a router, 3/4” straight bit and straight guide. After you install your HB top use the router and flush trim bit to cut miter extensions into your hardboard.

In a situation like yours, where great strength is not required, you can get away with the thinner 1/8” hardboard and save a bit of money.

Good luck!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

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